Massachusetts Cop Forum banner
1 - 20 of 142 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone here know what the payscales are for the NHSP? Also OT availability, length of shift, times of shifts (ex. 7-3, 3-11, 11-7), and rotation (I heard 6 on 3 off)? Also does anyone know anybody on the department and how do they like it? Thanks in advance.:yes:
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
8,417 Posts
Cliff - if you dont get an answer to this post, send a PM to PHUZZ01
He's a NH State Cop and a pretty good guy when it comes to providing info. on NHSP topics..
Good Luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Cliff said:
Does anyone here know what the payscales are for the NHSP? Also OT availability, length of shift, times of shifts (ex. 7-3, 3-11, 11-7), and rotation (I heard 6 on 3 off)? Also does anyone know anybody on the department and how do they like it? Thanks in advance.:yes:
When you find out could you let me know. I'm potentially looking to move back up to the area and would like to hear more about the NH State Police. Thanks.
 

·
Subscribing Member
Joined
·
1,170 Posts
leoinfl.....what, leave Florida? The sunshine, palm trees and warm sunny air? Say it isn't so! :shock:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
2005 Test Dates:
November 26, 2005

2006 Test Dates:
January 28, 2006

March 25, 2006

May 27, 2006

July 29, 2006

September 30, 2006

November 25, 2006



MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS

Education / Experience:

a) High school diploma or GED, PLUS two years full-time employment as a certified police officer, OR
b) High school diploma or GED, PLUS 60 credit hours from a recognized college, preferably with a major in Criminal Justice, OR
c) High school diploma or GED, PLUS two years full-time active duty military service with an honorable discharge.








SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

• Age/Citizenship: Must be at least 21 years of age either prior to or on scheduled date of written examination administration, and a U.S. citizen.

• Eyesight: Must be at least 20/40 in each eye uncorrected and corrected to 20/20 in each eye and have normal uncorrected color perception.

• Hearing: Must possess hearing sufficient to enable performance of essential job functions.

SALARY / BENEFITS

The starting salary for the State Police Trooper I position is $37,313.

Newly hired Troopers accumulate annual leave at the rate of one (1) day per month, and this leave can be used upon accrual. Sick leave is accumulated at the rate of one and one-quarter (1 1/4) days per month and can also be used upon accrual. Troopers continue to accrue annual and sick leave in accordance with the Collective Bargaining Agreement. Probationary troopers are also entitled to 12 annual holidays.

Troopers and their families receive excellent dental and health benefits with employee premiums fully paid by the State of New Hampshire.

All full-time troopers are enrolled into the NH Retirement System as a condition


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Yeah, it's great down here for about three months of the year and then hot as hell the rest...nothing below 90 and 100% humidity for 6-8 months! However, I won't complain because it's great out now!!! I'm a New Englander and that is where I want to be!

Stay Safe

Mitpo62 said:
leoinfl.....what, leave Florida? The sunshine, palm trees and warm sunny air? Say it isn't so! :shock:
 

·
Subscribing Member
Joined
·
583 Posts
I didn't see this back when it was originally posted. Payscales are listed on the website, and we just got a new contract. In fact, starting in July 2006, brand new probationary troopers will make over $40,000/yr. BASE salary, not including court, OT, or details. And $40,000 up here is like $80,000 down in Mass. (unless of course you live in the Salem area or on the seacoast, which I don't count as NH at all! more like a colony of MA!).

Shifts are either 8.5 or 9 hours (usually 8.5, but each shift rotates through a period of 9 hr. shifts). You work six days on, three days off. The times vary by Troop, but my troop's dayshift is 0700-1530, and the evening shift is 1530-midnight. My troop doesn't have a midnight shift, so we get called out occasionally. Any troops with interstate patrols have full midnight shifts.

Plenty of OT. If you don't mind standing in a construction zone all day, you can pretty much get one when you want (although less during the winter months). Evening and midnight shifts make a lot of court OT, because some troops (like mine) prosecute their own cases, and off-duty court gets you a 4 hour minimum. Callouts are also a 4 hour minimum.
 

·
Subscribing Member
Joined
·
4,345 Posts
Plus there are other benefits in NH
No state income tax.
No sales tax.
NHSP has I believe a full non-contributory medical insurance plan
Retirement includes OT & Details for final formula determination
You can get up to 100% retirement, Cost of living cheaper
I also heard that NHSP you don't put any money into the state retirement, no contributions on part of the officer. Is that true?
 

·
Subscribing Member
Joined
·
583 Posts
j809 said:
Plus there are other benefits in NH
No state income tax.
No sales tax.
NHSP has I believe a full non-contributory medical insurance plan
Retirement includes OT & Details for final formula determination
You can get up to 100% retirement, Cost of living cheaper
I also heard that NHSP you don't put any money into the state retirement, no contributions on part of the officer. Is that true?
Negative, we contribute something like 9% for retirement. But all the other stuff you said was true. My medical and dental are fully covered with no premiums. Retirement includes all income, including details and OT. The formula for benefits is average three top years for total income * 2.5% for each year served. So 20 years = 50%, 30 years = 75% and so on.

As far as cost of living, I bought a 2300 square foot house (4 bedrooms, 2 bath, full kitchen, dining room, living room, and finished basement with large den and office) on two acres of hilltop property with a view, an 18X36 inground swimming pool, and a two car garage for $250k. Try that inside I-495.
 

·
Subscribing Member
Joined
·
583 Posts
First, there are three rural troops (C, E, and F) and second, I'd rather not get too specific. Some guys on this board were given a major headache when some butthole found out where exactly they worked.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
not a problem, dont want to cause any problems. I have been told during the FTO period for SP you are required to reside at the barracks. is that still true. I know one of the troops does not require this at this point. I am interested in NHSP when my contract in southern NH expires and want to know all of the requirements before hand. I have also been told that if you own property in a troop jurisdiction, they make a reasonable attempt to keep you within the troop, as long as it works out. Any other info would be gratley appriciated.
 

·
Subscribing Member
Joined
·
498 Posts
As far as cost of living, I bought a 2300 square foot house (4 bedrooms, 2 bath, full kitchen, dining room, living room, and finished basement with large den and office) on two acres of hilltop property with a view, an 18X36 inground swimming pool, and a two car garage for $250k. Try that inside I-495.[/QUOTE]

I know to some, Mass. ends at 495 (some even 128) but you can still find this type of deal in the 413 area code...:yes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
884 Posts
My buddy is taking the test and he has the full-time municipal academy. Does anyone know what the training consists of for full-time Mass municipal academy grads. He was told just a 30 day academy. Is this true?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Not 100% on the law package portion having a duration, out of state certified sit in on the academy classes whenever they are scheduled. When I went through the academy, I recall a Trooper from VT who was hired same day as I was sitting in on a law class and he was in his FTO period.

And as far as trying to get anyone to NH, I'll admit that I am trying to recruit good people to test for NHSP. I have fourteen years left (only have to do 20 or reach 45 yrs old to retire), so we need any squared away potentiaIs we can steal from MA or anywhere else for that matter. We have openings that the Colonel wants to fill, because the Governor is very supportive of the NHSP and pushed to get 7 more Troopers in the budget. Problem is, penny pinching politicians see the positions still vacant and argue that we don't need them. The fact of the matter is we are not getting a good turnout at testing and Colonel Booth will not hire a mediocre applicant just to fill the position. later...
 

·
Subscribing Member
Joined
·
583 Posts
jsc4324 said:
not a problem, dont want to cause any problems. I have been told during the FTO period for SP you are required to reside at the barracks. is that still true. I know one of the troops does not require this at this point. I am interested in NHSP when my contract in southern NH expires and want to know all of the requirements before hand. I have also been told that if you own property in a troop jurisdiction, they make a reasonable attempt to keep you within the troop, as long as it works out. Any other info would be gratley appriciated.
The requirement for living at the barracks depends on what barracks you are assigned to, if/where you have a house already, status of dependents, etc. Basically, it is up to the Lt. of the barracks to decide. Coming from Mass., I was all to happy to live at the barracks. For one thing, I didn't have already have a place in NH. For another, while I was learning the ropes, there were always people around the troop station to help when I was doing reports, etc. And finally, the State Police compensate you for all meals while you are required to live at the barracks. This amounted to an extra $500 check per month. Oh yeah, and I wasn't paying rent or anything. Not a bad way to put a few extra bucks in the bank.

As for as being placed where you already own a house, they will make an attempt to accomodate you when they are giving you your permanent placement. However, that does not mean that you won't be sent to another troop for a few months while you are training. And of course, there are no guarantees. If they really need a warm body somewhere else, they will do what they have to do.

Finally, for those who asked about the law package, it is the same length as the basic recruit academy (14 weeks now). The difference is that you aren't there most of the time, and you don't have to live there. You just go and sit in on certain blocks of instruction. This usually amounts to about 3-5 four hour blocks per week. You can wear civilian clothes (not recruit uniform), and you do not have to suffer through any of the stuff that the recruits do. You are purely there for the academics.
 

·
Needs more complaints
Joined
·
4,309 Posts
To the mods: See how you should consolidate the websites under one NE Police Network? This is a perfect example why.

As far as living in NH I understand they jam you with real estate taxes, is this true?
 
1 - 20 of 142 Posts
Top