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Re: Police Detail slashed in transportation refrom pitch

Well, since this new plan is set to be in place within the next 2 to 3 months.. I suppose I'll immediately begin my zero tolerance, everyone gets a citation, everyone gets charged plan! There is, after all, a 2 to 3 month turn around on court time!
 

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Re: Police Detail slashed in transportation refrom pitch

I also wish them luck in receiving permission to close down a roadway. Where I work, this can only be done after the detail officer develops an alternative traffic pattern (rerouting) that will not hinder public safety (police, fire, ems), proposes the plan to a supervisor (Sgt. or above), and the supervisor authorizes the request. It is only on rare occasions (almost never) that a supervisor will deny a detail officer's request to alter the traffic pattern. This is because the supervisor knows that the officer's primary concerns are public safety and flow of traffic. A flagger hired/employed by the construction company will have only one interest in mind, and that will be to do whatever said company wants in order to ensure that the company continues to hire/employ them. I can see this causing a heavy burden on us; we will have to visit these construction sites in order to correct the set up. Of course, if the plan ever passes, I'm sure most of us won't mind showing up at the site and requiring the company to spend an hour + moving equipment around and revamping their falty traffic pattern, all in the interest of public safety!
 

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My daddy could beat up your daddy.. blah, blah, blah. The way to defeat issues such as this one is through unity and strength in numbers. We should be focused on pointing out the benefits of police details, as was the case early in this thread, not the negatives. Some make mention of feeding the media with "ammo" but fail to realize that they too, through their posts on this site, are in fact feeding this "ammo" to the media. I guess it is easier to point fingers and pass blame. Not everyone is perfect and we know that there will always be that 10%. Not everyone you pass on a detail that is in the cruiser or on the cell phone is a shit bag either. Perhaps that officer is in the cruiser due to safety reasons, i.e. what good would it do to stand between your cruiser and the roadway with vehicles passing in excess of 60 mph? They barely see the cruiser lights before they are on top of you, do you think they will see you under the cover of darkness and blue led's? Perhaps that officer on the cell phone was making just a brief phone call and you just happened to drive by during his 30 second conversation. He may have been having a conversation concerning an emergency with a child at school, a supervisor who directed him to call, or maybe he was contacting the detail Sergeant to request additional detail officers for an unsafe site. I do not do road jobs, my court time is more than sufficient, but I certainly do not want to lose them. But, to Ryan, I appologize on behalf of all the shit bag officers and troopers who could never walk a day in your shoes (according to you, that is all of them).
 

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Civilian road detail flaggers will need plenty of training

By David Maril
Enterprise staff writer
Posted Aug 16, 2008 @ 11:24 PM
BROCKTON -
With money in the state budget tight, Governor Deval Patrick is wise to look for ways to save on expenses. His idea, however, of trimming expenses by replacing higher paid law enforcement officers with civilians on secondary road traffic work details is raising safety concerns.
Even on low-speed roads that do not handle heavy traffic, you have to wonder if there would be more vehicle accidents because of inexperienced personnel.
If Patrick's plan is to succeed, it's imperative that anyone hired for these details be put through a comprehensive training program to learn time-tested procedures for the type of traffic flow we've come to expect.
Here are a few mandatory skills for this type of work new personnel should be required to learn before they put on their orange safety vests for the first time at these low-traffic remote areas.
Master the art of sitting in an air-conditioned car for several hours and not having the engine overheat. In the winter, getting the most economic use out of the heater is the key. Tune up reading skills so they can make it through at least half a book each shift. Social skills must be sharpened so they can carry on non-stop conversations with the street construction workers. It's their duty to be up on the latest jokes and well-versed in sports updates. Practice blending in with the workers so there's little chance of having to deal with annoying questions from the public. Learn to avoid communicating with drivers. If someone even looks as if they may be on the verge of beginning to roll down a window, flaggers must learn to turn their backs and walk away quickly. A key lesson they will have to learn is how to vary demeanor, looking totally disinterested one minute and then appearing to be scrutinizing cars for suspects on the FBI's top 10 most-wanted list. It's imperative to always make sure the construction warning signs are close enough to the work area so drivers will not have any detour options. If there's not much traffic, there's less potential for more road construction detail work. Detail workers must learn to keep cell phone charged so they can talk for hours with family, friends and business associates. If forced to get out of their cars and direct traffic in a situation with opposite direction lanes merging into one, flaggers must learn to hold their ground and not be influenced by traffic flow. Even if there are three times as many cars coming in one direction, it's traditional to give each side the same amount of time to proceed. A traffic backup one mile in one direction while the other side is clear is an impressive badge of honor. Flaggers should never lose sight of the power those slow-stop reversible signs possesses. Most importantly, when flaggers leave the comforts of their cars and position themselves near the road, they must establish control and authority. If a vehicle is moving slowly, wave at the driver to speed up. If a car or truck is moving at a moderate speed, signal for them to slow down. Always remind the driver who is in charge. I don't know, the more I think about it, Patrick may be taking a chance even considering using civilians on these low-traffic, remote locations. It's not going to be easy to maintain the type of traffic flow we've come to expect.
David Maril can be reached at [email protected]

http://www.enterprisenews.com/opini...ggers-will-need-plenty-of-training?view=print
 

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Why is that flagger in the above picture not paying attention to, or directing, traffic??? Good thing there is a police officer nearby.. I bet that he would respond and assist in an emergency despite the fact he is off duty.
 
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