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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Note the fact that this "corrections officer" is an employee of one of those private corporations that are now running jails. It's interesting they get details.

An off-duty corrections officer was shot in the neck Friday while moonlighting as a part-time security guard at a downtown San Diego nightclub, police said.The officer, who works for Corrections Corporation of America, was attempting to break up a fight that had spilled out onto the street outside the Static Lounge, 634 Broadway, at around 1 a.m. when the shooting occurred, San Diego police said.The shooter was not believed to be one of the people originally engaged in the fight, police said.
Two people were taken into custody for questioning, though it was not immediately clear whether one of them was the shooter, police said.The officer was hospitalized but his wound was not believed to be life-threatening, police said.
 

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Well isn't San Diego where they had the issues with the "special" cops who were buying burroughs and patrolling them with little to no training??
 

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Inspector,

May not be a detail per se. When I was a CO I had a part-time security job as well. Probably the same deal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I know sometimes the concept of "detail" gets mixed up with part-time security jobs. In places like New England most departments will not allow you to work security anywhere. You are assigned to a private duty by your department, with pay coming in your regular check. The detail assignments are covered by union contract in most of our departments, with seniority dictating the assignments.
I know in other parts of the country "private details" are more loosely handled with the department keeping out of the arrangement which is often made between the officers and the store, ball park or other place to be protected. The officers who work these "details" are considered "off duty." for all intent and purposes. I know this was the arrangement at a ball park down south where I have attended many games. The officers wear their uniforms but they are hired directly by the ball team. I know this leaves a lot of questions but that's the way it was explained by officers down there to me. If L.A. Cooper could enlighten us as to the California position on this it would help. The thing here is I am totally opposed to private companies taking over correctional institutions and police services to communities. The employees are answerable to the company and the company is responsible to the bottom line. This is far from my concept of policing where we are employed by the public to protect and serve the public.
 

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Inspector,

Here in Florida, while you are bound by department policy, for most departments it is similar to the "off duty" situation you describe. Officers/Troopers/Deputies act as schedulers, working with the companies and contractors to determine scheduling and pay rate. The scheduler (usually someone with rank who has contacts with the big contracting companies) then calls his people (no seniority system) and those people then submit an off duty request to admin, basically saying that the place doesn't violate certain restrictions and you agree to abide by department rules while working. Scheduler then submits time sheets to contractor, and scheduler then leaves you a pay check from the contractor once every few weeks. Basically, the department has nothing to do with the scheduling, administration, or pay rate. I work for one scheduler and make $45 per hour, and another at $35 per hour. For one man jobs, such as apartment complex's and jobs that only need one officer once and awhile, you basically become your own scheduler negotiating your own pay rate. Coming from Massachusetts, it's a strange system, but I haven't had any problems with it as of yet. Only down side is that unless you are acting in some sort of law enforcement function (arrest etc., ) you or the company is responsible for workman's comp. issues, and some departments make you pay mileage for using your take home to and from the job.
 
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