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Position Title: Police Officer
Department: Campus Police
Location: Campus Police
Grade: Not Applicable
Position Status: Union Positions
Position Description: BASIC FUNCTION:
Support the overall mission of the WPI Police Department to provide a safe and secure living and learning environment for all members of and visitors to our community.

PRINCIPAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

Protection of life and property.
Provides public safety related services (i.e., escorts, lock-out assists, etc.) equally to all of the members of and visitors to the WPI Community in a manner that demonstrates dignity and respect for all.
Actively seek to identify safety and security related problems and to take the necessary steps to solve those problems quickly and efficiently.
Promote and participate in crime prevention and safety awareness programs on campus and in the peripheral property areas near WPI.
Prevent criminal activity from occurring on the campus and in the peripheral property areas near WPI.
Respond quickly to emergency calls for police services. These include reports of crimes, criminal activities, medical emergencies, environmental emergencies, fire and intrusion alarms and accidents. Officers are required to conduct thorough investigations into these police emergency incidents and to submit written reports in all cases.
Perform safety and security inspections of all campus buildings and grounds both on foot and in vehicles.
Enforce all of the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and applicable WPI safety, security and traffic regulations.
Takes proper police action at scene of crime, administers first aid, gathers evidence, locates witnesses and makes arrest; appears in court to present evidence and testify against persons accused of crimes.
Ascertains validity of information and/or secures evidence for the arrest of persons alleged to have committed a crime; searches for and preserves evidence; interviews suspects, prisoners, complainants, and witnesses, information about crimes; makes detailed reports.
Performs other related duties as assigned.

ABILITY TO:
Cope with situations firmly, courteously, tactfully and with respect for the rights of others.
Analyze situations quickly and objectively, and to determine a proper course of action to be taken.
Understand and carry out oral and written instructions.
Write and speak effectively.
Learn both the technology and clerical systems associated with the police officer position.

Requirements: REQUIREMENTS:

High School diploma or equivalent required, associate's degree (or higher) in Criminal Justice Studies preferred.
Up to 3 months experience in related field preferable.
At least one year experience in a public safety services field preferred.
Mature adult, at least 19 years of age of good character.
Familiar with Microsoft word, Access control and closed circuit camera functionality.
Cannot have been convicted on a felony crime.
Must be dependable, honest and possess good inter-personal communications skills.
Successful completion of a MCJTC basis recruit police academy program for Municipal Police Officers or a Special State Police Officer's recruit academy is preferred.
If the candidate is not academy trained, that candidate must be physically fit and able to successfully complete a full MCJTC Municipal or Special State Police officer's training academy.
Must have a valid Massachusetts motor vehicle operator's license.
Must have a Massachusetts firearm license and successfully pass the MCJTC's firearms qualification program using the weapon issued by the WPI Police Department and any other required and/or In-Service Training.
Candidate must pass a thorough Background Investigation and CORI check.
Upon preliminary offer candidate must undertake and pass a full medical exam, drug testing and psychological exam.

Posting Date: 11-14-2012
Closing Date: Open Until Filled
Special Instructions to Applicants: In compliance with Mass Police Accreditation, in addition to a resume and WPI application, three written professional references must be included when applying.
To enrich education through diversity, WPI is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer.

A Member of the Colleges of Worcester Consortium
 

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I think, therefore I'll never be promoted.
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A Member of the Colleges of Worcester Consortium

Right there baby, that's what really counts!

Seriously, I visited them several years ago and the folks I spoke to seemed like good people and though like all of us, had their gripes, they seemed satisfied with the job. Then again, I'm not sure of any of them are still there.
 

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Might be a good way to get a ride through the full mcjtc academy. Weird how they say sspo OR ft academy.
Why is that weird?

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Why is that weird?
Simply because colleges usually send people to the SSPO academy since they know if they send them to the municipal academy they might jump ship. My assumption is that it might have to do with a SSPO academy not being run for a while due to scheduling.
 

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Why is that weird?

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Colleges seem to pick either MPTC Full-time Academy (U-Mass, BU, BC, etc) or SSPO. It is not usually either or. I, along with many others think the system for academies is so fucked up. MPTC is great because it can help you land a municipal police job. I hear SSPO is a good academy, but it is only accepted for college and hospital police agencies. You can even get a waiver if you have a college degree and a reserve academy and get SSPO certified without going to their academy.

I could get hired as a reserve officer and have to go to the MPTC Reserve Academy. Then get hired at a campus police officer and go through the SSPO academy. Now I take a job at a Sheriff's Department and go through a MSA approved academy. Then I get hired by a municipal department and go through the MPTC Basic Recruit Academy. Lets not forgot the state police and their own academy. That is 5 separate academies in 1 state.
 

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Nothing at all weird about wanting one or another. They just want an academy behind you. If you went through the sspo one and apply, GREAT. If you went through the muni one and apply, GREAT. I don't get what's weird about that.
 

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Nothing at all weird about wanting one or another. They just want an academy behind you. If you went through the sspo one and apply, GREAT. If you went through the muni one and apply, GREAT. I don't get what's weird about that.
This

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Colleges seem to pick either MPTC Full-time Academy (U-Mass, BU, BC, etc) or SSPO. It is not usually either or. I, along with many others think the system for academies is so fucked up. MPTC is great because it can help you land a municipal police job. I hear SSPO is a good academy, but it is only accepted for college and hospital police agencies. You can even get a waiver if you have a college degree and a reserve academy and get SSPO certified without going to their academy.

I could get hired as a reserve officer and have to go to the MPTC Reserve Academy. Then get hired at a campus police officer and go through the SSPO academy. Now I take a job at a Sheriff's Department and go through a MSA approved academy. Then I get hired by a municipal department and go through the MPTC Basic Recruit Academy. Lets not forgot the state police and their own academy. That is 5 separate academies in 1 state.
No offense, but you're new here huh?
 
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Just saying it was weird because usually it's one or the other. Bigger chance of you taking off after muni academy than the sspo. Id figure they would pick one thats all.
 

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Just saying it was weird because usually it's one or the other. Bigger chance of you taking off after muni academy than the sspo. Id figure they would pick one thats all.
No it's actually very common for schools to accept either. By taking candidates with the MPOC it also opens the job up to retired municipal cops which is an applicant pool of trained experienced officers.

The trend I've noticed is most of the larger colleges want a FT academy (SSPA, MPOC, or out of state with a FT waiver from the MPTC), the smaller schools will accept R/I academy as long as there are other qualifications to obtain a waiver for their SSPO.
 

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No offense, but you're new here huh?
He may be new, but the last paragraph is spot on and exemplifies how ridiculous and duplicitous the police training system is set up in this lovely Commonwealth.

Except for departments that staff their own academy (State, Boston, Transit, Lowell, etc...) send municipal police and campus police through the a basic MPTC class.

If the colleges want a more specific block of training geared toward campus issues, (totally understandable), work with the MPTC to offer a specialized training course (2, 3, 4 weeks, whatever), immediately following graduation that experienced campus officers teach, and officers receive a specialized certificate in "campus police operations" or whatever they want to call it.

Excuse me if I have offered some higher order thinking... okay, okay, any thinking. I know that doesn't usually jive with anything related to the government (police training included).

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If the colleges want a more specific block of training geared toward campus issues, (totally understandable), work with the MPTC to offer a specialized training course (2, 3, 4 weeks, whatever), immediately following graduation that experienced campus officers teach, and officers receive a specialized certificate in "campus police operations" or whatever they want to call it.
It's not that colleges want more specific training, they want the training to not meet the minimum standards of the MPTC so their officers will not be able to jump ship for a municipal job. All the colleges care about is attempting to control attrition
 

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He may be new, but the last paragraph is spot on and exemplifies how ridiculous and duplicitous the police training system is set up in this lovely Commonwealth.

Except for departments that staff their own academy (State, Boston, Transit, Lowell, etc...) send municipal police and campus police through the a basic MPTC class.

If the colleges want a more specific block of training geared toward campus issues, (totally understandable), work with the MPTC to offer a specialized training course (2, 3, 4 weeks, whatever), immediately following graduation that experienced campus officers teach, and officers receive a specialized certificate in "campus police operations" or whatever they want to call it.

Excuse me if I have offered some higher order thinking... okay, okay, any thinking. I know that doesn't usually jive with anything related to the government (police training included).

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I wasn't implying he was wrong. I'm simply pointing out that this topic is so played out. It's been discussed hundreds of times here. Massachusetts is completely obnoxious when it comes to police training. Got it.
 

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Colleges seem to pick either MPTC Full-time Academy (U-Mass, BU, BC, etc) or SSPO. It is not usually either or.
If an agency accepts the SSPO academy, ( such as WPI ) they will also accept the Full-time MPTC Academy. I can't think of any that would exclude candidates because they have an MPTC Academy.
 

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I think, therefore I'll never be promoted.
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The horse isn't just dead, it's rotted away, been burried, eaten by worms and been reincarnated as a chief somewhere...or at least it's ass has. Let's stop beating it, shall we?
 
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