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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Why is it the sheriffs in Boston can work details and the Boston PD is not afraid of them taking over?

Honestly, for all the talk and outright bashing, if the sheriffs really had no authority outside the jails why are they not being arrested for impersonating a police officer?

I agree they (unless they are retired LE),do not have the experience to do a police officers job. But for details the PDs cannot fill or in a diaster where you never have enough assets, why turn your back away from help. After all they have to have at a minimum an intermittent academy under their belt the same as most reserve officers.

Instead of bashing the Cheifs and the Sheriffs should get together and define what is needed and what is not. Face it, most of the threads I have read have people putting their own interpretation of the law. As long as Common Law is adheard to in MA the Sheriffs departments will operate in a grey area.:listen:
 

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They work details for the State Police and BPD. There is additional training needed to do these. Not everyone employed with Suffolk can just do them. You need to have certain requirements and training (NERPI, etc.). Know the facts before you comment.
 
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PMAC7272 said:
They work details for the State Police and BPD. There is additional training needed to do these. Not everyone employed with Suffolk can just do them. You need to have certain requirements and training (NERPI, etc.). Know the facts before you co

mment.
HEY bb59 there is no grey area deputy sherrifs can make arrests i know cause i am one and have made several arrests.Working inside a jail is like working a small city but everyone that lives there is a criminal. Stop bashing sherrifs!!! you would frappe your pants if you :cussing: worked were i work
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
17yrvet said:
HEY bb59 there is no grey area deputy sherrifs can make arrests i know cause i am one and have made several arrests.Working inside a jail is like working a small city but everyone that lives there is a criminal. Stop bashing sherrifs!!! you would frappe your pants if you :cussing: worked were i work
If you read my entire post you would see I want the sheriff bashing stopped. I mention Suffolk as an example that in that area sheriffs and local and State Pd can and do work together.

As far as training goes in the area I work and even from the posts I have read on this site it does not seem to me that inspite of what training a deputy would have he still would not be accepted as a LE in the minds of some.

Look at the law in the area of the MPTC they specifically exclude sheriffs, campus, State PD, enviromental. Now why would that be if we are one big happy family? And please don't say it is a money issue. That was knee jerk reaction to the Bristol County Sheriff patrolling New Bedford despite being told not to by the Mayor and PD.

And just for your information I know what it is like to work behind the walls I have worked in corrections for over a decade. I would like to see the legistlature really define once and for all what the Sheriff can do and not do.
 
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I have three yrs left i hate the job and i hate Criminals so i could care less about working the streets.
Where do you work in corrections?????
 

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You usually only see Sheriff's working details when the POlice can't fill them. And Suffolk county get a lot of details because the SP and BPD historically do not get along. So you will see SCSD working details for both police depts because neither the SP nor BPD want to give up details to eachother........At least this is the rumor floating out towards me that I hear over and over.
 

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17yrvet said:
HEY bb59 there is no grey area deputy sherrifs can make arrests i know cause i am one and have made several arrests.Working inside a jail is like working a small city but everyone that lives there is a criminal. Stop bashing sherrifs!!! you would frappe your pants if you :cussing: worked were i work
Next time your arresting someone, glance down at your badge or shoulder patch and learn how to spell SHERIFF correctly, that may stop some of the future sheriff bashing :)
 

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17yrvet said:
HEY bb59 there is no grey area deputy sherrifs can make arrests i know cause i am one and have made several arrests.Working inside a jail is like working a small city but everyone that lives there is a criminal. Stop bashing sherrifs!!! you would frappe your pants if you :cussing: worked were i work
Wow....he's made "several" arrests...

Gee....several...like two...three....no...not four? Yikes! Four??
 

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17yrvet said:
HEY bb59 there is no grey area deputy sherrifs can make arrests i know cause i am one and have made several arrests.Working inside a jail is like working a small city but everyone that lives there is a criminal. Stop bashing sherrifs!!! you would frappe your pants if you :cussing: worked were i work
Ya know... I respect Corrections guys but give me a break. It is not the "super scary" place many make it out to be. I doubt that anyone who has worked at a PD would be shaking with fear in a Prison.

Some of the people I worked with in Corrections shouldn't be trusted to flip burgers.
 

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bbelichick said:
I've seen some guys on PD's that don't belong...but in Corrections I saw a new level of bad.


This is as bad of a level as there is. It's unfortunate, but there are good and bad in all of our ranks.
 

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I was talking about a large percentage of incompetent, dirty and downright useless staff.

O'Hare is a deviant that slipped through the cracks. Many Corrections Depts make a policy of hiring bad seeds.
 

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The time to go has come for BSO's Jenne

BY FRED GRIMM

[email protected]

Let's make a deal.

Here's what you get: No arrest. No perp walk. No bond hearing.

Wait. There's more:

No trial. No guilty plea. No standing before some sneering judge admitting misdeeds and misdemeanors in a courtroom jammed with gloating reporters, while your political enemies dance in the hallway.

No jail. No manacles clinking between your legs as a bailiff escorts you to the very correctional institution that was once part of your domain -- a place where both jailer and jailee might harbor a grudge.

One more sweetener: No more of these constant revelations in The Miami Herald and Sun-Sentinel and New Times and the Daily Business Review, eating away at your once unassailable position as the most powerful elected official in Broward County, until ''sheriff'' in this county has become synonymous with a scandal-plagued political hack.

And don't forget: No felony conviction. You can still vote. Just not for yourself.

You get all that. In return, all we want is Ken Jenne's resignation.

A great deal. Resign and salvage a last bit of dignity before the federal prosecutors snatch it all away. Mind you, the U.S. attorney's office hasn't officially agreed to anything, but the feds are sometimes amenable to closing out a low-rent political corruption case if the miscreant agrees to give up elected office and just go away.

So just go away.

OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS

Besides, resignation would open up an opportunity to earn the big bucks you covet. Obviously, the $156,395 the public pays you to run the sheriff's department hasn't been enough. Your moonlighting escapades have revealed a man whose heart's in corporate security. At least two questionable ''consulting'' jobs enabled you to pick up more than a few extra bucks. One of BSO's equipment vendors paid you $4,000 to put together a training regime for Barbados -- a deal with lovely symmetry: BSO pays the vendor. The vendor pays you.

The Miami Herald's Wanda DeMarzo and Jay Weaver have also written about the nagging allegation, of special interest to federal prosecutors, that your deputies who actually put together the training program took BSO computers, training tapes, radios and satellite phones with them to Barbados. Cynics, of course, say that when Barbados got you, what Barbados really got wasn't your expertise so much as cheap access to BSO resources.

But you can resign and show them. Prove to the critics that what your clients really coveted was Ken Jenne himself, not a slick politician willing to toss in the amenities of a modern taxpayer-supported police force.

And you can show the wags that T&M Resources, which just happened to have a security consulting contract with the Seminole Indian Tribe while it was paying you $60,000 for ''consulting,'' really wanted Ken Jenne's expertise and not an inside peek into BSO's investigation of the shooting of tribal counsel Jim Shore.

TOUGH ROAD AHEAD

Resign. No need to admit that you're spooked knowing that famously tough federal prosecutor Pat Sullivan has been assigned to the investigation.

Sure, you and your upper cadre managed to pin BSO's inflated crime reporting scandal all on the peons, as if lowly road patrol deputies had dreamed up a mendacious scheme designed to make their bosses look brilliant.

You and your commanders avoided culpability, claiming you never noticed that your outrageous crime clearance numbers were too good to be true. That logic might have worked with the Broward state attorney's office, but the other investigation into your unseemly activities is being run by the U.S. attorney's office. The feds and Pat Sullivan might not be so naive in their pursuit of justice.

So just leave. We'll miss you. If there's no extradition treaty, maybe you could wrangle a job as sheriff of Barbados.
 

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Steroid-using officers seem to get free pass

BY FRED GRIMM

[email protected]

The steroid ring run by a state prison official was the shocking element in the Florida Department of Corrections scandal that didn't shock anyone. Steroids were already known as the illicit drug of choice within law enforcement.

Five guards were charged with possessing illegal steroids in January. Another prison official already had pleaded guilty to selling the stuff to fellow officers.

But I suspect it was the misuse of prison property or the drunken brawls by guards or the hiring of softball players for phantom jobs that actually undid the old-boy hierarchy at DOC.

The illegal use and sale of steroids within law enforcement hardly rates more than a shrug.

Consider the steroid mess that police officials in South Florida have been sorting out even as heads were rolling at DOC.

When the feds raided PowerMedica, an Internet pharmaceutical distributor based in Deerfield Beach in 2004, they discovered the names of eight Broward sheriff's deputies, four Palm Beach County deputies, 13 West Palm Beach city cops and three Delray Beach policemen on the company's list of regular customers.

PRESCRIBED DRUG

Most of the cops, including the Broward deputies, were cleared. So far, only two West Palm Beach officers have been punished -- with one-day suspensions.

The others appear to have found legal refuge in the company's sales gimmick: Customers fax over the results of a blood test. A company doctor, without laying eyes on the ''patient,'' knocks out a prescription for steroids.

Federal investigators said it was obvious that the scheme flouted the 1990 Anabolic Steroid Control Act. Somehow, what was obvious to the feds wasn't so obvious to the South Florida cops.

''I find this extremely difficult to understand and even more difficult to accept that members of this department would not have the same concerns,'' Delray Beach Police Chief Larry Schroeder wrote after an internal review of the steroid mess. Schroeder reluctantly cleared his officers.

Law enforcement already had a long, sordid history of involvement with the drugs that enable users to sculpt ordinary bodies into cartoon physiques, albeit with occasional bouts of 'roid rage. In South Florida, police steroid-use was cited in the infamous 1987 Miami River Cops scandal. Just last week, veteran Miami cop Francisco Pichel was charged with selling steroids.

In 1991, Larry J. Gaines, chairman of the criminal justice department at California State University at San Bernardino, wrote an article for the FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin warning: ``Anabolic steroid abuse by police officers is a serious problem.''

''Since then, I've received two or three calls a year about police steroid use from all parts of the country,'' he said Wednesday. ``It's still a problem, and no one is doing anything about it.''

AN ONGOING PROBLEM

Dr. Harrison Pope, director of the biological psychiatric laboratory at McClean's Hospital in Belmont, Mass., has studied the nonmedical use of steroids for two decades. Steroid use among police officers, he said, has surfaced ''again and again'' over the years.

''It's hardly surprising. Law officers can feel a need to be big and muscled and to defend themselves against possible assailants,'' said Pope, who can list a number of physical risks of steroid abuse.

Not all, but some users, he warned, can suffer profound and sometimes violent psychological effects.

''I'm not at all surprised that steroids are still being commonly used,'' he said. Pope noted the obvious, otherworldly pumped-up effect that steroid users -- especially police officers -- pretend has come from mere physical workouts.

''What does surprise me is that steroid users have been able to fool the public as long as they have,'' the doctor said.
 

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Former Palm Beach County deputy faces charges

Associated Press

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - A former Palm Beach County sheriff's deputy is charged with burglary and tampering with a witness.

Records state that David Carhart retired in January after accepting an early buyout package offered to veterans with more than 20 years of experience.

Carhart was arrested outside his ex-girlfriend's home on charges of burglary, two counts of tampering with a witness and violating a condition for his pretrial release for incidents related to a previous break-in at the woman's home.

A judge had barred Carhart from having contact with the woman. He was set to plead guilty this week to misdemeanor trespass and criminal mischief. Carhart was arrested in September for allegedly breaking into the home of another ex-girlfriend.

He faces up to 25 years in prison if convicted on the new counts.
 

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bbelichick said:
Former Palm Beach County deputy faces charges

Associated Press

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - A former Palm Beach County sheriff's deputy is charged with burglary and tampering with a witness.

Records state that David Carhart retired in January after accepting an early buyout package offered to veterans with more than 20 years of experience.
And he was a Detective Captain.
 

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bbelichick said:
The time to go has come for BSO's Jenne

So just leave. We'll miss you. If there's no extradition treaty, maybe you could wrangle a job as sheriff of Barbados.
I don't believe Jenne's been charged with anything, but many state he has ruined the Broward Sheriff's Office.
 

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I'm going to Boston for the test both written and physical. anyone here in the Suffolk County Sherrif Department ? . I was wondering if your pay/bennefits start in the academy ?
 

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The steroid thing is bad, but hey they didnt supply a drug dealer out of the state police evedence room. Remember Sgt. White , that happened in Ma. But yes I have seen my share of bad in corrections also. We could easly go back and forth .You seem like you are one of the good guys bbelechick so Just always remember never to become one of them and stay on the good side. They are the lowest of low and never were one of us..
 
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