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A lot of it has to do with your decision making. There's a lot of situational questions that you'll have to try and work through. Just remember they want someone who's strong at decision making, not someone who's going to second guess what they do. So usually what happens is on the types of questions where it can go either way you sit there and you tell them your answer then they yell and scream at you trying to convince you as to why its wrong and you just defend your point. Theres a little more to it than that but in short stick to your point
 

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I agree with Bosox, I cant remember how many interviews Ive been in where they try and coerce me into changing my original answer to a scenario. Dont do it!! its a trick!!!! :wow:
 

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Also remember no department wants to hire a total cowboy/cowgirl. They know that if you pull over another P/O for a traffic offense that youre most likely gonna let them go with a warning. So dont try and gear yourself to "everyone gets a ticket" because its simply not true and they know you're lying if you say that.
I've been to 3 oral interviews and got hired in 2 of them. Not tooting my own horn here but just saying here's Some of the questions i've faced

1) What if youre on patrol on a midnight shift and you pull behind a warehouse to check it out. As you pull behind you see a man walking out of the warehouse with a box in his hand filled with stuff from inside the warehouse. As you get closer its your sergeant. what do you do?
Things to consider
(A) Does he have a right to be there? For all you know he is good friends with the person who owns the warehouse and the guy told him he was getting rid of a few things and he'd leave the box by the door later that night for him to pick up.
(B) Are you the brand new kid with 3 weeks on the street gonna approach this veteran officer about what you just saw or do you just let it go and go to the next person in command after you find out that no he wasnt supposed to be there
(C) Are you going to be able to suffer the consequences if you don't say anything at all to anyone about it and they find out. Remember bottom line is you still have your own job to protect too.

Another classic question is the "you pull your friend over and he's OUI what do you do?"

Can't help you too much here but realize if theres no accident, no injuries, there's other options for you. Park the car, take his keys, take him into protective custody call a friend to have him picked up. Most important thing is to get him off the road. And that doesnt mean he neccesarily needs to leave in cuffs in order to get the job done. Accident and injuries now thats a whole different ball game. Again don't risk a job that you've tried your whole life to get for this kid who decided to be stupid.

Other than that its a lot of the BS "what do you think makes a good police officer" "What can you bring to this department" stuff like that

Another thing to remember that people get hung up on...DONT BE A HERO. IF the situation calls for backup. Tell them youre gonna wait for backup. Even if its something so simple as an alarm at a residence during day shift. You get there and by yourself you check the doors and windows. You find a door on the side propped open. Step back to your car, move it to a position where you can observe and advise that you have an open door and are gonna wait for backup to arrive.




Good Luck in the process
 
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