Military Pictures Thread | MassCops

Military Pictures Thread

Discussion in 'Military News' started by CJIS, May 28, 2009.

  1. CJIS

    CJIS MassCops Member

    Anything Military Goes.

    [​IMG]F-111 Doing a fuel dump
     
  2. Pats2009

    Pats2009 New Member

  3. 7costanza

    7costanza Supporting Member

  4. CJIS

    CJIS MassCops Member

    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]
    USS Normandy
     
  5. Pats2009

    Pats2009 New Member

  6. kwflatbed

    kwflatbed MassCops Angel Staff Member

    WWII plane wreck lies in place

    [​IMG]

    Wreckage from a C-54A transport plane has rested for 65 years on rugged Fort Mountain in Maine. (Mark Arsenault for The Boston Globe)


    By Mark Arsenault and Tony DePaul

    Globe Correspondents / June 1, 2009

    Around midnight on June 20, 1944, a military transport en route from England to Washington, D.C., took on fuel in Newfoundland, and then roared off into the darkness and vanished before first light.



    [​IMG]DiscussCOMMENTS (5)

    Interactive graphic
    [​IMG]

    Fateful flight





    The casualties

    The men who died on Flight 277and their places of birth:

    Captain Roger R. Inman 42; Oskaloosa, Iowa.
    Copilot Disbrow N. Gill 29; Ontario, Canada.
    Navigator David E. Reynolds 28; San Pedro, Calif.
    Flight engineer Nordi Byrd 30; Arkadelphia, Ark.
    Radio operator Eugene B. Summers 21; Hugoton, Kan.
    Purser Samuel Berman 28; Washington, D.C.
    Army Air Forces Sergeant Elbert R. Barnes 23; Escatawpa, Miss.






    The Douglas C-54A Skymaster went missing with a crew of six and one star-crossed hitchhiker, an Army Air Forces sergeant trying to get home on leave.

    Were it not for some astute detective work, Flight 277 might not have been found for years. It had crashed 70 miles off course, in Maine, on one of the most inaccessible wilderness mountains in the East.

    The aircraft, 94 feet long and 117 feet wingtip to wingtip, was unsalvageable near the summit of Fort Mountain in the Katahdin Range. The Army left it there as a war relic and an informal monument. For 65 years now, the wreck of Flight 277 has been a destination reached by only the most hardy and determined visitors to Baxter State Park.

    "We certainly didn't do a lot to promote the crash site," said Irvin "Buzz" Caverly, 70, a former park director who worked 46 years in the shadow of Maine's highest peak, Mount Katahdin, until retiring in 2005. "That's scrub-brush country and a really dangerous place for anybody to bushwhack alone."

    When Flight 277 went down, the largest military invasion in human history was underway in Normandy, France. More than 4,000 Allied aircraft would be lost and more than 200,000 men killed, wounded, or declared missing before the liberation of Paris, still nine weeks away.

    Eclipsed by world-changing news out of France, the seven men aboard Flight 277 disappeared into history with barely a note in the newspapers.

    In 1944, the nation was at war, not just its armed forces. The crew members of Flight 277 were civilians called upon to support the war effort by flying for the Air Transport Command. Their employer was billionaire aviator Howard Hughes, principal owner of Transcontinental & Western Air Inc.

    On its final mission, the crew was hauling troop mail home from England. The pilot was 42-year-old Captain Roger "Rolley" Inman, a former barnstormer in a famous aerial show out of Kansas, the Inman Bros. Flying Circus. His wife, Margie, was a daredevil wing-walker in the act, according to her 1987 obituary in The New York Times.

    The sole active-duty serviceman on the doomed flight was a 23-year-old radioman stationed at the American air base in Stephenville, Newfoundland. When Captain Inman landed there for fuel early on June 20, Sergeant Elbert Barnes threw his duffel bag aboard and hitched a ride. He was headed home to Escatawpa, Miss.

    The air route across New Brunswick that night took pilots through heavy rains, high winds, and lightning-induced radio static, according to the report of the War Department investigation into the crash.

    Three Pages; Continued...


    On remote Maine mountainside, World War II wreckage left as informal monument - The Boston Globe


    Fateful flight

    A look at the details of Flight 277, which was lost in the Maine mountains during World War II.

    Boston.com - News
     
  7. Piper

    Piper MassCops Member

    MRE Spoon
     
  8. Delta784

    Delta784 Guest

    I took this one myself....the burning oil wells in Kuwait in February 1991. This was taken in the early morning, and you can see how dark the sky is....we'd come back from patrol looking like something from a minstrel show; our faces black from all the oil in the air.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. sgthoskins

    sgthoskins Teufelhunden

    I made this poster today. I got a chuckle out of it.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. k12kop

    k12kop MassCops Member

    6 Junior DI's? Good lord it's the platoon from hell!!
     
  11. justanotherparatrooper

    justanotherparatrooper Pissin' in liberals cheerio's for 40 years :) Staff Member

    [​IMG]

    And I thought riding the skids was tough...jeez
     
  12. k12kop

    k12kop MassCops Member

    Well it's good to see you guys are keeping busy in the woods, sgthoskins can I use that picture to scare some friends? Just the sight of it got me doing bends n' mothers!
     
  13. sgthoskins

    sgthoskins Teufelhunden

    That has dead hadji written all over it.
     
  14. kwflatbed

    kwflatbed MassCops Angel Staff Member

    [​IMG]

    Photos courtesy of Dave Ovesen
    American armor moves through a destroyed town in southern France on the way to Paris in late summer 1944.
     
  15. justanotherparatrooper

    justanotherparatrooper Pissin' in liberals cheerio's for 40 years :) Staff Member

  16. sgthoskins

    sgthoskins Teufelhunden

    Yeah, I really wish we would have joint trained with them instead of the Scotts... :mad:

    Don't get me wrong they were hard chargers, but the women were pretty umm tough if you will. ;)
     
  17. CJIS

    CJIS MassCops Member

  18. Cinderella

    Cinderella Alien Member

    [​IMG]


    Conference of the Big Three at Yalta makes final plans for the defeat of
    Germany. Here the "Big Three" sit on the patio together, Prime Minister
    Winston S. Churchill, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Premier Josef
    Stalin. February 1945.


    [​IMG]

    Faithful friend mourns American hero. Along with the many millions to
    mourn the passing of American hero, General George S. Patton, Jr., is his
    dog "Willie," the late general's pet bull terrier. Bad Nauheim, Germany.
    January 1946.
     
  19. sgthoskins

    sgthoskins Teufelhunden

    Pictures of that landing still f-ing amaze me. Those were some hard f-ing dudes.

    Made another poster this AM.


    [​IMG]
     
  20. Pvt. Cowboy

    Pvt. Cowboy Lemme take a selfie Staff Member

    Close Air Support!! Hahahahahaha!!!!

    Awesome. :D
     
  21. Cinderella

    Cinderella Alien Member

  22. CJIS

    CJIS MassCops Member

    Camp Leatherneck, Afghanistan
    With insurgent violence at its highest point ever, U.S. officials acknowledge they are not winning in Afghanistan. While vastly superior in training and equipment, the combined U.S. and NATO militaries are hamstrung in certain parts of the country by an entrenched and flexible insurgency that relies on low-tech tactics, intimidation and payoffs. President Barack Obama has promised to make the fight his focus in a way that former President George W. Bush did not. The Afghanistan fight, then going relatively well, became an afterthought in Washington, and always second in line for resources, following the 2003 U.S. invasion and occupation of Iraq.
    Here's a glimpse from Associated Press photographer David Guttenfelder of life with the U.S. Marines at Camp Leatherneck in Afghanistan's Helmand Province(17 images)

    Follow The Frame on Twitter at sacbee_theframe

    [​IMG]
    U.S. Marines from the 2nd Marine Expeditionary Battalion walk through the sand inside Camp Leatherneck in Afghanistan's Helmand province Monday June 8. Some 7,000 of the new U.S. troops ordered to Afghanistan are fanning out across the dangerous south on a mission to defeat the Taliban insurgency and to change the course of a war claiming American lives at a record pace. AP / David Guttenfelder

    MORE IMAGES



    [​IMG]
    A U.S. Marine from the 2nd Marine Expeditionary Brigade walks among fellow Marine footprints in the sand inside Camp Leatherneck in Afghanistan's Helmand province Tuesday June 9. AP / David Guttenfelder




    [​IMG]
    U.S. Marines from the 2nd Marine Expeditionary Battalion walk through the sand inside Camp Leatherneck in Afghanistan's Helmand province Monday June 8. AP / David Guttenfelder




    [​IMG]
    A U.S. Marine from the 2nd Marine Expeditionary Battalion walks through the sand inside Camp Leatherneck in Afghanistan's Helmand province Monday, June 8. AP / David Guttenfelder




    [​IMG]
    A U.S. Marine from the 2nd MEB, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marines stands guard at a market during a patrol in the town of Deleram in Afghanistan's Farah province Wednesday, June 10. AP / David Guttenfelder




    [​IMG]
    A U.S. Marine from the 2nd MEB, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marines guards as his platoon members enter their base they share with the Afghan National Police in the town of Deleram in Afghanistan's Farah province Wednesday, June 10. AP / David Guttenfelder




    [​IMG]
    U.S. Marines from the 2nd MEB, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marines watch as a helicopter takes of from the landing zone at forward operating base Golestan in Afghanistan's Farah province Thursday, June 11. AP / David Guttenfelder




    [​IMG]
    U.S. Marines from the 2nd Marine Expeditionary Brigade are taught how to use a robot to search for improvised explosive devices during training lesson at Camp Leatherneck in Afghanistan's Helmand province Tuesday June 9. AP / David Guttenfelder




    [​IMG]
    U.S. Marines from the 2nd Marine Expeditionary Brigade wait to enter the dining tent inside Camp Leatherneck in Afghanistan's Helmand province Tuesday June 9. AP / David Guttenfelder




    [​IMG]
    U.S. Marine Albert Rivas from San Juan, Puerto Rico and the 2nd Marine Expeditionary Brigade sits outside his tent at Camp Leatherneck in Afghanistan's Helmand province Tuesday June 9. AP / David Guttenfelder




    [​IMG]
    U.S. Marines from the 2nd Marine Expeditionary Brigade walk through blowing sand inside Camp Leatherneck in Afghanistan's Helmand province Tuesday, June 9. AP / David Guttenfelder




    [​IMG]
    A U.S. Marines from the 2nd MEB, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marines walks past an Afghan cemetery during a patrol in the town of Deleram in Afghanistan's Farah province Wednesday, June 10. AP / David Guttenfelder




    [​IMG]
    An elderly Afghan man looks on as a U.S. Marine from the 2nd MEB, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marines patrols in the town of Deleram in Afghanistan's Farah province Wednesday, June 10. AP / David Guttenfelder




    [​IMG]
    A police officer from the Afghan National Police stands guard at a police station in the town of Deleram in Afghanistan's Farah province Wednesday, June 10. AP / David Guttenfelder




    [​IMG]
    U.S. Marines from the 2nd Marine Expeditionary Brigade walk in blowing sand at Camp Leatherneck in Afghanistan's Helmand province Tuesday June 9. AP / David Guttenfelder




    [​IMG]
    U.S. Marines from the 2nd Marine Expeditionary Brigade rest inside a tent at Camp Leatherneck in Afghanistan's Helmand province Tuesday June 9. AP / David Guttenfelder




    [​IMG]
    A kitchen worker waits to use a portable toilet as two U.S. Marines from the 2nd Marine Expeditionary Battalion walk through the sand inside Camp Leatherneck in Afghanistan's Helmand province Monday June 8. AP / David Guttenfelder
     
  23. MSP75

    MSP75 Guest

  24. CJIS

    CJIS MassCops Member

  25. CJIS

    CJIS MassCops Member

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