Massachusetts Cop Forum banner

1 - 20 of 55 Posts

·
MassCops Angel
Joined
·
121,497 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
An overwhelming number of Bay Staters replying to a Suffolk University/WHDH Ch. 7 poll say the state's marijuana laws should go up in smoke.
The poll regarding questions set to appear on the Nov. 4 ballot shows that 72 percent of Greater Boston residents favor snuffing out criminal penalties for suspects carrying less than an ounce of pot, and replacing them with civil fines. Under the measure, a person stopped with marijuana would be given a $100 ticket and forced to forfeit the drug
"The public may be signaling that pursuing small-time marijuana users is a waste of taxpayer resources," said David Paleologos, director of the Political Research Bureau at Suffolk University. "This issue suggests there is a libertarian streak in the thinking of the Massachusetts voter."
The poll also found lingering resentment toward former Gov. Mitt Romney. State residents would reject likely Republican presidential nominee John McCain more heartily if he chose his former rival Romney as his running mate. The poll shows that 41 percent would be less likely to vote for a McCain/Romney ticket, while 24 percent were unswayed.
Bay Staters were also icy toward a ballot measure aimed at abolishing the income tax, with 50 percent opposed to eliminating income tax, and 15 percent undecided.
The pollsters gathered the data from 400 state residents who were contacted between July 31 and Aug. 3.

(5) Comments | Post / Read Comments

http://bostonherald.com/news/region...chusetts_looks_to_turn_over_new_leaf_on_pot_/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
How many of these people are residents of Massachusetts? I'm guessing the vast majority are college students who will be gone in a few years anyways.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,852 Posts
400 people hardly constitute a mandate from the voters.
 
G

·
Who were they calling?



The poll also found lingering resentment toward former Gov. Mitt Romney. State residents would reject likely Republican presidential nominee John McCain more heartily if he chose his former rival Romney as his running mate. The poll shows that 41 percent would be less likely to vote for a McCain/Romney ticket, while 24 percent were unswayed.
So what? Obama is winning Massachusetts no matter who McCain picks. Does it matter by how much? The Electoral College is winner take all.

One thing I learned from taking research methods in college is it's all in how you frame the question. If they're asking "Do you believe someone should be imprisoned for 6 months for a first offense marijuana possession charge" then of course people will say no, because they don't know that never happens in practice even though the law states that for the maximum sentence.
 

·
Needs more complaints
Joined
·
4,309 Posts
The reason why pot will never be legalized...is that most pot heads never get to the polls on time.

"Dude, I thought voting day was on a Wednesday..."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
The Electoral College is winner take all.
Quite True. The Electoral college will probably manipulate anything that will work in there favor. :hmmm: Grass will never be legal.

Drug. Awareness .Resistance .Education

"Pot is only the gateway drug kids. When you get bored of it, it will make you want to try harder/stronger drugs."

DARE was a good program when it was funded by the federal or state dept. Now most cities and town dont do it anymore.
 

·
MassCops Angel
Joined
·
121,497 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Area law enforcement say 'no' to marijuana decriminalization

By Brian Fraga
Standard-Times staff writer
September 19, 2008 6:00 AM

NEW BEDFORD - Make no mistake about it: law enforcement officials in Southeastern Massachusetts are strongly against decriminalizing smaller amounts of marijuana.
"Question 2 ignores the extreme effects drug legalization would have in Massachusetts," said Cape and Islands District Attorney Michael O'Keefe, who is leading the statewide charge against the November ballot initiative.
In a Thursday press conference on the steps of New Bedford Superior Court, Mr. O'Keefe was joined by a coterie of public officials that included Bristol County District Attorney C. Samuel Sutter as well as mayors, police chiefs, prosecutors, sheriffs, and business leaders from SouthCoast and Cape Cod.
Speaking at a podium with a prominently displayed "Vote No on 2" sign, several speakers warned that crime would increase and a dangerous message sent, especially to youths, if voters approve the initiative - which would create civil instead of criminal penalties for possessing an ounce or less of marijuana.
One ounce of marijuana has a street value of $600 and equates to approximately 60 individual sales, officials said.
"Just think of the message this would send to every single middle and high school student," Fall River Mayor Robert Correia said.
"The message this sends to our teens and young adults is that smoking marijuana is not a big deal, when it is," said Mr. Sutter, adding the measure will "incontrovertibly" lead to more drug usage.
Whitney A. Taylor, the campaign manager of the Committee for Sensible Marijuana Policy, the group advocating for the initiative, said the officials' comments clouded the ballot question's pragmatic aims.
"The issue first and foremost is that under Question 2, marijuana is still illegal," she said. "Legalization is not what this is about. We don't condone marijuana usage. We are for a smarter law enforcement approach."
Under Question 2, instead of arresting and charging individuals caught with one ounce or less of marijuana, police would issue a $100 fine. If juveniles were caught possessing marijuana, their parents or legal guardians would be notified and they would be required to complete 10 hours of community service.
Supporters argue that the current system penalizes individuals by annotating arrests for simple possession as part of their Criminal Offender Record Information, making it difficult for them to secure certain jobs, college loans and apartments.
Police counter that first-time offenders have their cases dismissed in court and their CORI sealed. Opponents argue the CORI is not always sealed and can still be distributed for years.
Also, supporters of the initiative argue that 11 other states, including New York and Maine, have similar laws and that the research indicates they do not have higher rates of marijuana use.
Citing a 2002 report by Harvard economist Jeffrey Miron, supporters also argue the changes will save taxpayers almost $30 million a year on arrests, bookings and preliminary court expenses.
New Bedford Police Chief Ronald P. Teachman argued that the group's figures are "bogus."
"The money still goes to the gangs that terrorize our neighborhoods," he said. "Why now do we want to take a step backwards with marijuana? We're going to make our streets unsafer, and at what cost?"
Thursday's press conference in New Bedford was part of a statewide campaign organized by the Coalition to Save Our Streets, the committee organized to oppose Question 2.
The controversy over the issue has spurred pitched political battles.
Supporters filed a legal complaint alleging the state's 11 district attorneys violated campaign finance laws by raising and spending money to defeat the initiative before forming their committee.
Meanwhile, opponents have attacked the legitimacy of the proponent group by pointing out that many of its donors are from outside the state, including George Soros, the international financier, who donated $400,000.

http://www.southcoasttoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080919/NEWS/809190324
 

·
MassCops Angel
Joined
·
121,497 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
What is law enforcement smoking to oppose Question 2?

All the suits who make a living - monetarily, politically and otherwise - off the criminal marijuana laws were there the other day.
There must have been 30 of them. Standing on the steps of the New Bedford Superior Court like a phalanx of armed guards, ready to protect the public against the enemy.
Protect us against what?
Why, those horrible marijuana laws, the ones that if we don't keep in place, everyone in Massachusetts under 18 will soon be heading for the corner drug dealer. As if any kid who wants to doesn't do that now.
You know the criminal marijuana possession laws.
They're the same laws that 11 other states have already eliminated (some of them as long ago as the 1970s) with little to no change in the rates of drug use.
You know the kind of places where they've decriminalized small amounts of marijuana, exotic places like Maine and Ohio. But don't go downeast on vacation - those Maine drug gangs are out of control!
Other states that have decriminalized marijuana include such libertine hotbeds as Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, Nebraska and Minnesota.
But there they stood the other day, Bristol and Barnstable counties' finest, all the folks employed by this big, big government business we call the War on Drugs. They as much as warned that we could become like China during the opium wars if those marijuana penalties are loosened.
These are the folks who are currently in charge of this so-called battle against drugs, the war that the country has failed to win for half a century. They were competing with each other for most alarmist comment of the day.
"This will lead to more violence," said Bristol County District Attorney Sam Sutter, dismissing out of hand the views of many mainstream citizens that prosecuting marijuana possession is both unreasonable and prohibitively expensive.
Mr. Sutter is nothing if not determined to prove he's tough on crime.
"This ridiculous initiative would put our children and young people in dangerous situations" with violent marijuana dealers, he intoned.
And "I don't want to hear," he said, those "specious" and "bogus" arguments that marijuana is like alcohol. Alcohol, he informed the media event, can have health benefits. You know, like wine, he said.
And tobacco? Why, that takes a long time to do damage, he informed.
Ah, Sam, say it ain't so.
Not to be outdone, Fall River Mayor Bob Correia trotted out the time-tested "gateway" argument.
"Marijuana," he said, is "the one they start our children off with!"
Ah, the children. It's always the children.
So on went the show, speaker after speaker pointing out that hard drug users are also marijuana users and that they inhabit a violent economy.
So what? These hoods are also alcohol users, and maybe a lot of them like pizza, too.
The only guy to bring a modicum of reality to the proceedings was Barnstable County Sheriff Jim Cummings. He sounded as if he knew he was trapped in a politically-correct soap box but dared not get out.
"This morning, in the Barnstable County correctional facility, no one there was serving time for 1 ounce or less of marijuana," he said.
The sheriff was conceding that no one even prosecutes for 1 ounce or less of marijuana now! But he quickly slipped back into the gateway argument, saying it's just "common sense" that decriminalizing marijuana sends the wrong message about other DRUGS!
So what presaged this courthouse gathering, along with the unanimous opposition to decriminalization of every sheriff and district attorney in the state?
Why, Ballot Question 2 of the Committee for Sensible Marijuana Policy.
The committee in November is putting an outrageous question before the people. "Wouldn't it make sense to make possession of an ounce or less of marijuana a civil offense punishable by a $100 fine?"
Here's a couple of facts to chew:
Jeffrey Miron, an economics lecturer at Harvard, estimates the state spent $29.5 million on 17,229 arrests involving marijuana possession in 2006. Now, many of those folks were undoubtedly charged with multiple crimes and the marijuana charge was used as leverage, but isn't that a little like charging social drinkers with drunken driving at an accident scene even though their blood alcohol is below the .08 limit?
A 2008 study - undertaken by, among others, the National Research Council - cited multiple research that found no clear relationship between drug criminalization and drug use. "As in the case of underage alcohol and tobacco use, current enforcement may have a stronger effect on where people carry or use drugs, rather than on whether they do so," the study concluded.
All the blue-shirts in the world speaking authoritatively won't change the fact that the 50-year drug war has failed relentlessly.
The simple fact is - as was proven during equally crime-ridden Prohibition - you can't enforce a law the public is determined to ignore.
The law enforcement types have it wrong. It's the Committee for Sensible Marijuana Policy that knows what it's talking about.

http://www.southcoasttoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080920/NEWS/809200328
 

·
Subscribing Member
Joined
·
6,688 Posts
according to the guys out seizing large amounts of weed , some of it comes from the north , is sold for cocaine or heroin and the hard drugs are shipped back up north.

the "BC" bud or hydro weed is far more potent that the weed some people smoked back in their collage days and perhaps these folks don't realize the potency or connection to hard drugs.
 

·
MassCops Angel
Joined
·
121,497 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Pot rally has cops fuming


Photo by Faith Ninivaggi
SMOKE SIGNALS: Supporters of marijuana legalization gathered on Boston Common yesterday to smoke, advocate and listen to tunes.

Marijuana legalization advocates openly smoked pot at the annual Boston Freedom Rally on Boston Common yesterday, spurring arrests by Boston police.
"It's one thing to protest the illegality of marijuana, that itself isn't illegal," said James Kenneally, BPD spokesman. "People have the right to free expression, but it's another thing to smoke marijuana, which is an illegal narcotic, during the protest."
The annual Boston Freedom Rally - described by organizers as "the largest marijuana reform gathering on the East Coast" - drew hundreds of stoners, activists and vendors to the park. They spent the bright, sunny afternoon touting their support for Question 2, which will appear on the ballot in November and would replace criminal penalties for possession of up to 1 ounce of marijuana with a fine of no more than $100.
"It's a thing where we can unite for a cause to legalize weed, man," said Howlin' Jack Boone, 27, of Waltham, lead singer of the rally's headline band, Graveyard BBQ. "This year we're hoping for decriminalization, next year it'll be a celebration."
The Massachusetts Cannabis Reform Coalition co-sponsored the event, along with the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws.
"We're close to winning the first major battle with Question 2, and MassCann won't stop until it's legal, regulated and taxed," said Steven Epstein, co-founder of the coalition.
Yesterday's rally was "a combination of education and activism," said Allen St. Pierre, NORML executive director.
Or, as guitarist "Brown Bag" Johnson of Graveyard BBQ put it, "We're fighting against the man, burning the rope and having a good time."
The arrests ruined the mellow mood for some participants.
"It's a real fear. When they arrest you, it's quick and swift," said pot enthusiast Rachel Elorrisa, 29, of New Hampshire who admitted to "lighting up" before the rally. "Police are out here in street clothes, and when they arrest, you have to sit in that holding area all day."

http://bostonherald.com/news/region...juana_rally_nets_arrests/srvc=home&position=2
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,852 Posts
As drummer "Douchebag" Dan the Ragman put it "It's like a real bummer man...the cops and all. I mean I'm here in my tiedyed hemp shirt, Birkenstocks, matted down hair and BO covered by patchouli oil, and they're like arresting us as we smoke some grass man. Hell, I just wanted to listen to some Phish and read some lame poetry man, and the cops are here man, arresting us in public and everything. Fight the power man...question authority!"
 

·
MassCops Angel
Joined
·
121,497 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Pro-pot backers aim high

Out-of-state funds fuel Mass. effort

Activists who want joints sold over the counter like cigarettes are bankrolling a Bay State pot referendum backers claim will simply clear the air of piddling marijuana cases choking the court system.
The Committee for Sensible Marijuana Policy, which placed Question 2 on the November ballot, collected from the Marijuana Policy Project $200,000, about 30 percent of its total. Indeed, about 90 percent of the $635,000 the committee has raised comes from people who live out of state.
On its Web site, the marijuana project's mission statement states clearly: "Adults who use marijuana should be able to obtain it from legally regulated establishments and not from illegal drug dealers."
Woody Kaplan, a Hub real estate developer and self-styled "provocateur" who donated $10,000 to the state ballot initiative, also backs the call for legal pot sales.
"I believe taxing and regulating is a much better way than what the ballot question proposes," said Kaplan, who held a $250-a-head fundraiser for the Marijuana Policy Prject earlier this month.
"This is government making a choice that something that is clearly destructive - alcohol - is OK, but somebody smoking marijuana isn't," Kaplan told the Herald.
Daniel R. Lewis, 62, of Coral Gables, Fla. - the scion of the Progressive Insurance fortune and a self-confessed former toker - also would like to see grass legalized and regulated.
"I think it's a relatively harmless drug, as compared to alcohol," said Lewis, who gave $5,000 to the pot project.
The group also counts among its backers actor Jack Black, talk show host Bill Maher and former wrestler and Minnesota Gov. Jesse Ventura, and uses Hugh Hefner's Playboy Mansion for its lavish fund-raisers.
If passed, the ballot initiative would make having an ounce or less of marijuana a civil offense punishable by a $100 fine. Minors' parents would be notified, and the kids would have to complete a drug awareness program.
Middlesex County District Attorney Gerard Leone slammed the pot activists as out of touch and predicted the measure would be a gateway to weaker drug laws.
"Question 2 will allow a foot in the door to people with a misguided, radical agenda," Leone said.
Whitney Taylor, campaign manager, pointed to a Suffolk University poll that showed 72 percent of voters support the ballot question.
"They are not out of the mainstream," Taylor said. "They are the mainstream."
Kaplan, a 66-year-old board member of the Godless America PAC, which "mobilizes nonbelievers for political activism," said he's heard it all before.
"Same-sex opponents said if you allow same-sex marriage, people would marry dogs," Kaplan said. "Yeh, right. It's just fear tactics, and it's absurd."

(10) Comments | Post / Read Comments

http://bostonherald.com/news/region...m_high:_Out-of-state_funds_fuel_Mass__effort/
 

·
MassCops Angel
Joined
·
121,497 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Coakley dismisses marijuana question complaint

Associated Press - September 30, 2008 5:04 PM ET

BOSTON (AP) - Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley has rejected a complaint by backers of a pro-marijuana ballot question against the state's 11 district attorneys.
The Committee for Sensible Marijuana Policy filed the complaint against the Massachusetts District Attorneys Association saying they made false statements about the question.
The committee pointed to a statement on the District Attorneys Association Web site saying if the question is approved "any person may carry and use marijuana at any time."
If the question passed, possession of marijuana would still be illegal and anyone carrying or using marijuana would face a $100 fine.
Coakley's office said there's nothing in the proposed law that explicitly forbids public use of the drug.

http://www.wwlp.com/Global/story.asp?S=9100469
 

·
Public Trough Feeder
Joined
·
5,181 Posts
What, are we supposed to carry postal scales in the trunk of the cruiser to make sure you're not locking a stoner up on .98 oz of weed? Let these retards blaze all they want. Just include an indemnity clause in the statute so that cops aren't getting sued for the symantics of the weighind process if they lock up for < 1 oz. Some lawyer will argue stems and seeds don't count and your ass will riding the train to federal court.
 
G

·
I don't like the idea of just making a penalty less severe either. However, I would personally rather see pot legalized then taxed heavily. Lets face it, it's easier for a 16 year old to obtain pot than alcohol. Why? Because the corner liquor store carries a license to sell it. The corner drug dealer does not. If you eliminate the need for the corner drug dealer by having it sold in stores, you lessen the chances of teenagers from obtaining it.
Sure, teens get alcohol too, and they will continue to get weed.
But think about it, how many people on the street sell cigarettes or alcohol? Not many (Well maybe a few now since a carton of cigarettes is $40 in NH and $70 in Mass!). And just like liquor, you could control the price and quality so the dealers are out of business. Then just apply the same laws/rules about OUI ect like alcohol has.

PS: I don't smoke pot, and never will. Just thought I'd mention that.
 
1 - 20 of 55 Posts
Top