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Hi all, just a quick question on under-age parties. My friend was throwing a grad. party the other night, a bunch of people from my work were planning to attend. However, one girl I work with is only 15 or 16 and she wanted me to give her a ride to the party ( I'm 19 ). I don't drink, so I guess I would've turned into her designated driver, but I didn't want any responsibility for her. If I brought her to the party and something happened, would I be the one liable for her actions? I ended up not going anyway, but I was curious as to what could happen. Thanks for any information you can offer!
 

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Here's a hint: sometimes in life we have to be selfish...if you care at all about your future career, you will steer FAR FAR away from parties where underage drinking occurs, and you will not associate with persons who allow it to take place.

Ask yourself if your friendships with these people and the night of socializing with an intoxicated teenager are really worth you flushing your future down the toilet for?
 

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Risks are risks, but aiding the delinquency of a 15 or 16 year old? Wow people drink young these days. From now on I'm going to be carding the chicks at any bangers I attend! Under 16, no way. Haha just kidding 18 works for me.
 

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Future Shock,

Smooth move not going anyway...............

NEVER take anybody younger than your 19 years to any ADULT function with Alcohol present. You don't need to be a lawyer to answer civil liability questions like these. Common Sense alone will do it
8)
 

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If you get yourself in a jam at an underage party you will certainly have to loose the "FutureCop" from your screen name, especially with 15 and 16 year olds. It does not take most reasonable parents, (and I say most because there are the exceptions), long to fill up the station lobby demanding someone be charged for hosting the party, furnishing alcohol to minors, or contributing to the delinquency of a minor when their 14, 15, 16, or 17 year old "perfect child" has to call them at 3am to say..."I am at the police station in protective custody/under arrest"

Not trying to lecture, but if your serious about getting on the job use your head about things like that. It is competative enough to get a law enforcement job in MA. A charge like that is an easy way for you to get weeded out of the process.
 

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frapmpd24 - thanks for taking what I said and phrasing it much more politely...I was taken aback by the original question and responded with fire in my heart, which was really un-called for... :wink:
 

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revtrent";p="66470 said:
Question: If you are placed in protective custody, does it appear on your record?
No, if you run a BOP there would be no record. The PD that lets you sleep it off on their concrete couch however will have a record of your stay.
 

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sgtmvm";p="66471 said:
frapmpd24 - thanks for taking what I said and phrasing it much more politely...I was taken aback by the original question and responded with fire in my heart, which was really un-called for... :wink:

sgtmvm";p="65993 said:
Here's a hint: sometimes in life we have to be selfish...if you care at all about your future career, you will steer FAR FAR away from parties where underage drinking occurs, and you will not associate with persons who allow it to take place.

Ask yourself if your friendships with these people and the night of socializing with an intoxicated teenager are really worth you flushing your future down the toilet for?
Sgtmvm - Your first post is acurate and to the point as it gets and I don't see it as that rude. Just figured I would add a post with an example incase there needed to be some "reading between the lines" about the potential implications.

A question like posed to me by someone in person would likely get a combined response of A) Don't be stupid, it is easy to ruin your career hopes and B) Followed by an example of why and how. And probably a confused look as to why the person is even asking such a common sense question with an obvious answer what should be done.
 

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Use Fake ID -- Lose Your License

Registry Of Motor Vehicles Has Right To Suspend Privleges

POSTED: 6:06 pm EST January 16, 2006
UPDATED: 6:39 pm EST January 16, 2006

BOSTON -- As thousands of students returned from winter break this month, liquor storeowners reminded customers that if they use fake identification they could lose their driver's license.

NewsCenter 5's Sean Kelly reported Monday that the Registry of Motor Vehicles has the right to suspend a person's driving privileges if they are caught using fake identification.

Even without a conviction, the registrar can suspend driving privileges for six months if a person is caught transferring, altering or defacing a license, making or selling a false license or using someone else's license, according to the registry's Web site.

At Blanchards Wine and Spirits in Allston, officials post fake identification cards on the store's window. They have been confiscated by store managers. Manager Joe Gomes said that he takes the offense very seriously.

"If we sell to a minor, the employee who makes the sale is almost immediately fired. Terminated. End of discussion. The store can be fined. We can be shut down. It means everyone loses pay. It's serious. I could lose my job," Gomes said.
 
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