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Re: Police Detail slashed in transportation refrom pitch

I don't get it, why do you guys think that drivers won't stop for flagmen there in Massachusetts? .
In other states, drivers learned when they got their license at 16, that they had to stop, and follow the direction of flag men. It's part of their life, and it's all they know and are used to. In Mass, they barely stop for police officers. A flag man would be something new that they are not accustomed to. They would be looked at as someone less than a school crossing guard, which most people only stop for because kids are involved, and the chance that a police officer might be in the area. Most of them will try passing a school bus with flashing red lights. When people are running late, which most people are now a days, they aren't going to let some civilian flag man delay them. Who are the flag men going to call for enforcement when drivers don't stop? What police officer is going to set up enforcement activities at these construction sites to ensure drivers are stopping and obeying flag men? With no traffic law enforcement in these construction areas, the problem will only grow worse. I do believe the politicians will see the light before they open Pandora's box. Surely, they're not that foolish.
 

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Re: Police Detail slashed in transportation refrom pitch

They did try and pull a fast one, trying to sneak it in without anyone knowing. I've never seen this state move so fast before. Mass politics at it's finest.

From what I've been hearing from the upper end of the greap vine, it seems as though it will end up in the hands of the individual cities and towns.
I don't know how this will affect the SP at this time though.

Sure, you're going to get the city councilors that dislike the police etc.
When it comes down to it, the mayors and city managers realize that there are hundreds of extra cops on the street throughout the day that are not costing the taxpayers a dime.

Don't leave for Montana just yet.
 

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Not surprisingly, the Quin bill was brought up. They said they're going after this next because the state simply can't afford it anymore. They're going to set up a cut off date. Those hired after a certain point will not get the benefit. Everyone else will be grandfathered in, providing they're at least enrolled.

You may still have it in your contract with your cities and towns paying for it, but how long do you think that would last considering the current state of affairs? It might be in the current contract, but will it be in the next, or the one after? If I were new on the job, I would be enrolling in a class or two just in case.

There is no set date in place for this yet, but the current regime did say that this is the next battle they were going to fight. I'm sure the public will have plenty to say as well. Stand by to stand by.
 

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So basically, the State Police generally keep their details, and cities and towns are going to lose a lot of theirs (eventually) , just as was predicted above...
Everyone loses. Most of the old MDC roads and parkways in metro Boston are below 45mph, all are state details.
You young guys should get into school. Good sources say they are going after the Quinn Bill next. Get yourself grandfathered in.

What departments did in fact endorse this clown?
 

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Here's another. It happens all the time.

Cambridge -

A bold burglar couldn't stop bragging to police that he ransacked a Dana Street home and carted away his loot - including electronics and packs of hot dogs - in the victim's station wagon while she slept.
Police said 19-year-old Kai Kruger - who was arrested last Thursday morning for the break-in heist - is a suspect in a rash of recent housebreaks in the East Cambridge and mid-Cambridge, according to police reports.
Kruger allegedly robbed the 39-year-old Dana Street woman's house Aug. 28, sometime between 3:30 a.m. and 7 a.m., while the victim slept upstairs.
The victim told police she came down to the first floor of her house for a glass of water at 3:30 a.m. and everything appeared normal, but when she went downstairs again at 7 a.m. after showering, she found the kitchen back door open and her valuables stolen, including her car.
The victim told police the burglar had ransacked the first floor and basement of her home, checking all the cabinets and drawers and leaving them ajar before stealing a Mac Air laptop computer, a wallet, a Sony video camera, a checkbook, and four sets of keys to the victim's office, home and two cars, according to police reports.
Police said Kruger allegedly also tried to steal a 46-inch flat panel television mounted to the wall in the basement of the Dana Street home. The television was removed from its mount but left on an ottoman with the cords still attached, according to police reports.
Then, Kruger allegedly swiped the keys to the victim's green 1997 Volvo 850 station wagon from the front entranceway and drove off with the other stolen loot, including two packages of Hebrew National beef franks that police later found on the front seat of the stolen car.
Later that day at about 10:30 a.m., Police Officer Chris Samuel was working a police detail when he noticed the stolen Volvo parked in front of 76 Grozier Road; the front left tire was torn completely off its rim, according to police reports.
Suspecting that Kruger could be involved in the Dana Street break-in, Sgt. Antonio Ayala went to Kruger's house nearby at 69 Grozier Road. When Ayala looked over the fence, he allegedly spotted Kruger sorting through numerous items, including the stolen Whole Food canvas shopping bag, on the back porch.
In the Dana Street break-in, the burglar had dumped the contents of a canvas Whole Foods shopping bag on a sofa chair in the basement and had presumably taken the bag to carry away other stolen goods from the home, according to police reports.
Police officers arrested Kruger and read him his Miranda rights, but Kruger allegedly admitted he broke into the Dana Street home through an open back door and ransacked the apartment as he stole items from the house.
A tow truck driver in charge of bringing back the stolen Volvo said Kruger told him he took the hot dogs from the victim's refrigerator and planned to have a cookout, according to police reports.
Police read Kruger his Miranda rights again at the police station, but Kruger couldn't stop talking about his alleged crimes, according to police reports. On the way to his holding cell at the police station, Kruger spotted the bike found outside the Dana Street home and told police he stole it, but did not remember where he stole it because he was drunk at the time.
Earlier in the day, police seized a 15-speed bicycle from in front of the burglarized Dana Street house, suspecting that it belonged to the person who broke into the house, according to police reports.
Kruger faces charges of unarmed burglary, possession of a Class B drug, larceny over $250, larceny of a motor vehicle, receiving stolen property over $250 and driving with a suspended license.
A Grozier Road resident told police Kruger pulled up to 76 Grozier Road in the stolen green Volvo station wagon at about 5:30 a.m. Aug. 28, fell asleep in the car and then got out of the car and crossed the street to 65 Grozier Road a short time later.
Police also said Kruger's driver's license was suspended in January after he was found guilty for possession of a Class D drug in Littleton, according to reports.
Kruger was also charged with possession of a Class B drug after a detective allegedly found a small amount of cocaine during a search of Kruger's home.
 
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