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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

I didn't see a thread in regards to my question so I figured this was appropriate...

For my new job I am training with a Ruger SP 101 .38 Special revolver and have learned some of the basics about the firearm today yet did poorly when it came to actually firing (was a poor 1 for 6 at about 15 feet out).

Just curious for those of you who are experienced with revolvers if you had some general aiming tips so I can pass the firearms training.

Thanks :)
 

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I had a major problem with flinching. Place a dime on the front site of the weapon and dry fire over and over until you can keep that dime in place. Once you get the feel of the trigger pull remember it on the range. Also breathe outward through your mouth slowly as you squeeze.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for all of the advice guys, I will keep it in mind (less the 'whites of their eyes' crack, haha).

I have never used a revolver before yesterday so I think I have learned fairly quickly a lot of general knowledge. Unfortunately, I need to score 210 points out of of a possible 300 to pass the semi-combat gun course I am taking for my new job. Today I scored a 163 in the practice run. So naturally I am kind of concerned. A lot of the other recruits are well on their way to passing. I just have to keep at it and get real good quick.

Wolfman, most of my shots are for the most part within the same vicinity. I am drawing from a Safariland S2 Holster (much easier than the button strap from what I hear). We're shooting from 3-7-15-and 25 feet respectively.
 

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You don't really give a lot of information, so it is difficult to diagnose your problem. I'll throw out a few general tips.

Stance : The foundation of accurate shooting is stance. Make sure that you aren't standing is a way that is unnatural or taxing for your body. I prefer an "isosceles" style stance. Feet a little more than shoulder width apart, faced square towards your target. Knees bent, as if you are about to sit in a chair. Feet, knee, hips, shoulders, body armor faced towards your target, hands held above your waistline.

Draw : Break the snap (or whatever other retention device) and establish the grip simultaneously. Grip should be established with your pistol still in the holster. Pistol comes up and out, your non-dominant hand meets the pistol in the centerline of your body and they punch out together. Arms should be fully locked out together. Make sure you have a good grip with your non-dominant hand. Your index finger of your non-dominant hand should be a tight up underneath the triggerguard as possible. The goal is to have a fairly even weight distribution between your dominant (60% of weapon weight)and non-dominant hands (40% of weapon weight). Avoid placing your index finger of your non-dominant hand on the front of the triggerguard.

Sight Alignment and Sight Picture : I'm assuming you are using a sighted fire method (many progressive departments have shifted towards the faster, more instinctive "point shooting" or "combat focused" methodology, but we'll keep it simple). The rule is "equal height, equal light". This means the front sight post is the same height as the rear sight notch, and is centered, allowing the same amount of light on each side. Place your sight picture on the center-of-mass of your target. When you shoot your target should be blurry, rear sights blurry and front sight crystal clear. Focus should be the front sight only.

Trigger squeeze and manipulation: The only part of your trigger finger that should be touching the trigger is the pad of your index finger from slightly before the tip, to the first knuckle. You will have to figure out where exactly between these two point is most comfortable for you. Trigger pull should be smooth and consistent, not jerky. When you've aligned your sights and decided to make the shot, you begin your trigger pull. Don't pull the trigger and stop, pull the trigger a little more and stop. This is called "staging" the trigger and leads to poor shooting. Smooth trigger pull all the way through. Don't lose focus on the front sight and attempt to look at your hits. A good excercise to keep you from anticipating the recoil of the revolver is to repeat in your head "front sight, front sight, front sight" as you pull the trigger until the shot breaks. You might even want say it out loud at first. This mantra distracts your mind from anticipating the recoil.
 

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Thanks for all of the advice guys, I will keep it in mind (less the 'whites of their eyes' crack, haha).

I have never used a revolver before yesterday so I think I have learned fairly quickly a lot of general knowledge. Unfortunately, I need to score 210 points out of of a possible 300 to pass the semi-combat gun course I am taking for my new job. Today I scored a 163 in the practice run. So naturally I am kind of concerned. A lot of the other recruits are well on their way to passing. I just have to keep at it and get real good quick.

Wolfman, most of my shots are for the most part within the same vicinity. I am drawing from a Safariland S2 Holster (much easier than the button strap from what I hear). We're shooting from 3-7-15-and 25 feet respectively.
If your really concerned, I don't know if you have a coach or anything but I had some coaching from Lt. Ed O'leary from Randloph P.D. (www.ontargettraining.us) and it definitely made a big difference in my shot... and no i'm not getting anything in return for dropping his name here, he just really knows how to turn a poor shooter into a much sharper one in little time.

Just a thought if your on a timeline, otherwise "practice makes perfect" is definitely a true statement when it comes to shooting.
 

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First and foremost find out what hand you shoot with. It took me several shoots to find out what hand I shoot with because I could actually shot very well with both. Determine if you are left eyed or right eyed. Sit in the middle of a large room and place your finger up in front of your face. Line your finger up with the corner of the room where the two walls meet, doing this with both eyes open. Dont move your finger, close the left keeping the right open then close the right keeping the left open. If your finger moves thats your week eye, the eye your finger stays in place is your strong one. The strong one stays open and the weak one is shut when shooting. Now if you are like me cross dominant you shoot with you right hand but your left eye is the strongest or visa versa left handed right eyed. If so you have to compensate you shooting. At this point in my life I can shoot/target practice with both eyes opened but that comes with a lot of practice. In the beginning I found I shot to the left, if your left handed and right eyed you will be incline to shot to the right. Usually cross dominant people dont have a problem shotting close range its when you go 30 feet plus it comes into effect. So you must compensate and the only way to learn is to be aware of it and practice, practice, practice! Search online for other NRA sites to correct or live with cross dominants if thats indeed your problem.....


Good Luck
 

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Some youtube videos that I found that helped me

Finding natural point of aim

How to grip a pistol

Revolver Grip
 
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Make sure to relax when you hold the controller, and lead your target slightly to account for internet lag.

Oh... this isn't the aiming tip thread for Call of Duty 4?
 

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You got to give us more info on where your rounds impact.
Stance and all that jazz doesnt mean as much as getting your front sight on the target... concentrate on it. The next is trigger squeeze. Dont jerk it, flinch or any of that. Just smoothly pull it back, and let the gun go bang...thats the whole concept of shooting. Everything else is minor tweeks.
Oh yea, and dont drop the damn gun on the ground... the instructors and fellow line mates tend to frown on that.
 
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