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Hey I have a question for anyone that has been in the Army. What is the story with the Criminal Investigative Division and the Special Agent position. Has anyone here ever been a CID Agent or knows of someone who has. I want to look into it but would like some info first. If anyone can tell me anything useful I would appreciate it.
 

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If you want to be in CID you must first enlist as a MP after you do your time as a MP and obtain the rank of SGT you can apply to transfer to a CID unit. If you get selected they will train you and your may have to extend you enlistment contract. The best route for CID agent or 95D this may be the old MOS code is to go warrant officer. CID are also deployed to combat zones to investigate possible war crime infractions. The civillian CID only handle minor infractions such a fraud may by civillian Army Workers. If you don't want to enlist in the military try the Navy NCIS
 

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You're right - Army CID is either civilian or enlisted/warrant. The civilians just work on procurement fraud - the enlisted/warrants investigate major crime within the army - including law of war violations. Many of them are serving in Iraq and Afghanistan presently. You have to do your time as a MP before applying to enter the CID. It's a good gig if you can get it.

Navy NCIS is all civilian - led by a Director that reports to the SECNAV. It's a great job - they investigate major crime in the Navy and Marine Corps.

Air Force Office of Special Investigations is a mix of civilian and enlisted/officer - though primarily civilian. Also an interesting job.

I have a co-worker that retired after 24 years in the Army - the bulk of it in CID - he loved it.

I've also had a few cases with NCIS out of Newport and in DC when I worked down there. Good folks - highly professional - with great resources.
 

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Another option to civilians is DCIS, it used to be pretty booring but I think it's gotten a bit more exciting in the recent years.

DCIS
 

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The following are prerequisites for applying to be a US Army CID Special Agent:

a. Enlisted special agent candidates qualifications are as follows:

(1) U.S. citizenship (native born or naturalized).

(2) No record of mental or emotional disorders, including pathological personality disorders as diagnosed by a physician.

(3) Suitable character, integrity, reputation, sobriety, discretion, and stability as established by a completed SBI and by any other information developed during application processing.

(4) No record of unsatisfactory credit.

(5) No convictions by a civil court for other than minor traffic violations. More than three moving traffic violations within a 3-year period or a series of parking violations that tend to show a disregard for established laws will not be considered minor (explanation of circumstances is encouraged).

(6) No convictions by a general, special, or summary court-martial.

(7) Minimum age of 21 years.

(8) Physical profile of 222, 221, or better. Applicant must attain a minimum passing score on each component of the Army physical readiness test (APRT). Individual must meet the height and weight standards prescribed in AR 600-9, appendix A.

(9) Normal color vision. If color blind, applicant must furnish a medical certificate from a U.S. medical authority certifying that he or she can distinguish between green, red, and amber colors. Applicants for forensic disciplines must meet the criteria of chapter 3.

(10) Minimum of 2 years military service, including 12 months of continuous service immediately preceding the date of the application, and not more than 15 years of military service at the time of final action by the CG, USACIDC. Applicants for forensic disciplines must comply with the provisions of chapter 3.

(11) Standard score of 110 or higher in the aptitude area (general technical (GT) or skill technical (ST)).

(12) No record of having received a less than honorable discharge from any military service.

(13) No record of lost time under Section 972 of Title 10, United States Code (app 3b), Uniform Code of Military Justice.

(14) At least one of the following qualifications: a minimum of 6 months' military police experience; a minimum of 1 year's experience as a civilian police officer; or extensive experience in accounting, logistics, or computers, or MOS that can be incorporated into the criminal investigation realm. A degree in law enforcement or a law enforcement related field may supplement a portion of the experience requirement. (These prerequisites do not apply to laboratory examiner trainees.)

(15) Two years of college at an accredited institution (a minimum of 60 semester hours) or equivalent of 2 years of college as certified by DA under the provisions of AR 621-5. Temporary waiver of half this requirement may be considered when the applicant is otherwise fully qualified.

(a) Requests for waivers will be considered using the whole person concept.

(b) The USACIDC Accreditation Division will conduct an annual reconciliation of the individual's academic achievement, through his or her unit commander, until he or she meets the wavered civilian education requirement. If the individual has not met the requirement during the year prior to E-8 promotion zone consideration, the Accreditation Division will also provide guidance to the unit commander concerning Enlisted Evaluation Report (EER) commentary on the individual's efforts (or lack thereof) to achieve the USACIDC civilian education requirement.

(16) Maximum grade of E-6. (Currently there is a moratorium restricting acceptance of promotable E-5 and E-6).

NOTE: USACIDC places a moratorium on the maximum grade from time to time, limiting the grade requirement to SPC - SGT (non-promotable). Contact the ASAC Course Manager, or USACIDC for current policy.

(17) At least 36 months of remaining service obligation on completion of the Criminal Investigation Course. Soldiers who do not meet the service remaining obligation requirement can qualify by extending their enlistment or by reenlisting.

(18) Completion of the Test of Adult Basic Education (TABE). All CID applicants except Reserve Component and National Guard must take the TABE, Level D, at their supporting education center. The test results will be an enclosure to the application. If the TABE is unavailable, one of the tests below may be taken as an equivalent.

(a) Comprehensive Test of Basic Skills, Level 4.

(b) Differential Aptitude Test.

(c) School and College Ability Test.

(d) Scholastic Aptitude Test.

(19) Should not be on a current term of enlistment in which an enlistment bonus, a variable reenlistment bonus, or a selective reenlistment bonus has been received. If the applicant has received a bonus, he or she should include a written statement agreeing to the recoupment of the unearned portion of the bonus effective on the date of receipt of a primary military occupational specialty (PMOS) 95D. This statement should be attached to the application for acceptance into the CID. Before an applicant who is an enlisted bonus recipient can be accepted, approval by HQDA (DAPC-EPT-H) is required.
 

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I did some evidece recovery for some Navy NCIS and they are looking for good people. I guess they got a big budget increase since sept 11. The gentlemen out here told me that if you speak a foriegn language and have a degree they will hire you quick as hell. he was the director for the whole east coast b4 being put in charge of the middle east and africa. He said they never had anything with a NCIS logo on it until that show came out then they started getting shirts jackets coffee mug pens etc etc 8) :D There are 2 offices in New England one in Newport RI and one in Boston. Navy NCIS doesn't seem to bad. I only had limited dealings with army CIS, once they had to interview me because there was a bunch of us that got stuck on a working party and and while cleaning out brush I guess some1 found evidence for a case they were working on so they asked us all a few questions and the other dealing I had CIS was that a girl I was dating had a best friend that was dating a CIS agent we hung out a few times... I did notice that of the 5 or 6 I met they were all prior MP and warrant officers. They all seem to like thier gig. Its federal so good benefits and I believe all field agents start at GS6 but I am unsure.
 

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My Brother has been a CID Special Agent for 8 or more years now.

Their Title is "Special Agent" their pay is based on their rank (Chief Warrant Officer 2 for my brother) over years in service or GS for the civilians.

As someone stated above you have civilian SA's, they deal with the white collar crime and then the Army SA's deal with the rest. You have to be an E5 (SGT) or higher to join (for Army personnel). You do not need to be an MP first and it really does not help. A lot of SA's under my brother came from places like the mess hall or supply.

What they do? I can only tell you what my brother and his friends do.

Protective services (Secretary of Defense, Joint CHiefs of Staff, high ranking military officials both US and foriegn)

Typical FBI type investigations

Polygraph

Forensic Science (Mass grave sight in Iraq)

Any major crime involving US military, DoD or DoD contract personnel on or off a US military base.

My brother worked the Pentagon after 9/11. He has worked jointly on many cases with the FBI, SS, DEA and such.

It is a great carrier choice and he loves it.

The link and other information people listed above are a great resource.

Oh they carry the Sig 9mm compact pistol (NICE WEAPON)

The Navy and Marines have the Navel Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS)and the Air Force has the Officer of Investigative Service (OSI) (I think that is what OSI stands for) they hire mostly civilian or GS personnel.

I have the great pleasure of working closely with CID agents and OSI agents here in Kuwait/. Some are friends of my brothers. He even opened up the CID office here about 8 years ago. They are a great group of people.
 
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