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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
By Curt Brown
Standard-Times staff writer
August 22, 2008 6:00 AM
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State officials have decided to close the New Bedford, Plymouth and Boylston regional police academies to cut expenses in the face of a budget shortfall of more than $600,000.
The action - taken Wednesday by the Municipal Police Chiefs' Training Council - presents a hardship to police departments across SouthCoast and Cape Cod, which rely heavily on the New Bedford and Plymouth academies for training police recruits and updating the skills of veteran officers.
The Plymouth Regional Police Academy serves as the police recruit training facility for 130 towns, including all of Cape Cod and Southeastern Massachusetts, with a population base of 4,000 police officers, according to a spokesman for the academy.
The New Bedford Regional Police Academy, located at 1204 Purchase St., is used by departments across SouthCoast for in-service training.
All police officers are required to complete 40 hours of in-service training annually.
At least two recruit classes per year are held at the Plymouth academy, and 100 to 110 recruits graduate each year. The recruits are trained in all aspects of law enforcement, including criminal law, community policing, firearms training, physical agility and emergency driving.
The New Bedford academy, which opened in 2003, provides in-service and specialized training to officers across Southeastern Massachusetts. About 1,400 officers receive training annually at the classes, which are run from November to June.
Terrell Harris, a spokesman for the Executive Office of Public Safety and Security, said Thursday the Municipal Police Chiefs' Training Council decided to close the three academies in response to the budget shortfall.
He said it is trying to keep the New Bedford, Plymouth and Boylston academies open for the next 90 days.
He said the Municipal Police Chiefs' Training Council is facing a shortfall of more than $600,000 for fiscal 2009 and will have to make more cuts at the council's Sept. 4 meeting.
Mr. Harris said the recruit training class, scheduled for the Plymouth Regional Police Academy, will be moved to the Randolph Regional Police Academy, which is the next closest facility.
He said the Municipal Police Chiefs' Training Council will provide additional space at the Randolph academy for departments that had been planning to send their recruits to Plymouth for training scheduled to start next month.
"We don't have a choice. We will have to make the space," he said.
The closing of New Bedford and Plymouth leaves the training council with only three police academies: Springfield, Reading and Randolph.
There were also indications Thursday night that the funding problems for police training are a long way from being resolved and the upcoming police recruit class in Randolph could be canceled.
The funding issue is such a concern that Mattapoisett Police Chief Mary Lyons, who is also an officer with the Massachusetts Chiefs of Police Association, said the police chiefs voted at an emergency meeting Thursday to suspend all training statewide, except for current classes at the State Police Academy in New Braintree and the Randolph Police Academy until there is a resolution of the funding issue for training.
Their recommendation, which Chief Lyons said is traditionally adopted, now goes to the training council for its Sept. 4 meeting.
Chief Lyons, the second vice president of the chiefs' association, said police chiefs want to see the restoration of $16 million in funds for training that was cut by the Legislature.
Sen. Mark C.W. Montigny, D-New Bedford, said he is hopeful the problem caused by the closing of the three academies can be remedied with the assistance of Gov. Deval Patrick.
However, he cautioned that the state and local communities are all in a budget crunch and compromises have to be made.
He said he knows it is important for officers to be trained close to home, but it would not be the worst thing for recruits from local departments to have to travel to Randolph instead of Plymouth.
"It's not a crisis to train people in Randolph," he said.
Dartmouth, Westport, Fairhaven and Mattapoisett were all planning to send recruits to Plymouth for six months of training, which was scheduled to start Sept. 8.
Dartmouth was planning to send four recruits to that class, while Westport, Fairhaven and Mattapoisett were each planning to send one.
Each department will have to decide what to do now that the training facility has been moved to Randolph.
Fairhaven Police Chief Gary F. Souza said sending recruits to Randolph would cost his department more money in overtime and gasoline. But he said he has no choice but to send his recruit to Randolph.
"Assuming they have a spot available in Randolph, then we'll have to bear the expense because there are vacancies we have to fill," he said.
Chief Lyons said she will send her recruit to Randolph, if there is a guarantee that his training will not be compromised by a lack of funds.
Dartmouth Police Chief Mark Pacheco is hoping the Plymouth Regional Police Academy will be opened.
Bit if it closed, he said, he would have to figure out what he can do within the limits of budget.
Local departments said they will have to go to the drawing board to figure out a way to provide in-service training for their officers.
"We don't have the funding to run an in-service training facility," said New Bedford Deputy Police Chief David Provencher.
Deputy Chief Kevin M. Hegarty said they might begin an in-service training program jointly with the Fall River Police Department similar to the one as they had five or six years ago.
Chief Souza said perhaps the towns can jointly run their own in-service training programs.
Contact Curt Brown at [email protected]
 

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3 police academies to close

3 regional police academies to close

State board OK's reduced training

By Michael Norton State House News Service / August 22, 2008

A state board has voted to close regional police training academies in Boylston, New Bedford, and Plymouth and reduce the amount of training municipal officers and recruits receive, prompting the head of a police chiefs' group to declare a "crisis."

The training reductions and academy closings, expected over the next 90 days under a plan approved this week by the Municipal Police Training Committee, address about half of a $600,000 budget problem, according to Wayne Sampson, executive director of the Massachusetts Chiefs of Police Association.
"Without any question, there is a crisis in police training throughout the entire Commonwealth of Massachusetts," Sampson said. "And the budget cuts recommended so far are only the beginning."
The news comes as Governor Deval Patrick, nearly halfway through his term, appears unlikely to hit his goal of 1,000 new police officers on the street by the end of 2010, barring a sudden infusion of new officers.
State officials say they plan to keep pursing their mission of delivering meaningful police training for municipal officers, but caution that police and recruits may wait longer for training or need to travel longer distances to get it.
The New Bedford facility provides "in service" training to existing officers; the Boylston and Plymouth facilities targeted for closing are designated primarily for police recruits.
Recruit training facilities in Randolph, Reading, and Springfield are not affected under current budget management plans, according to Terrel Harris, spokesman for the Executive Office of Public Safety, but, Harris cautioned, "It's safe to say there are more cuts to come."
The committee next meets on Sept. 4.
Meeting in Wellesley yesterday, the executive board of the police chiefs' association voted to recommend suspending all municipal police training until there is an "adequate" police training funding strategy in place.
Sampson said the police chiefs planned to discuss the issue today with Lieutenant Governor Timothy P. Murray.

© Copyright 2008 Globe Newspaper Company.
 

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Great, when Massachusetts already lacks behind several other states in the country as far as police training availability and funding dollars is concerned they decide to cut it even further. What a shame!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I swear Patrick took a chapter off of The Wire's 5th season. Mayor gets Police support, Police believe they will be getting a pay raise and other work related benefits. Mayor takes back the pay raise, halts payment on OT, and promises to help out later.

Patrick, promises to help the Commonwealth by adding 1,000 police to the streets. Looks as though that promise has fell through, does not appropriate enough funding so three police academies close. Where PD's have to wait longer for a recruit class to open up and will run short during that process.

To top it off all wants to replace police with flagmen and wait a year to see if there will be actual savings.

Sounds as though he is on the fast track to D.C, riding Obama's coattails. Don't let the door hit you on the way out!!

Maybe we should start referring Patrick to Clay Davis...shhiiiiiiitttttt.
 

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I swear it seems like Patrick doesn't have a idea, plan or clue what he's f*cking doing. Is he really just this stupid or does he fly from one bad idea to another without thinking of the long term consequences?

Idea #1:
Redecorate office, buy new car. Check
Idea #2:
Hire expensive employee for wife. Check
Idea #3:
Cancel cost-of-living raises for retirees. Check
Idea #4:
Put casino revenues in the budget, without actually having the casinos approved or built. Check
Idea #5:
Replace police officers on work sites with flagmen to see if there are any implications. Check
Idea #6:
Close down half the police academies in the state. Check
 

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Oh come on now kids!

Why so glum? It's O.K. rank n' file, Don't worry MassChiefs...
Maybe we should consider running MPOC's out of New Braintree?
Oh yeah! that's already being done now.
;)
Hmmm... MSP took over Campus Academy after 1993 from the MCJTC.
Hmmm... MSP is proving they can oversee an MPOC right now at SPA.
:confused:
Maybe Degutis can take over as Chief at Massasoit soon?
 

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Oh come on now kids!

Why so glum? It's O.K. rank n' file, Don't worry MassChiefs...
Maybe we should consider running MPOC's out of New Braintree?
Oh yeah! that's already being done now.
;)
Hmmm... MSP took over Campus Academy after 1993 from the MCJTC.
Hmmm... MSP is proving they can oversee an MPOC right now at SPA.
:confused:
Maybe Degutis can take over as Chief at Massasoit soon?
Why are you picking on the MSP? They are only filling in where they are needed. Thank god that they are willing to step into the void to take over the training and double checking when the locals do pistol permits.

You almost make it sound as if the MSP wants to run LE in MA.
 

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This is incredible, I feel for you guys, I just knew the times were a-changin' when Deval went into office....that's why I got the hell out of MA!!!!

Can't say I miss the politics one bit...
 

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City protests closing of police academy

By BILL ABRAMSON
Standard-Times correspondent
August 23, 2008 6:00 AM

New Bedford City Councilor Brian Gomes wants the council to go on record requesting that the New Bedford Police Academy remain open and he will invite the surrounding towns to join the battle.
The Municipal Police Chiefs' Training Council acted Wednesday to deal with a $600,000 budget shortfall by closing the regional police academies in New Bedford, Plymouth and Boylston.
"The academy served this part of the state and we need something like that here," Mr. Gomes said. "We shouldn't be traveling because the cities and towns have to pay for it and we're all running a little short of money.
There was an economic stimulus to having the academy here. They have lunch here and spend money here or stop on the way out of town to get gas here.
"If the state has to cut back on something, there are other things they can go after to save money," Mr. Gomes said. "They should never backtrack when it comes to public safety."
City Council President Jane Gonsalves said the council was not aware of the closing at its meeting Thursday night. She said she found out when she read about it in the newspaper Friday morning.
"We're going to want to have it reopened," Ms. Gonsalves said. "Obviously, it's a budget issue, but I hope there is money to be found somewhere. I assume the mayor will go to the governor on this issue."
In a statement issued earlier Friday, Mayor Scott W. Lang said he planned to ask the New Bedford Police Department to reach out to other departments in the area to gauge interest in developing a regional training program.
"By joining our resources, I believe we can assemble an in-service program that would serve the entire region. New Bedford is not willing to compromise on police training," Mayor Lang wrote.
The academy based in Plymouth was used to train new recruits and housed a 22-week program that must be passed before an officer can be put on the street. The New Bedford location at 1204 Purchase St. was used for state-mandated training. Each officer is required to have 40 hours of training each year. The nearest academy will be located at Tower Hill School in Randolph.
According to Mapquest, the distance and time involved to either location fom New Bedford is fairly close. It is about 45 miles and 51 minutes from New Bedford to Plymouth and 42 miles and 47 minutes to Randolph. Lt. Jeffrey P. Silva of the New Bedford Police Department was disappointed by the loss of the academy, but he insisted there would be no visible impact on the department.
"It'll have no impact on the citizens of the city and no impact on the level of training that our officers have," Lt. Silva explained. "The officers will be trained as they always have. The mandated training will be done and, in our collective bargaining agreement, officers can get up to 10 days of certified training. Hopefully, that translates into professional, confident police officers.
"You hate to lose a regional facility," he said. "Whenever you have services made available to you in your backyard, it's a plus."

http://www.southcoasttoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080823/NEWS/808230356
 

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Well I was heading into that next Plymouth Police Academy. Guess now I have a longer drive up to Randolph. This is un frigging real. I do hope they come up with a plan to fix this problem. Now I guess I wait and see what happens.:NO:
 
G

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Thanks once again to the IBPO and Mass Coalition of Police, among others, for endorsing this train wreck of a governor.

Great decision guys! :rolleyes:
 

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Why are you picking on the MSP?
You almost make it sound as if the MSP wants to run LE in MA.
Ahhh...
NOT picking on the MSP. I am pointing out the FACTS so far.
MSP is expanding their training role and offering more to ANYBODY, while the MPTC has been getting much more restrictive in whats offered to non-municipal agencies.
MSP has offered quite a few certification and professional development courses for to ANY agency with a CJIS/LEAPS code for some time, including of course, Municipal agencies. In contrast, for some time before this sudden budget crisis, MPTC denied many agencies that it had served for years. Those are the facts.
:cool:
Now opinions and political factors can be discussed. I don't know if the Legislature and Chiefs need to re-evaluate Campus/EPO/Etc having access and contributing to funding, as a way to help out. I wonder to what degree any anti-sheriff motivations may have had in the MPOC/In-service restrictions in later years. I doubt that impacted funding in any way...
Well lets see what people think?
:confused:
 

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Three police training academies set to close

I don't think this has been posted yet so here ya go...

Three police training academies set to close

By Norman Miller/Daily News staff
MetroWest Daily News
Posted Aug 23, 2008 @ 12:21 AM
BOSTON -
The head of the state's police chiefs group described as a "crisis" a decision to close several regional training academies and reduce the amount of training officers and recruits receive.
Under a plan approved this week aimed at saving $300,000, the Municipal Police Training Committee will close academies in Boylston, New Bedford and Plymouth and reduce the amount of training, said Wayne Sampson, executive director of the Massachusetts Chiefs of Police Association.
"Without any question there is a crisis in police training throughout the entire Commonwealth of Massachusetts, " said Sampson. "And the budget cuts recommended so far are only the beginning."
Local police chiefs said the closings will hurt.
"We use Boylston extensively, " said Westborough Police Chief Alan Gordon. "All of our in-service training is done there, and we've sent recruits there. It's a huge loss for us. I'm not looking forward to it because it's g oing to cost us a lot more money."
Natick Police Chief Dennis Mannix said his town and other MetroWest communities will now have to spend a lot more money just on gas sending the officers to other academies.
He also said there will now be a longer wait for both new recruits and officers to receive necessary training.
"You're not going to be able to train the people," said Mannix. "I'm hoping to enroll several candidates in the October academy, but that may change now. Firearms training, domestic assault training, sexual assault training will probably be gone. These are specialized training areas, but the ones we need the most."
The news comes as Gov. Deval Patrick, nearly halfway through his term, appears unlikely to hit his goal of 1,000 new police officers on the street by the end of 2010, barring a sudden infusion of new officers.
State officials say they plan to keep pursuing their mission of delivering meaningful police training for municipal officers, but caution that police and recruits may wait longer for training or need to travel longer distances to get it.
The New Bedford facility provides in-service training to existing officers; the Boylston and Plymouth facilities targeted for closing are designated primarily for recruits.
Milford Police Chief Thomas O'Loughlin said the state is not doing enough to ensure officers are properly prepared.
"Not funding training is ... frankly it's irresp onsible," he said. "There's just so much specialized training we're going to be losing. It's not rocket science. If you have a new procedure that comes out for heart surgeries, all of the surgeons will learn it. In-service training should be statewide."
Recruit training facilities in Randolph, Reading and Springfield are not affected under current budget management plans, said Terrel Harris, spokesman for the Executive Office of Public Safety.
But Harris said, "It's safe to say there are more cuts to come."
The committee meets again on Sept. 4.
Asked about specialized police training, such as training for domestic violence and sexual assault cases, Harris said, "It's the same story as the in-service, there will be less of it."
Meeting in Wellesley on Thursday, the executive board of the police chiefs association voted to recommend suspending all municipal police training until there's an "adequate" police training funding strategy in place. Sampson said the police chiefs plan to discuss the issue with Lt. Gov. Tim Murray.
Asked about the impact of the closings and training reductions, Harris said "it depends where you are," noting about 450 officers were trained in each of the last two years, half by the committee and half in municipal facilities, such as one run by the City of Boston.
Sampson said $15 million is available each year to train 9,000 firefighters but the police training line item totals $2.8 million to serve 18,000 police officers.
"There's something wrong here," he said. "We just can't continue at this level.
"The police officers are going to get hurt," continued Sampson. "There's going to be lawsuits. The training is completely inadequate statewide. The most important issue for us is to have uniform training for every single police officer."
Harris said the cuts would not be occurring if the Legislature had adopted Patrick's budget. "The governor funded us and the Legislature cut us," he said.
The Legislature and Patrick agreed in July to create a special commission to study establishing a statewide law enforcement training program "to coordinate municipal law enforcement training and creating more efficient law enforcement facilities, staffing instruction and preparedness. "
(Norman Miller can be reached at 508-626-3823 or at [email protected] com.)
 

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Re: Three police training academies set to close

I know it doesn't help the driving much but the State Police Academy offers lot of these classes...but the Commonwealth needs to spend more on training....it always comes down to cops fighting over the pathetic money offered to train us...they make us turn on each other over cash...
 

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Tell me if this makes any sense. The fire ding dings have one state run academy and is responsible for training 9,000 ding dings and has a budget of 18 MILLION. The MPTC is responsible for training 18,000 cops and only has a budget of 2.8 MILLION.
NECN Video on this story
http://www.necn.com/Boston/New-Engl...three-Mass-police-academies-/1219442006.html#
LOL...Sept. 11 and the WFD tragedies got the FD's A LOT of sympathy. WE will never get it because it is our job to tell people, "No!" That's why we can't have 20 stations in a city/town, or $900,000 cruisers. Dunno about you guys, but this is sad! Just sad! I hope all of the PD's realized that they are liable for ensuring their officer's are certified in numerous areas. Without these academies, along with new cuts next week for those that are left, their liability only increases. As is the case in most things related to LE, it will take a large law suit, or two, before they realize they goofed. :confused::rolleyes::confused:
 

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Tell me if this makes any sense. The fire ding dings have one state run academy and is responsible for training 9,000 ding dings and has a budget of 18 MILLION. The MPTC is responsible for training 18,000 cops and only has a budget of 2.8 MILLION.
NECN Video on this story
http://www.necn.com/Boston/New-Engl...three-Mass-police-academies-/1219442006.html#
All of the funding for the Basic Recruit Training comes from contributions of homeowner insurance policies. Bsically the underwriters for fire insurance in MA voluntarily contribute to the fire academy
 

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All of the funding for the Basic Recruit Training comes from contributions of homeowner insurance policies. Bsically the underwriters for fire insurance in MA voluntarily contribute to the fire academy
Good info! Maybe the unions should contact ADT and Brinks?!?!?!?!?:confused:
 
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