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MGL Ch 140, Section 129C, paragraph (o)

"Section 129C. No person, other than a licensed dealer or one who has been issued a license to carry a pistol or revolver or an exempt person as hereinafter described, shall own or possess any firearm, rifle, shotgun or ammunition unless he has been issued a firearm identification card by the licensing authority pursuant to the provisions of section one hundred and twenty-nine B....

The provisions of this section shall not apply to the following exempted persons and uses:

(o) Persons in the military or other service of any state or of the United States, and police officers and other peace officers of any jurisdiction, in the performance of their official duty or when duly authorized to possess them; "

So does this apply to Campus Police Officers and Private Security Special Police Officers as well?
 

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My input on the >21 year old with badge:

Such a case arose in my department, and although the officer may carry under his badge, the department decided that he would leave his gun at the station (in his locker's interior gun locker)...until he turned 21.

So he did, of course.
 

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Originally posted by Mike:
I have always wondered about a 20 year old who has never lived away from home, never been in the military, or whose only experience may have been in a dorm, can go to a serious domestic, or minor spat, and be able to tell the difference. My .o2 on that point.
But a 21 year old would be any different? Life experience is formed over the course of a lifetime. There is nothing about the year between your 20th birthday and your 21st birthday that suddenly makes you experienced. So, either you have to accept the fact that officers will have to gain life experience over the course of the job, or you have to not hire them until they are middle aged.

Another thing is that some people have a lot of life experience when they are 19, and others still don't have any when they are 30.

In any case, I don't think if you raised the minimum age to 21, you would suddenly have cops who are better able to deal with domestics, etc. etc.
 
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Heres my two cents. I was sworn as a fully powered police officer at the age of 17 when I was still in High School; I had the powers of arrest, just as any of the full timers. However, I never ever used those powers cause I was always with a full timer, mostly a sergeant, it was just there in case we needed it. Before that I was a law enforcement explorer for four years. Then at the age of 19, I was hired as a ft for six months for a local dept with a weapon that I left at the station. I'm now 20, still hired with the same department and I have the same responsibilities, if not more then some of the full timers.

I personally don't think the military or even college is going to give you "life experience" that is going to make you a good police officer. They could still be a total screwball. I've seen it. That’s why you should leave it to the dept to weed out whom they do and don't want, most dept's should know what they want, and if a 19 year old is better suited for the job then a 28 year old, then so be it.

~There, all better. It's been through spellcheck. I am in college classes, guess I proved me point, its obviously not doing anything for me. As you so kindly pointed out. :) ~
 

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Originally posted by SilverSnap:
i personally don't think the military or even college is gonna give you "life experience" that is gonna make you a good police officer.
But you might pick up some English courses which is "gonna" help you with your grammar.
 

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Experience is the only thing that is going to prepare you for what you are going to need on the job. I was a Police Officer at 19. I could have been better prepared before I started, but everyone is a rookie at one time or another. I made rookie mistakes, but benefited from them all. I am now 21. I am also enrolled in college. But nothing that is instructed in school prepares you for seeing the things that you will no doubt encounter.

I agree that a cop should be 21. How are you going to confiscate alcohol from a minor when you cannot even possess it yourself? (I know scope of duty, blah, blah- I mean morally). Should a cop be over 21, yes. Is it necessary, no. I have experienced things and learned more than 4 years of English classes and algebra could ever teach. It is not fair to count out all of the young guys. Some of us are dedicated, experienced and know the job better than some of those who have been around for a while.
 

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</font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Irishpride:
<strong> </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by SilverSnap:
<strong>i personally don't think the military or even college is gonna give you "life experience" that is gonna make you a good police officer.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">But you might pick up some English courses which is "gonna" help you with your grammar.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Well done Irishpride. lol. You saved me some typing when I read your posting.
 

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Like I said in the private email....easy to say that military does not count for life experience when you have never been there.

Tell a veteran that it does not count and see what he/she says. Its all what you put into it. You can be a slug on a police department and you can be a slug in the military. But the military is far less lenient with non compliants. Why dont you enlist and help the cause. You are young go help the country. See... you wont do it but you will reap the benefits that all the veterans laid down for you to live here and have the rights you are using now. enough said!!!
 

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I don't think anyone was attempted to lessen the value of being a veteran or the value of attending college. I think everything that you do opens you up to new experiences and teaches you new things. And I think everyone takes away something different from similar situations. But I don't think we can say the experience X, Y, and Z will produce a good cop and people without those will not succeed. Every person is an individual and must be judged in that manner. This is why, I believe, such intense interview and background procedures are in place; to determine the suitability of each applicant, their maturity, and their well roundedness.

Who knows the best applicant for a position maybe a 19 y.o. fresh HS grad, a recently separated member of the military, a college grad, or even an individual with a mid-life career change.

But I don't think we can cast blanket judgments on groups and determine their suitability in that way.

My
, I'll get off the
now.

Now wasn't the topic carrying under the badge?
 

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doesn't anyone see the inherrant danger of not carrying off duty. 19/20/21, it doesn't matter, if someone is a real cop they need to have the ability to have a firearm at all times. If this young cop does make a good on duty arrest, what does he do when he is out to dinner w/ mary-jane rotten crotch( and her pretty pink panties), and he see's the same skell he locked up 4 days ago, and now Mr. Skell wants too teach this young guy a lesson. The chances of this happening anywhere are fairly good. If the job does not trust someone to carry agun off-duty, then they should make them wait until they are older. This is nothing against young cops, just common sense. What good is a gun in your locker do you when the sh$# hits the fan?
 

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I know more Police officers are carrying off duty now a days then before. It's the way things are today, you just don't know what's going to happen while you are on a simple errand. Not to jump into everything one sees, but just in case there is no way out of the situation. I also see that officers who use to keep the badge in their wallets have started to keep them around their necks, hidden away in case of that situation you have to react, just pull it out from your shirt and there it is on the chain. I myself who kind of kept the weapon at home as time went by, have started to carry a small one around. Again, we (officers) don't like to get involved in things off duty for a few hundred reasons, but we may not get that choice.
 
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I'm an officer from the United Kingdom, and over here we can join as soon as we leave school, at age 18 1/2. I did this, and it was a steep learning curve indeed. I have nearly seven years service now, it really helped me to mature, but in the early days I made plenty of mistakes that I would put down to the eagerness of youth! :oops:

With regards to off duty carry etc, we can't carry anything when we're off duty, whether its baton, handcuffs or whatever. We aren't armed anyway, but even our firearms-qualified officers can't carry anything off duty either. My force has nearly 3,000 officers and out of those about 120 are firearms trained. There are about 12 armed officers on duty for the whole force at any given time.

Our force issues us with a small credit-card sized "warrant" card, which a lot of plain clothes officers wear round their necks on a chain. If you want a badge in a leather holder, you have to privately purchase them from headquarters! :(
 

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Okay now!

To stay on topic:

If you're a cop and under 21, it's a NO NO to carry off duty. Why?

1. You can't have an LTC
2. MGL Ch140/Sec 129 "in performance of their official duty or when duly authorized to possess them.

Sorry, but carry "under the badge" only means when you're on duty. Again, please stop perpetuating myths that may get people into hot water.

Quote case law to the contrary or STFU!
](*,)
 
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mpd, im not disagreeing with you, but "duly authorized" is somewhat broad (as most of the laws are and also open to interpretation). what exactly is duly authroized? being a police officer, but not on duty? only being on duty? when your police chief tells you its ok to carry off duty?
 
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