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I took the NYPD Test in Boston back in November. I was just wondering if anyone went through the process with the NYPD, and what it was like.
 

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It includes alot of trips to NYC.... and after they complete your background, BE READY!! They'll call you on a thursday to tell you to be there Monday morning for the academy. I worked with 2 guys and they both went to NYPD at different times, and both times it occurred in the same fashion.
 

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SOM98";p="58261 said:
I took the NYPD Test in Boston back in November. I was just wondering if anyone went through the process with the NYPD, and what it was like.
Although I don't know too much about the process but I figured I'd post the below story so you can get an overview of their hiring practices, good luck.

New York Daily News - http://www.nydailynews.com
Black marks in blue
By ALISON GENDAR
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER
Thursday, March 3rd, 2005


Hungry for new recruits, the NYPD is hiring applicants with arrest records and shoving others through without full background checks, the Daily News has learned.
In recent years, the Police Department has knowingly hired New Yorkers who have been charged with laundering drug money, assault, grand larceny and weapons possession, according to documents and sources familiar with the recruiting.

The News reviewed a February report by the city's Commission to Combat Police Corruption that details many of the problems. The report found:

One of every five probationary cops in the January 2003 Police Academy class who were reviewed by the commission should have been disqualified by NYPD hiring standards.

One of every four of the same group should have been more closely investigated because of "negative information" in their backgrounds.

Half of the cops may not have met the NYPD residency requirements. The department never completed a full check before the recruits were hired.

The NYPD often failed to conduct full background checks, such as interviewing ex-wives and girlfriends.
"We are hiring people to be cops who have no respect for the law," said former NYPD Sgt. Anthony Petroglia, who worked in the department's applicant processing division for nearly 10 years before retiring in 2002.

"We are hiring people who were charged with crimes that get you thrown off the force if you do them in uniform," he said. "All we are doing is buying trouble for the future."

The News obtained the paperwork of half a dozen troubling hires, who were allowed to join the force. They include:

A man who admits he shot up anabolic steroids for years.

A candidate fired from Macy's for allegedly stealing.

A recruit who was fired from a security job because he repeatedly failed to show up and was habitually late.
NYPD investigators flagged many of the questionable recruits because of their arrest records or shady past. But after a review, police brass welcomed them to the ranks of the Finest.

NYPD Chief of Personnel Rafael Pineiro said the cases reviewed by The News were carefully vetted and met department standards.

In each case, the recruit's arrests - which included robbery, weapons possession and assault - were dismissed or pleaded down to less serious violations.

"I feel comfortable with these cases," Pineiro said. "We have certain standards and we met them."

Pineiro rejected the city commission's contention that much of the Class of 2003 should have been disqualified. But he conceded that extensive residency checks - where investigators talk with neighbors of recruits - may not be finished when new hires enter the Police Academy. He added that investigators do interview neighbors by phone before a candidate is hired.

NYPD officials argued that the quality of recruits was improving. Pineiro said 58% of the Police Academy class have an associate's degree or better. In addition, 33,000 people took the NYPD test last year, the most since 1993.

"We have hired some 8,000 candidates in the past 3-1/2 years," Pineiro said. "A handful of questions out of 8,000 is not a problem."

There is little dispute the NYPD is experiencing a brain drain. More than 10,500 veteran cops have retired from the force since 2001. An additional 3,477 cops have quit over the same period, with many jumping to higher-paying police jobs.

Patrick Lynch, president of the Patrolmen's Benevolent Association, said the NYPD will have to accept marginal recruits until the city gives cops a raise.

"Younger, well-qualified candidates are choosing other opportunities because they can't make a livable wage as aNew York City police officer," he said. "The result is people are becoming cops who should not."

Cops have been without a contract since August 2002.

NYPD hiring guidelines require candidates to be rejected if they have any conviction within two years, if the initial charge was a felony; more than one conviction in the past two to five years, if the initial charge was a felony, or more than two felony-based convictions over five years. Recruits also can get blacklisted if they have more than three moving violations in less than two years.

"It's all judgment calls - bad ones," said a retired cop who worked nearly a decade in the applicant processing division. "But the bosses say, 'Send 'em through. We'll catch the problem ones later.'
 

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SOM98";p="58261 said:
I took the NYPD Test in Boston back in November. I was just wondering if anyone went through the process with the NYPD, and what it was like.
I tested and was excepted for the Dec 03 class and turned it down because was hired in Mass at the same time. First if you have a good back round investigator he will keep you up to date on up coming Academy classes if not you will receive that last minute call. Be prepared to have your medical and application process done on the same day. After you fill your App by hand they will hand you a large envelope containing the same app for you to take home and return it back to them. Also the PAT is alot harder then Mass... Any other question's feel free to contact me....
 

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March 10, 2005 -- More than one-third of the cops joining the Nassau County police tomorrow quit the ranks of New York's Finest for greener suburban pastures, The Post has learned.

Lured primarily by the prospect of higher pay, 53 of the 144 recruits scheduled to enter the Nassau police academy tomorrow have surrendered their NYPD badges, sources said.

Of these 53 former NYPD cops, four dropped out of the current Police Academy class of 1,757 that started in January.

That bad bit of NYPD news was followed by another bitter pill - 14 other NYPD cops have quit to join a new class of 248 FDNY probationary firefighters who began a 13-week training course this week, sources said.

Patrick Lynch, president of the Patrolmen's Benevolent Association, termed the "mass exodus" of cops quitting the NYPD a "crisis" that is costing the Big Apple millions of dollars.

"You have people who are leaving positions of authority or rank - whether detective or sergeant - to become a police officer and go down in rank but to go up in pay," Lynch said.

The starting pay for a Nassau recruit is $23,000, but within about six years, they earn $84,979 and the average Nassau cop earns about $100,000, or a bit less than that of an NYPD captain, sources said.

"We have an attrition rate of just 2 percent, which no Fortune 500 can claim," said Paul Browne, chief spokesman for the city force, countering Lynch's mass exodus claim.

The NYPD cops who've left the force "didn't get better jobs, they went to boring jobs," Browne asserted.

"The NYPD has never been more competitive. Over 300 fully qualified candidates ready to go in the last recruit class had to wait for the next one because all the slots were filled," he countered.

Lynch charged that in the past five years, 4,215 members of the NYPD have quit the department for higher-paying jobs, mostly with better-paying police departments or with the FDNY.

"The cost to recruit, screen and train an NYPD cop is $100,000, so the total cost to the city has been more than $420 million. This is money that would be better spent paying a competitive salary in preventing officers from quitting," Lynch fumed.

Browne sharply disputed Lynch's figures, insisting that "many of those who leave drop out because they couldn't compete in the police academy" or "found police work too demanding."
 

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I took the test in Nov. I got my card back in Jan and did well. I have had investigators/recruiters calling my house and leaveing a message a few times in the last few weeks.


I kinda feel bad telling the guy I just took the test as free practice! :twisted:
 

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I also took that test. I'm certainly considering the move though. I didn't get any instructions beyond getting the card and list rank. Is the rest of the process self-initiated or will they contact me if I'm eligible? Still in the constant battle of deciding to finish school or going for NY PD. It's a tough choice that soon enough is going to be decided financially anyways.
 

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STAY IN SCHOOL!!!!!!!

I was offerd a cushy locomotive engineers job at 70K a year,full benifits and only 6 hours a day---but get paid for 8 and I turned it down,haveing accepted I would have had to drop my FS courses.
 

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Think about all the costs associated with the move to NYC, plus the fact that there is a city tax or two on damn near everything, everything is more expensive. The salary might seem good if you were living in a less expensive area, but housing prices are outragious in NYC... and you have to live in the city. Just my :2c:.
 

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I went through the process for NYPD a few years ago. I think I made about 8 trips into NY to get everything done. One time I was on the train heading home when someone from Applicant processing division was calling my house to schedule another test. When I was pricing housing average rent on a 1 bed apt was about 1400 a month. Never mind that the fact most landlords want proof of employment which is tough to get giving the amount of notice NYPD gives their recruits for the upcoming academy class. if anyone wants more info feel free to PM me.
 

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Im NYPD and did the whole back and forth process 7 years ago. It really does suck. The following are just a few good and bad points as I see them.
Its a great experience. Its 20 and out retirement. The job is as real as it gets. You have the opportunity to do A LOT. Its a great stepping stone to get on somewhere else if thats your goal. NYPD academy transfers over to most New England Depts.

Its a tough city to make it in. It never stops, slows down and it shows no mercy. While the $1400.00 apt is not untrue, it is certainly not the norm but then again I dont know too many cops that live in Manhattan. And you can live on Long Island andUpstate My apts were always within reason ($750-, $850-)
The pay is not great for the amouint of work you do. The Civillian Complaint Review Board entertains EVERYTHING (Im not sure how it goes in Massachusetts.) You are a number on this job. They dont care about you. Most cops on this job are bitter but they're New Yorkers...they complain about everything.
Bottom line: The job is a pain to get on. The city is a pain to work in and live in. But if youre resourceful the job is a great stepping stone. Its great experience if you look at it that way (which I did 7 yrs ago...still waiting for MSP to call.) Make the job work for you and it will....Any questions...feel free to P.M. me.
 

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SOM98, sorry I didn't reply on this sooner. Both guys that I know that left for NYPD are from Mass. However one quit NYPD a few months back and is with another department now. He was at NYPD for less than 2 years, although he was looking for another job shortly after he finished the academy.
 
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