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NEW YORK -- Rapper Lil' Kim escaped a stiff prison sentence Wednesday after telling a judge she was a "God-fearing good person" who regretted lying to a federal grand jury about a 2001 shootout outside a Manhattan radio station.

The Grammy winner was sentenced to one year and one day for perjury and conspiracy — a term far less than the three years and seven months sought by prosecutors.

U.S. District Judge Gerard Lynch said he had weighed the public perception of sending a young black entertainer to prison far longer than Martha Stewart, who spent five months in prison and remains under house arrest after a false statements conviction.

Lynch suggested Lil' Kim (real name: Kimberly Jones) deserved more time because she had lied about a violent crime, not a white-collar scheme. He also noted that unlike Stewart, she took the witness stand at her trial earlier this year and repeated her lies.

"You sat right next to me there and stared in the eyes of the jurors, and you tried to charm them and you tried to fake them out," Lynch said.

But the judge also credited Lil' Kim with returning to court Wednesday and admitting she had lied all along to protect members of her entourage.

"At the time I thought it was the right thing to do, but I now know it was wrong," she said, her voice breaking.

Lil' Kim said she wanted to "take complete blame" for the actions of her assistant, Monique Dopwell, who's awaiting sentencing for the same crimes.

She also asked the judge "to consider my entire life's work and not just the days in the grand jury and on the witness stand in the courtroom. I'm a God-fearing, good person."

Lil' Kim, who was ordered to report to prison Sept. 19, left the courthouse without speaking to reporters.

Some fans who showed up outside said they were relieved that the sentence wasn't harsher.

"I'm just excited 'cause it's not that long," said Alfredo Borbon, 22, a waiter who wore a pair of boots with the rapper's name on them.
 
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Barbrady";p="68464 said:
U.S. District Judge Gerard Lynch said he had weighed the public perception of sending a young black entertainer to prison far longer than Martha Stewart, who spent five months in prison and remains under house arrest after a false statements conviction.
So now sentences are based on race. :huh:
 

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Ya Really!

Imagine race entering into the equation
:shock:
 

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The difference is that Martha Stewart lied about a stock deal she did with an insider trader.

Lil Kim lied (to protect her boyzzz) about a shooting which she new who did it.


Lets see a violent crime vs a non violent crime which person should get more time?????? hummmmm
 

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Gerard E. Lynch
Paul J. Kellner Professor of Law
Office 435 West 116th Street, Room 835
New York NY 10027
Tel 212-854-8232
Fax 212-854-1566
Email glyn[email protected]

B.A., Columbia, 1972; J.D., 1975. Appointed U.S. District Judge for the Southern District of New York by President Clinton in 2000.

That should shed some light on his reasoning

Joined Columbia faculty in 1977, following clerkships with Judge Wilfred Feinberg of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, 1975-76, and Justice William J. Brennan, Jr., of the U.S. Supreme Court, 1976-77, and was vice dean of the Law School, 1992-97. Has been visiting professor or lecturer at Hebrew University, Jerusalem; National Police Academy (Tokyo); Tokyo University; University of Buenos Aires; and Universities of Leiden and Amsterdam. Served as assistant U.S. attorney, Southern District of New York, 1980-83, prosecuting white-collar criminal cases and serving as chief appellate attorney. Returned to that office as chief of the criminal division, 1990-92. Was appointed counsel to numerous city, state, and federal commissions and special prosecutors investigating public corruption, including the Iran/Contra investigation, where among other responsibilities he briefed and argued the prosecution position in the appeal of Oliver North. Briefed and argued cases in federal appellate courts, including the Supreme Court, as a cooperating attorney with the American and New York Civil Liberties Unions, and has extensive experience as a defense attorney in state and federal cases. Member of the American Law Institute, and of various bar associations and advisory committees. Has published and lectured on the federal racketeering laws, sentencing, plea bargaining and other aspects of criminal law, constitutional theory, and legal ethics. Received the student-voted Willis Reese Award for Excellence in Teaching (1994) and was the first member of the law faculty to receive the University-wide President's Award for Outstanding Teaching (1997). Principal teaching and research areas include criminal law and procedure, sentencing, and professional responsibility.
 
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