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Israel's top cop busts traffic chief for speeding

Sun Oct 10, 5:26 PM ET


JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Israel's police chief has dismissed a senior traffic officer after catching him speeding, media reports have said.

They said Chief Superintendent Moshe Karadi spotted David Gaz, commander of traffic police in southern Israel, driving at 140 km (88 miles) an hour last Wednesday on a highway where the limit was 110 km (70 miles) an hour and pulled him over.


Karadi took over the top police post several months ago vowing to reduce the number of road accidents.
 

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This reminds me of a bit of stupidity that occurred when I was still in Texas about six years ago.

The county commissioners in my county had been getting complaints from citizens that the patrol sheriff deputies were speeding around the county when not responding to a call (blue lights or siren not on)

The commissioners, based on one of the weird Texas statues that states the county constable is the only official that can arrest the county sheriff, instructed the county constables and their deputies to start writing speeding violations when sheriff patrol vehicles were observed speeding. :lol: Odd thing though, none of us deputies ever observed a speeding violation.

Interesting footnote: The one Constable who actually wrote some violations ended up resigning from office rather then face charges of viewing pornography on the county computer system. This was as a result of an investigation by the sheriff dept's detective division. :spank:

There was always something going on to make things interesting down there!!
 

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Interesting..

In Indiana, only the Coroner (a countywide elected position) can arrest the Sheriff. Deputies can be arrested by any law enforcement officer.

Entertaining!
Bryan
 

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Israel's top cop busts traffic chief for speeding

Sun Oct 10, 5:26 PM ET

JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Israel's police chief has dismissed a senior traffic officer after catching him speeding, media reports have said.

They said Chief Superintendent Moshe Karadi spotted David Gaz, commander of traffic police in southern Israel, driving at 140 km (88 miles) an hour last Wednesday on a highway where the limit was 110 km (70 miles) an hour and pulled him over.

Karadi took over the top police post several months ago vowing to reduce the number of road accidents.
He got dismissed for getting nailed going 18 mph over the limit? jeez, if we did that here - there wouldn't be any Police Officers left :lol: :shock:

Well, maybe he thought he saw an incoming missle and decided it was a good time to get the hell out of the town he was in :shock:
 

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In Texas the primary government is County. For example the county that I lived in had a land area about the size of Mass but, had only about 15 incorporated cities.(there are no towns in Texas) Therefore about 95% of the county relied on county services only. Just so you don't think I'm talking about the boonies the northern part of Austin was in the our county as well as the corporate headquarters of DELL computer.

The Sheriff (elected official) is the chief law enforcement officer of the county. Has responsiblity for the county jail, and is responsible for supporting the county court.(bailiffing)

Each county is split into 1 or more precincts. (my county had 4)

The Constable(elected official) is the chief enforcement officer of the precinct and is responsible for supporting the precinct court.(bailiffing)
Oddly enough though Texas law makes the Constables jusristiction the entire county and all abbutting counties to the county he/she is elected in.

In my county, the on the streets working relationship was actually pretty good. Both the sheriff and constable deputies were dispatched by the sheriff's dispatch center. Dispatching was fair based on availibility of unit.(dispatchers were able to view on computer screen where we were and status.) And we all recognized eachothers agencies street supervisors (sgts, lts) as if we were one. (got a clue now why the commisioners speeding thing wasn't gonna work!!!!)
 

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Hmmm. That's interesting. So one night a person may dial 911 and get a sheriff response, the next night the same person might dial 911 and get a constable response.

I didn't think it was possible, but that's worse than this state.

You have state, county, municipal, constables......where do the parish police fit in?
 

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Heavens to Mergatroid! 80-90 is my patrol speed.

What a hero...especially since there are no studies that conclusively show that excessive speed causes collisions. Schwanz-munde.
 

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Hmmm. That's interesting. So one night a person may dial 911 and get a sheriff response, the next night the same person might dial 911 and get a constable response.

I didn't think it was possible, but that's worse than this state.

You have state, county, municipal, constables......where do the parish police fit in?
Here's an Indiana Comparison.

Small towns with three of less officers can have "Town Marshals" and two "Deputy Marshals" - they attend a four week academy, not the full course, and have law enforcement authority throughout the state. Some Town Marshals make $40 - $50k (which goes alot farther there than here).

Cities (or departments with more than three officers) have "City Police Departments" with a Chief and then whatever command structure their city puts into place. Civil Service only if the city decides to have it - very different than here. Some unions. They attend 14 week Indiana Law Enforcement Academy.

Unincorporated areas (which is most of the state) throughout the county - law enforcement is provided by a County Sheriff in all 92 counties. They are elected every 4 years and can only serve 8 years consecutively (Indiana has term limits in most positions).

Sheriffs are the "primary law enforcement officer" according to the state constitution. They appoint a Chief Deputy (outside of merit board - does not have to be current LEO) - and a Matron (must be female) - other structure depends on County Board. My county had a Sheriff, a Chief Deputy (who was appointed from the ranks), a Sergeant, and six deputies. Civil Service Protection through a Merit Board. Sheriff may also appoint reserves (who must attend 3 week academy and serve without pay) and Special Deputies (such as Probation, Community Corrections, etc). Sheriff runs jail and enforces court orders - as well as provides primary law enforcement. Deputies attended full 14 week Indiana Law Enforcement Academy.

State Police patrol highways primarily. Had own training academy.

Conservation Police patrol parks/forests and enforce gaming laws. Had own training academy + usually a federal commission.

Excise Police enforce liquor laws and alcohol regulation - not many of them. Had own training academy.

Very different than here..

Bryan
 

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Hmmm. That's interesting. So one night a person may dial 911 and get a sheriff response, the next night the same person might dial 911 and get a constable response.

I didn't think it was possible, but that's worse than this state.

You have state, county, municipal, constables......where do the parish police fit in?
first off didn't have parrish police.

Anyway, it does seem mixed up when I read my own post butttttt, it actually worked quite well.

First off, as I've said before, a cop was a cop was a cop in Texas. Everone had to meet the standard 720hr(18 weeks) academy. Some agencies had additional requirements. DPS Troopers(read state police) had another 4 (or 6 I don't remember)weeks on top of that.Constables and their deputies had 2 additional weeks, and so on.The point is regardless of your agency or title (including reserves, parttime, whatever) you didn't exercise police powers unless you had your peace officer license from the state and you didn't get that unless you attended a full academy and passed the state exam.

Back to the county I lived in. Deputy sheriffs and deputy constables were considered county officers and most cititzens didn't know or care about the differance.Also in the county there was usually 2-3 DPS Troopers, A couple of Alcohol and Beverage Control Agents and a few game wardens and school district police. The county communication system was such that county dispatch had contact with all and all of us had direct cruiser to cruiser capability with each other and the municipals as well. For the most part we all worked off the Sheriff's channel at night any way.

Now back to Clouseau's 911 comment

if you dialed 911 and

you lived within the boundries of one of the cities you'd get a city po. (unless the city didn't have a police dept and some didn't)

you lived in county and it was a routine call you'd usually get Sheriff's deputy, sometimes constable's deputy.

you lived in county and it was urgent call, "shots fired" "man with gun" "fight in progress" , etc. you'd get whoever was closest and that includes sheriff or constable deputy, dps trooper, abc agent, or game warden and for that matter it could be one of the municipal cops or school district cops if you were within spitting distance of the city or school district line.(in texas defne spitting distance as 3-5 miles.)

Now as I've said in other posts there was no pissing contests or pecking order issues between agencies. Yes we all had our focus areas and tended to our own business but, when there was a call that required immediate action whoever was closest took it and did what needed to be done until the responsible agency officer got there. At the end everyone said thanks for the help and went back to their areas. That's how we were able to cover an area the size of Mass with only about 20 units out on the road.
(that's the total including sheriff, constable,DPS, TABC, and School Districts , doesn't include the municipals which would be about another 20-25 which stayed in the city limits ecept as above.)
 

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[quote="texdep @ Mon October 11, 2004 5:29 pm"][
first off didn't have parrish police.

Anyway, it does seem mixed up when I read my own post butttttt, it actually worked quite well.
[/quote]


Your post was clear. Just seemed the jurisdictional aspect of it could get a little confusing.
As you stated, as long as it works.

When one can drive for 4 days and still be in the same state, you have to do what you got to do.

My mistake, it was Luisiana that had parish police. Maybe Texas had township police or something of that nature.
 
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