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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
"Radar jammers are transmitters tuned to interfere with ("jam") a radar signal. The intentional use of jammers is considered "malicious interference" and is strictly prohibited by the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, as well as by FCC Rules. Anyone using a jammer risks such penalties as losing an FCC licenses, paying a fine, or facing criminal prosecution."

While looking for an answer in the ask-a-cop forum, I found the above, which answers the question about radar jammers being illegal. And let me tell you those FCC fines are massive!

See complete notice below:

PUBLIC NOTICE
FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION
Released: December 9, 1996 DA 96-2040

The FCC continues to receive many inquiries about regulations governing police radar, radar detectors, and other radar devices used to measure the speed of an object. This Notice explains the scope of FCC regulation over these devices. It updates and supersedes the Public Notice on the same subject dated August 1, 1985. Radar units are transceivers, i.e. they both transmit and receive a signal, and operate under rules for the Radiolocation Service contained in Part 90 of the FCC's Rules. As such, they are certified and authorized by the FCC under Parts 2 and 90 of the FCC's Rules. Part 90 specifies the frequencies and technical standards for radar units, but does not address how radar units are to be operated as devices to measure an object's speed. Also, the FCC Rules do not contain provisions concerning the calibration of radar units, the reliability of the readings, or operator capability requirements. Radar units are used by police and other public safety agencies to measure vehicle speeds. Under Part 90 of the rules, licensees in the Public Safety Radio Pool (such as state or local government entities), that already have a FCC license for a radio communications system, may operate radar units without obtaining a separate license for them. Radar units may also be used under Part 90 by non-public safety entities such as professional baseball teams, tennis clubs, automobile and boat racing organizations, private transportation firms, railroads, etc., to measure the speed of objects or vehicles. Non-public safety

users, however, are required to obtain a Part 90 license from the Commission for use of radar units. Additionally, many public safety agencies also operate unattended, low-power, transmit-only radar units under Part 15 of the FCC's Rules. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is the federal agency concerned with the enforcement of highway speed limits and with the operation of radar as enforcement tools. Information on NHTSA regulations concerning radar use can be obtained from the Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 400 Seventh St., S.W., Washington, D.C. 20590. Radar jammers are transmitters tuned to interfere with ("jam") a radar signal. The intentional use of jammers is considered "malicious interference" and is strictly prohibited by the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, as well as by FCC Rules. Anyone using a jammer risks such penalties as losing an FCC licenses, paying a fine, or facing criminal prosecution. Radar detectors are radio receivers tuned to receive radar signals and are used by motorists to provide a warning of any radar activity in the vicinity. In this regard, the FCC regulations pertaining to receivers do not address the subject of radar detectors. The use of radar detectors by members of the public, therefore, does not constitute in itself a violation of FCC Rules. Some jurisdictions, however, have local regulations or statutes concerning the use of radar detectors. Inquiries about such statutes should be directed to local law enforcement authorities. In summary, the FCC Rules regulate radar transmitting units but provide limited regulation over receivers, with the subject of radar detectors not being specifically addressed in the FCC Rules. For more information about the subject of this notice, contact the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, Public Safety and Private Wireless Division, at (202) 418-0680. FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION RADAR GUNS Title 47 Code of Federal Regulations - Telecommunications Part 90 - Private Land Mobile Radio Services Subpart H - Policies Governing the Assignment of Frequencies Rule 90.20 Public Safety Pool Rule Section 90.20(f)(4) states:

"A licensee of a radio station in this service may operate radio units for the purpose of determining distance, direction, speed, or position by means of a radiolocation device on any frequency available for radiolocation purposes without additional authorization from the Commission, provided type accepted equipment or equipment authorized pursuant to 90.203(b)(4) and (b)(5) of this part is used, and all other rule provisions are satisfied. A licensee in this service may also operate, subject to all of the foregoing conditions and on a secondary basis, radio units at fixed locations and in emergency vehicles that transmit on the frequency 24.10 GHz, both unmodulated continuous wave radio signals and modulated FM digital signals for the purpose of alerting motorists to hazardous driving conditions or the presence of an emergency vehicle. Unattended and continuous operation of such transmitters will be permitted." No Federal Communications Commission requirement exists that the make and model of the radar gun be recorded on the radio station license.
 

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Premarital sex is also illegal, but I don't think that will stop either. If some Bozo spends that kind of cash on that kind of equipment, then let the games begin. If Bozo gets caught then tweak his red nose and boot him in the butt.
 

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Ham radios i beleve fall under civilian emergency communications, or whatveer the fancy word is...
Reminds me of the laws about postal vehicles, and their ultimate right-of-way on the road, just a little clause for the few times it is necessary to use it against someone...
 

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Ham radios i beleve fall under civilian emergency communications, or whatveer the fancy word is...
Reminds me of the laws about postal vehicles, and their ultimate right-of-way on the road, just a little clause for the few times it is necessary to use it against someone...
I always steer clear of postal vehicles, especially after liquid lunch time.
 

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Just my two cents,

Having alot of experience in 2 Way radio repair and installations I was able to come up with one answer that may shed some light on this.

The listed law refers to "transmitters" also known as Active radar Jamming. If you notice when you see a "Jammer" for sale its always described as "Passive". The theory behind these passive jammers are that they take the Radar signal from the Radar gun and Mixes it with white noise. It then sends it back to the gun supposable with a result of either a false reading on the gun and or nothing at all. Also, FCC cannot have any interest in anything that does not have to do with Television/Radio waves, and where this unit does not "transmit" they have no authority to regulate them.

With this being said, I actually purchased one of these units and gave it a try. I had a Town cop I was friends with radar me 7 or 8 times (some with it on and some with it off) as I drove past him at different speeds.

The Result: The company claims that it "jams" radar is frankly bullshit. Each and every time I drove past him he was able to get an acurate reading. I do remember (remember this was about 7 years ago) that one or two of the times he said that it did take a while to get a reading (an extra 2 or 3 seconds) but no matter what he would have been able to catch me.

This test was with the First Generation (Spirit Brand) radar jammer. As a matter of fact I believe I still have the unit. I don't know how good the current generation units are but the whole theory of "passive" jamming just in my opinion does not work.

In order to successfully jam a radar signal (Radio Wave) is with an active unit (such as installing an electric door sensor under your front bumper In hopes of sending more signal than it can compute/handle) I have herd urban legends that it is possible to "blow out the radar guns receiver this way but again, I have never seen it, Throwing a massive amount of radiation around the car (Such as a solar flare much like we have NEVER HAD on earth. OR develop a car with Stealth Properties.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Just my two cents,
Also, FCC cannot have any interest in anything that does not have to do with Television/Radio waves, and where this unit does not "transmit" they have no authority to regulate them.
It is illegal to jam police radar. FCC has the authority and sent cease and desist orders to the manufacturers. In general, anything interfering with licensed operation is illegal, correct? So if the jammer is interfering with the radar device, it's illegal. So I guess if you are using a passive radar "jammer" that is crap and doesn't work (because it's not transmitting and not interfering with the signal) it's legal, but if you're using a jammer that is active and is interfering with the transmission it's illegal.

"Before going further, let us make the following statement; jamming or attempting to jam a police radar gun is a federal felony with fines up to $75,000. While radar jammers are marketed, speedlabs.com and our observations in El Paso show them to be totally ineffective, which is possibly the reason that their makers, while having been issued cease and desist orders by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), have not been prosecuted. There are federal statutes that make radar jammers illegal in all 50 states. California, Minnesota, and Utah specifically ban radar and laser jammers. (Radar jammers are banned by state law in the following states; Nebraska, Minnestota, Oklhoma, Virginia, Washington DC North Carolina, California and Utah) It's possible that laser jammers may become outlawed soon in other states as well." http://www.motortrend.com/features/consumer/112_0402_radar/index2.html

I dunno where Motortrend got thier information.

The FCC regulates both radar detectors and jammers, but not newer photo radar and laser beam technologies ... Jammers, however, are illegal. The FCC has ruled that manufacturing devices, such as jammers, that interfere with devices in other services are inappropriate. Most recently, in December, the FCC issued a cease and desist order to Rocky Mountain Radar of Colorado to stop making jammers. A 1997 paper prepared by the National Conference of State Legislatures.
 

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Let me tell you about the passive jammers, they are a scam. In order for a radar jammer to work it has to be active and has to put out more power than the radar unit, therefore interfering with it. Jammers are very expensive and probably hard to get, especially the ones that work.
 

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j809 @ 21 Sep 2004 02:57 said:
Let me tell you about the passive jammers, they are a scam. In order for a radar jammer to work it has to be active and has to put out more power than the radar unit, therefore interfering with it. Jammers are very expensive and probably hard to get, especially the ones that work.
Fuggin-eh right!!!
The only jammer I know that works 100% of the time is an EA-6B. Union you are an ass for buying anything less than that. Shame on you again goober-boy!
:p
 

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mpd61 @ Tue 21 Sep said:
j809 @ 21 Sep 2004 02:57 said:
Let me tell you about the passive jammers, they are a scam. In order for a radar jammer to work it has to be active and has to put out more power than the radar unit, therefore interfering with it. Jammers are very expensive and probably hard to get, especially the ones that work.
Fuggin-eh right!!!
The only jammer I know that works 100% of the time is an EA-6B. Union you are an ass for buying anything less than that. Shame on you again goober-boy!
:p
Hey! I was 18 or 19, I got better things to waste my money on nowadays. However, the thought of blowing out some unsuspecting cops radar gun even at this stage of my life is still somewhat intriguing :)
 

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Jam-Schmam: You can't jam VASCAR...sorry if I sound like a broken record...One could jam by broadcasting on the same freq at the same signal strength and set up a hetrodyne condition...

Subject for another day...VASCAR rules, radar(and LIDAR) drool!
 

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dcs2244 @ Thu 23 Sep said:
Jam-Schmam: You can't jam VASCAR...sorry if I sound like a broken record...One could jam by broadcasting on the same freq at the same signal strength and set up a hetrodyne condition...

Subject for another day...VASCAR rules, radar(and LIDAR) drool!
You start of by saying you "cant", then give a way to do it?

I dont care what a company claims, any radio frequency can be jammed, Just like any radio transmission can be received. Its just a law of nature.
 

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Sorry, since VASCAR is a time/distance computer, and emits no electromagnetic radiation, it can not be 'jammed'. I was referring to radar/lidar...sorry for the confusion. I will try to express myself more accurately in the future. :oops:
 

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I don't know if I'd 'rip it out'...but I would suggest to the citizen that it was "in violation of the FCC rules and regs, and if you don't want to take it out and smash it your self, I will be more than happy to alert the federal government...and you know how they are, what with the IRS audits and such..." :twisted:
 

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My response to jammers is checking that little box below radar "estimated" a 55mph reading that was jammed on radar causes a 65mph estimation!
 
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