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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I noticed that the Plymouth County Sheriffs Dept. was hiring. How well do they pay? Base pay (without details), does it compare to the D.O.C?
 

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I don't know what Deputies make there, but from their site I found this statement in regards to the training of Deputies and I find it extremely funny. All deputies are required to complete the rigourous 13-week Reserve Intermittent Training Academy administered by the Massachusetts Criminal Justice Training Council. "rigourous" :L:
 

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If it were anymore layed back I would have fallen asleep, although it was good experience!

It was about as rigorous as taking a Sunday afternoon nap. :D
 

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holding a re-election sign or donating $$$ to the present sheriff (a democ rat) should get you a job - look at this particular individual's history...... :roll: what ever happened to merit, qualifications and honor........... if you want integrity and honor restored to the sheriff's dept - vote Republican - all you need to do is look at the democ rat party's platform and their history in dealing with law enforcement - ie- the bachman bill, etc.......
 
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Having started my career by going to a Reserve Academy I understand that the term "rigorous" just does not apply to running 5-10 miles every other day and doing push ups. The majority of the students at the reserve academy have full time jobs, family commitments, and other issues to deal with daily while attending the reserve academy. I have never met a reserve student who was getting paid to go to the academy. So consider a 40+ hour a week job, family life, and the daily issues along with the reserve training and you might agree that the term rigorous is acceptable.
 

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I do have to say, I think the term "rigorous" in context to the Reserve Academy refers to the difficulty of staying awake during various classes you attend while going to work or school during the same period.
 

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maybe i misread malawman's post.... i don't remember running - or discipline - as being part of a reserve officer's academy...... r/i was easy and fun - full time officers academies
vary on difficulty on where and when you go - some are relatively easy - some are very difficult - depending on the current staff, etc..... part time classes are always easy
 
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I do not believe you misread my posting on this subject. I do believe that you have a problem comprehending my posting. The Reserve Academy as it stands by itself is not extremely difficult for a motivated person of reasonable intelligence. The majority of people attending the Reserve Academy also work full time at other jobs, (remember reserves are not paid to go to the academy) this along with family commitments, and other daily issues, combined with the time commitments needed for the reserve academy cause stress and strain on a students professional and personal life. This is why I believe that the word “rigorous” is acceptable in describing the Reserve Academy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I agree, the reserve academy was not that rigorous but my question was how much does a Plymouth County screw make compared to D.O.C. C.O.s? I work for the D.O.C. and I was just curious what the county jacks make. I am always looking for more money.
 

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MALawman said:
Having started my career by going to a Reserve Academy I understand that the term "rigorous" just does not apply to running 5-10 miles every other day and doing push ups. The majority of the students at the reserve academy have full time jobs, family commitments, and other issues to deal with daily while attending the reserve academy. I have never met a reserve student who was getting paid to go to the academy. So consider a 40+ hour a week job, family life, and the daily issues along with the reserve training and you might agree that the term rigorous is acceptable.
Lemme think...I was working a full time job too...Nope, still not rigorous. Calling that academy "rigorous" is REALLY stretching the term. Maybe like watching Tv for an hour is a "rigorous" workout.
 

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MALawman said:
I do not believe you misread my posting on this subject. I do believe that you have a problem comprehending my posting. The Reserve Academy as it stands by itself is not extremely difficult for a motivated person of reasonable intelligence. The majority of people attending the Reserve Academy also work full time at other jobs, (remember reserves are not paid to go to the academy) this along with family commitments, and other daily issues, combined with the time commitments needed for the reserve academy cause stress and strain on a students professional and personal life. This is why I believe that the word "rigorous" is acceptable in describing the Reserve Academy.
Well, I am curious, how would you describe having a family an other commitments, a mortgage, car payments, etc...and still attending the 16 hour a day, 5 day a week live-in academy at New Braintree? With actual PT, Drill, Academics and Discipline? I would term that experience as a "rigorous" academy. Calling the R/I Academy "rigorous" is insulting to anyone who went through Parris Island or anything else that is actually tough.
 
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The term rigorous means manifesting, exercising, or favoring rigor and the word rigor means a condition that makes life difficult, challenging, or uncomfortable;

In my humble opinion the reserve academy was and is rigorous based upon the statements I mentioned in an earlier posting. If you are asking my opinion of the degree of rigorous on a scale of 1 to 10 the reserve academy is compared to the State Police Academy I cannot answer that. I have never had the desire to be a state trooper. I would guess that since you are a member of the MSP your opinion is that the RTT is the most rigorous in the whole wide world.

I cannot understand why you would say "Calling the R/I Academy "rigorous" is insulting to anyone who went through Parris Island or anything else that is actually tough." Everyone is entitled to their opinions and beliefs. I don't feel that I must tell the world that I drive the fastest car, have the nicest job, or work for the best agency in the world. I have confidence in my own abilities, experiences, and training. I do not need people to be impressed in what I am, because I have the confidence in who I am.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
What the @#&* was that all about? The hardest thing about the R/I was showing up 3 nights a week.
 

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:roll: the reserve academy was easy.. everyone i went through it with had a full time job and most had a family. "rigorous" is hyperbole when describing a part time academy that only requires 2 brief sessions during the week and part of a Saturday..... i think earning a degree for the Quinn Bill while having a full time job and having a family is far more "rigorous" - i don't remember doing any research papers in the p/i class..
 

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The bottom line? Anyone who has attended that R/I academy that I know has laughed at that joke of an Academy. The fact that the Sheriff has the gall to call it "rigorous" just goes further to prove what a lying political hack he is.
I attended the Plymouth R/I academy, and since then, I attended and completed the San Diego County, California POST certified Animal Services Academy (Animal Control). The animal control academy was a 16 week, 640 hour FT academy that actually included PT. We ran 4 miles 3 times a week, did push ups, etc. We did our defensive tactics and handcuffing etc. along side the Sheriffs recruits, and did our firearms training with SDPD at their range. It certainly wasnt the MSP academy, but it was certainly was much tougher than the R/I academy.

The R/I academy is a good course for basic information. But as far as content, it is far from rigorous.
 

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ejk55 said:
........but my question was how much does a Plymouth County screw make compared to D.O.C. C.O.s? I work for the D.O.C. and I was just curious what the county jacks make. I am always looking for more money.
I'm under the impression that PCSO starts their CO's around $38K (bennies are pretty much the same), so it would be a little less than DOC. I've heard that that the big perk there compared to DOC is that PCSO CO's are on a 4 on 2 off schedule so they have rotating days off. BTW is there an open posting for this position, if so could you post the link?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for the info. 4 on and 2 off sounds nice but only 38 to start is a little low. However, I do believe they do details so that is a perk. I wish that we (D.O.C.) could do details. Then I could be making some serious coin.
 
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Actually the figures given are not true. PCSD starts at approx. $42,500 and on a five day work week. The other benefits are very good (90% health) plus many others. Call HR as soon as possible to find out if they are still accepting apps.
 

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its election time - hold a sign , donate some $$$ to his campaignand be a suck up and the current sherrif will appoint you. qualifications do not matter to this particular jamoke. he is a joke. thats why no police department in plymouth county that i know of takes a deputy seriously. its unfortunate, but you can't tell by their uniform who is a legitimate deputy (aka:before mcdonough) and who got their position by being a sign holding suck up. the plymouth county sherrifs departments credibility has never been lower
 
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