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As of right now, once POST takes effect, there will be only one certification in the Commonwealth; certified law enforcement officer. There will no longer be part-time vs. full-time certified officers, only certified officers, therefore, the bridge academy will certify reserve officers/deputy sheriffs/campus police officers as MA LEOs without having to attend a full-time academy. This is an excellent opportunity for reserves/deputy sheriffs/campus officers to obtain a, per se, full-time certification via the bridge academy without attending the full-time academy and would be eligible to be hired as a full-time municipal police officer without any further training. Full-time trained SSPOs will immediately become certified MA LEOs and eligible to be hired as full-time municipal officers as well. Reserves/deputy sheriffs/campus officers who choice not to attend the bridge academy or are not allowed to attend same will be decertified over the next three years by alphabetical order. This is an approximate estimation but last names ending in A-I have one year, J-R have two years, and S-Z have three years to complete the bridge academy or they will be decertified.

This has caused considerable concern for Sheriffs and Campus Police Chiefs in regards to retention of their officers but as of right now, their concerns have fallen on deaf ears. The unintended consequences of rushing through legislation without understanding the full affect of their actions.
 

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New here, but I have a question. What about reserve police officers that had the old reserve academy hours? (120 something hours I believe) but has been a reserve police officer for more than 20+ years. Are they eligible for the bridge academy?
 

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What they should have done is like other post states. Have different tiers. Traffic cones should do minimum reserve academy they have with inservice. You work in a cruiser then you need full time equivalent


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Discussion Starter · #206 ·
This is good. They also have to pass the physical and they do the PT in this new 9 month academy as they should be if they are going to be cops. I also heard that the bridge academy will not be enough to be a full time cop and mptc and post both said it was not the intention to be a replacement of a recruit academy but some towns are messing around and they heard about it


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Completely untrue in regards to PTers not being certified FT with the bridge academy. I have an officer working under waiver currently until bridge academy is offered and then will take one of our FT slots once completed.
 

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Completely untrue in regards to PTers not being certified FT with the bridge academy. I have an officer working under waiver currently until bridge academy is offered and then will take one of our FT slots once completed.
That is the problem. Departments are trying to circumvent recruit academies by taking part time trained people with a bridge academy and making them full time. This is why they’re looking at this problem very seriously. Also read the law 41-96B. It’s kind of reminiscent when civilian inspectors in the Registry were merged in the MSP and almost all of them had no police academy training.


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Discussion Starter · #208 ·
That is the problem. Departments are trying to circumvent recruit academies by taking part time trained people with a bridge academy and making them full time. This is why they’re looking at this problem very seriously. Also read the law 41-96B. It’s kind of reminiscent when civilian inspectors in the Registry were merged in the MSP and almost all of them had no police academy training.


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A lot of PT officers are already doing the job though. What I mean, is that in a small town, it’s not uncommon for PTers to be on the road by themselves. A lot of small towns have good, capable PT officers, performing the same tasks as a FT officer during their shift. So to give them additional training, and allowing them to go FT, I’m not sure I see “the problem.” If anything the small towns will struggle to retain anyone (part time) because it will allow their guys to seek FT positions elsewhere.

If you’re referring to an auxiliary who’s been doing nothing but details for the past 10 years with his reserve academy, then I can kind of see the argument, but a simple interview would weed those guys out?

The only thing I see at this point is lack of physical training which can be easily overcome by a hiring agency simply instituting a Cooper test or an obstacle course prior to employment.
 

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This will certainly be interesting to see what will happen with the rule 400/400a agencies and their equivalents (I know Springfield swears in SPO’s and they’re fairly common in the city). I’m guessing that security companies are going to have to hire guys who have gone through a full academy or pay for them to go to one if they want police powers. We have the same situation in NC (they call them special police or company police here). They have to go through a full academy and then have full police powers on the properties they’re hired to guard.

Of course the problem is, the full academy is way too expensive for these private companies to send people through. The only company I’ve ever heard of sponsoring is G4S, who has a huge contract to be the transit police for the Charlotte transit authority. Of course, this means that the companies have to rely on hiring self-sponsors or retired cops from other agencies. Problem being, nobody really wants to work there, so they lose most new hires within a few months to a city/county/university, and end up with just the retired guys who have no desire or do any police work and just want an extra check on the side (can’t blame them, I’ll be the same way when I get out).

BPD is going to have a ton of extra work to pick up if all the 400/400a agencies don’t have arrest powers anymore. Armed security, to my understanding at least, has no real authority in MA, so they’re basically going to be scarecrows with guns.
 

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It’s kind of reminiscent when civilian inspectors in the Registry were merged in the MSP and almost all of them had no police academy training.
Not even close to being true.

The RMV Police ran their own FT MCJTC-approved academy at Needham for many years, where they trained not only RMV recruits, but also city and town recruits.

Don’t drink the circa-1992 SPAM Kool-Aid, Registry Inspectors were absolutely academy trained. With statewide authority, they better have been.
 

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BPD is going to have a ton of extra work to pick up if all the 400/400a agencies don’t have arrest powers anymore. Armed security, to my understanding at least, has no real authority in MA, so they’re basically going to be scarecrows with guns.
It will actually be somewhat amusing, as the Boston Police Union has railed for years against any entity other than themselves that have arrest powers in the city.

This could turn into a perfect example of “Be careful what you wish for, because you may get it”.
 

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Not even close to being true.

The RMV Police ran their own FT MCJTC-approved academy at Needham for many years, where they trained not only RMV recruits, but also city and town recruits.

Don’t drink the circa-1992 SPAM Kool-Aid, Registry Inspectors were absolutely academy trained. With statewide authority, they better have been.
Not true at all. Yes some had an academy but before the merger in order for the union to bolster its numbers, merged many civilians into the police and called them inspectors. At the merger many had no academy at all and they had to do a special 6 or 8 weeks class for them at the SPA. Now MDC police was squared away and the capital cops all had academies.


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Yes but they appointed many civilians as inspectors before the merger. Then they were troopers with no training. Trust me I know people


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Not true at all. Yes some had an academy but before the merger in order for the union to bolster its numbers, merged many civilians into the police and called them inspectors. At the merger many had no academy at all and they had to do a special 6 or 8 weeks class for them at the SPA. Now MDC police was squared away and the capital cops all had academies.


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Again, don’t drink the SPAM Kool-Aid.

Name one RMV Inspector who didn’t have the FT Academy, and the date and location of this mythical 6-8 week “academy” that made civilians into troopers. I’ll be more than pleased to file a public records request and pay the duplication fees to confirm it.

HINT: You can’t.
 

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Reserve academies in their current form, will no longer be offered. The new POST curriculum will require all recruits to either attend the full-time academy on a full-time basis or the full-time academy on an intermittent basis. In the end, both curriculums will be the same as far as hours, courses, firearms, DT, etc. The difference is one will be completed 40hrs per week while the other will be completed on a part-time basis, consisting of some nights and weekends. This allows for those with full-time jobs to pursue a law enforcement career, while working their regular job. This is common in many other states.
Yep, that's what we did when I went through the academy in PA. Same curriculum, same hours, same everything except my class was 4 hours a night, 4 nights a week, plus 9 Sundays of firearms training, all spread out over 48 weeks. The academy training is good for life there too. After graduation, you need to take the state certification test (which is pretty easy overall) and the test is good for 2 years. If you don't get hired within 2 years, you need to take the test again, but your academy is still good, unless hours have been added, in which case you need to make up the extra hours to take the test again.
 

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New here, but I have a question. What about reserve police officers that had the old reserve academy hours? (120 something hours I believe) but has been a reserve police officer for more than 20+ years. Are they eligible for the bridge academy?
Everyone with a reserve/intermittent level academy will be eligible for the bridge academy, I believe, regardless of when the officer attended the original academy.
 

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Everyone with a reserve/intermittent level academy will be eligible for the bridge academy, I believe, regardless of when the officer attended the original academy.
This is probably a stupid question, but I'm assuming that the bridge academy is only for those who are already on the job as reserve officers, or who have completed the academy in the past two years. Not those of us whose MA R/I academy has lapsed.
 
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