Massachusetts Cop Forum banner
21 - 30 of 30 Posts
G

·
I disagree Bluejay. Electric cars can only go so far. Even if you use the newer lithium ion, which are safer to use, you still need to go thru the arduous and expensive task of replacing the batteries after only 10's of thousands of miles. Hybrid owners that bought their hybrids in the green rush in the late 90's/early 00's will find out soon that those nice tax breaks they got for buying the cars does not cover the charges to replace them batteries.

Fluids will always be a problem with transportation. If its not anti-freeze or sulfuric acid, it'll be spent fuel cell imulsion or radioactive substances. There will always be a need to cool or haress energy thru hydrolics or liquids.

The eletric auto will have some uses, like taxi service or little 'point a to b' cars. like the zipcars we have in use now. But I feel the main stay for our next big break thru in transportation will be fuel cells; more importantly hydrogen fuel cells. You will see LP cars, or natural gas cars, maybe even putting a nuclear reactor in those cruise ships and not just in military ventures. Turbines in cars are not practical because of the noise and we cannot live with the internal combustion engine in its current form for much longer. Synthetic fuels or renewable fuels will help, but your still burning hydrocarbon chains, still producing byproducts like pollution.

Anyone with an earned (not honorary) doctoral degree from a legitimately accredited school is entitled to call themself "doctor", regardless of what their field of study happens to be. The myth that only physicians are "real doctors" is pretty laughable when you read the history of the word "doctor", which in ancient times referred to a learned person.

Dr. Phil McGraw, while being a pompous blowhard, has an earned doctoral degree in clinical psychology from the University of North Texas.
I was under the impression that his license was revoked for inappropriate proceedings with a client. But after looking at the info again, I see he was reprimanded and had to go to ethics classes, but his license was not revoked entirely. my bad:-#
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
I disagree Bluejay. Electric cars can only go so far. Even if you use the newer lithium ion, which are safer to use, you still need to go thru the arduous and expensive task of replacing the batteries after only 10's of thousands of miles. Hybrid owners that bought their hybrids in the green rush in the late 90's/early 00's will find out soon that those nice tax breaks they got for buying the cars does not cover the charges to replace them batteries.

Fluids will always be a problem with transportation. If its not anti-freeze or sulfuric acid, it'll be spent fuel cell imulsion or radioactive substances. There will always be a need to cool or haress energy thru hydrolics or liquids.

The eletric auto will have some uses, like taxi service or little 'point a to b' cars. like the zipcars we have in use now. But I feel the main stay for our next big break thru in transportation will be fuel cells; more importantly hydrogen fuel cells. You will see LP cars, or natural gas cars, maybe even putting a nuclear reactor in those cruise ships and not just in military ventures. Turbines in cars are not practical because of the noise and we cannot live with the internal combustion engine in its current form for much longer. Synthetic fuels or renewable fuels will help, but your still burning hydrocarbon chains, still producing byproducts like pollution.

I was under the impression that his license was revoked for inappropriate proceedings with a client. But after looking at the info again, I see he was reprimanded and had to go to ethics classes, but his license was not revoked entirely. my bad:-#
Tesla is sporting their car at 50k per battery... so assuming you gave up vanity, you could use battery longer than that even. The batteries, though large, are simple devices that can easily be made and recycled, replacing them will simple replace other typical service fees, such as broken belts.

I think hydrogen/electric vehicles will prevail. If we can find a safe way to store hydrogen, that is.

Consider that even after five years and an aggressive 100,000 miles of driving, the Tesla Roadster pack will have more energy storage available than the Gen2 EV1
 
G

·
Here go register for a tesla roadster
http://www.teslamotors.com/buy/resyourcar.php

Only 109,000 bux for one, plus import.

Spent batteries are one of the leading causes of pollution due to runoff from landfills and recycling centers. Electric cars run off of standard modern day batteries are folly. They are not practical, nor efficent. hydrogen fuel cells give off less waste products and do not require the disposal preparations that batteries do.

50K off of batteries huh? Raise your hand if you'd be willing to change out your block every 50K miles. If toyota can make a camry last well into 300K, then a 300K battery system should be next. Or just go with a fuel cell.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,172 Posts
"...New advances in lithium batteries have made it environmentally safe, and for the first time- both practical and green.

The technology is there now. A..."
There are still heat problems with lithium batteries...not to mention the environmental disaster obtaining the raw materials for manufacturing them. Too, what of the Hg issues?

The theory for logic circuits existed in 1865. The know how for semi-conducters and transistors existed in the twenties.

The materials to make the technologies a reality did not. This is true today with batteries and fuel cells. Until hydrogen storage problems are solved (materials: all the containers leak like a sieve), you can forget that fuel as well...
 
G

·
Da Vinci had the airplane imagined and model done before anyone else even dreamed of lift. The concept is there as is the science.. We just have to wait for reality to catch up with imagination.

I doubt I'll see the hydrogen car or even a practical fuel cell, but the generation after me probally will live off them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Here go register for a tesla roadster
http://www.teslamotors.com/buy/resyourcar.php

Only 109,000 bux for one, plus import.

Spent batteries are one of the leading causes of pollution due to runoff from landfills and recycling centers. Electric cars run off of standard modern day batteries are folly. They are not practical, nor efficent. hydrogen fuel cells give off less waste products and do not require the disposal preparations that batteries do.

50K off of batteries huh? Raise your hand if you'd be willing to change out your block every 50K miles. If toyota can make a camry last well into 300K, then a 300K battery system should be next. Or just go with a fuel cell.
Well, the battery pops out and you just throw a new one in. It's the same as replacing a battery now, but bigger. take it into the shop, and they do it for you. Tesla recycles the batteries too. The downside to hydrogen cells atm is that they tend to degrade way, way faster than 50k. Pollution (oh the irony) in the air can kill active hydrogen cells.

That said, both technologies would make for amazing cars if they could get over their matching cruxes/

Something that might interest you is to find that there IS in fact a safe way to store decent amounts of hydrogen.. however it got shot down because it uses chemicals deemed to cause cancer or whatever. Either it's bullshit from the company (unlikely from an already successful science supply co. ask yourself why they would bother to hoax when they're already well known and an established business) or somebody covered it up.

http://www.switch2hydrogen.com/h2.htm

Check it out. I don't believe it until i see it, but if that works the way they claim it does? It could very well be the first stepping block to the answer. The trick with hydrogen is to store ENOUGH of it without it being volatile- or make it as you go.

That is to say, United Nuclear claims to have a hydrogen stoarge system that works and is safe. They aren't asking for investors, money, etc- in fact they will not even accept any support, so that leads me away from thinking it's a hoax. I think they've been keeping it a relative secret and are planning on jumping on it real quick here...

008 We are in the process of moving all operations to Laingsburg, Michigan. Once relocated there, the first order of business will be to get employees hired and our retail Scientific Sales division up & running.
The reason we're doing this first is because our Scientific Sales division is what finances the Hydrogen Fuel System Research & Development.
Our scientific equipment sales office will be located on Grand River St. in the middle of downtown Laingsburg.
Once this is out of the way, we will secure our lease on the building for our Hydrogen Fuel Systems division. At the same time we'll be hiring local employees by tapping into the gigantic pool of talented people that were laid off from the automotive industry in Michigan. These folks, already familiar with the auto industry, will be a big help in getting things up to speed and into production as quickly as possible.
Those who have been following our progress are aware of the road blocks we ran into on both a Federal and State level attempting to make our system available.
With the state of Michigan behind us, hopefully we can avoid any future problems and move ahead at maximum speed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,172 Posts
I checked your link and read through the postings there. Full disclosure, I am not a pessimist, but I am a sceptic. I find any business plan that includes moving to Michigan dubious. Why would a company with limited (they neither have, nor want, investors...which is also worrisome) resources seek to establish a neophyte company, manufacturing a new and supposedly revolutionary technology in an area with a higher overhead than many other places in the country (unions, heat, et cetera...). I find their claim regarding laid-off workers from the automotive industry bringing experience, blah blah, to their venture rather absurd. Experience on an assembly line? Sure. Experience handling hydrogen gas and constructing complicated stroage/extraction tanks? Nope. They can be trained, of course...but so can others in more friendly buisienss climes. If their products funtion exactly as they claim , the demand will be so great as to require them to expand at a prodigious rate. That takes capital, which, if the television news is any indicator, is in very short supply at this time. So they will need at least private investors. Whom they don't want. In this economic climate I don't foresee this enterprise happening any time soon.
 
G

·
I checked your link and read through the postings there. Full disclosure, I am not a pessimist, but I am a sceptic. I find any business plan that includes moving to Michigan dubious. Why would a company with limited (they neither have, nor want, investors...which is also worrisome) resources seek to establish a neophyte company, manufacturing a new and supposedly revolutionary technology in an area with a higher overhead than many other places in the country (unions, heat, et cetera...). I find their claim regarding laid-off workers from the automotive industry bringing experience, blah blah, to their venture rather absurd. Experience on an assembly line? Sure. Experience handling hydrogen gas and constructing complicated stroage/extraction tanks? Nope. They can be trained, of course...but so can others in more friendly buisienss climes. If their products funtion exactly as they claim , the demand will be so great as to require them to expand at a prodigious rate. That takes capital, which, if the television news is any indicator, is in very short supply at this time. So they will need at least private investors. Whom they don't want. In this economic climate I don't foresee this enterprise happening any time soon.
I agree. Sure you can get so many employees from michigan, but like DCS said, its not the proper location for this sort of venture. If you want some highly educated and experienced auto workers, then hire them. I'm sure many of them have so much to hold onto in places like Flint, Michigan that they would never leave and move to a new part of the country for a new job with a great salary.



I feel this sorta operation needs to be in a place more like the silicon valley of the early 90's. I think its a great idea and has many applications, but like someone else said, until you can get a container that is nigh unbreakable, such like the new containers that will be used to transport nuclear waste to the storage facility at Yucca mountain, this is not practical. We'd have a pinto-type accident at every fender-bender.
 
21 - 30 of 30 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top