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Hey Folks I wish all a happy new years and I hope 2005 bring a lot of a happiness

I'm currently a student and I'm thinking in becoming a dispatcher and I have done a ot or research and this board has been a great tools in learning
I have been a radio Amateur and a scanner amateur for about 6 years and i'm really familliar with LEO procedure and regaulation and i need to study more and pass the dispatcher Exam

I have a question :

the Leaps-Cjis Terminal : does it just take only command ??? ( like MS-dos you need to always type a command )or is their a GUI and the ability to click
I know there are some software like ominxxforce and locate plus that offer the nice GUI
 

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Re: I'm thinking in a Dispacher Career

i'm a police officer, not a Dispatcher, but i offer this... Knowledge of computers and computer programs is the least of an emergency dispatcher's concerns. You will be taught how to run the different computer tasks that 9-1-1 Dispatchers must do. To be truly qualified and respected as a police dispatcher you must have attributes that cannot be taught - - intelligence, common sense, coolness under pressure and the ability to communicate clearly and concisively... As a 9-1-1 Emergency Dispatcher you are a critical cog in the machine. Never say things like "Fled scene in a blue vehicle"... is it pale blue or navy blue ? a van, suv, pickup truck or sedan ? 2 or 4 door ? any distinguishing features ?Same with descriptions of suspects.....- With emergency calls to a residence .. - What distinguishing features are there ? A specific color and type of vehicle in the driveway, a brief description of the color and type of house, some other thing that might help locate the residence if, as is not uncommon, the houses are not visibly numbered...? Emergency Dispatchers cannot be complacent. Always get a call back number, be curious, get something other than a vague description, be cool under pressure and always remember that your actions make a huge difference. Good Dispatchers are A O K and big time respected in my book. Common Sense and Intelligence - NOT computer savvy, make the difference in emergency 9-1-1 communications. By the way, isn't it time that full time emergency dispatchers get "weight" points for experience, like veterans do, on civil service exams ??
 

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So you want to be a Dispatcher?

Please do not take this as a bashing. I support anyone that whats to become a Dispatcher.

1st do not use it as a stepping stone to become a police officer, firefighter or EMT. This is a profession of its own and the people that do the hiring are looking to hire career Dispatchers.

It is good that you have a basic knowledge dealing with radios, scanners and procedures. This probably inadvertently helped you with being able to multi-task.

The job is much more then radios, phone, and computers.

Being able to handle a ton of stuff both crazy and mundane at the same time is important. Being able to be the calm voice on the hone, radio or in person is paramount.

Taking heat from EVERYONE and I do mean EVERYONE is harder then it seems.

Here are some links that may help you decide if it is for you.

So you want to be a Dispatcher?
http://www.911dispatch.com/job_file/job.html

Public Safety Dispatcher: Job & Testing Resources
http://www.911dispatch.com/job_file/job.html

Test you knowledge with "WHO WANTS TO BE POLICE DISPATCHER"
http://www.peace-officers.com/content/million/c/whocstart.shtml
 

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Having worked on both sides of the desk, I'll chime in here and offer my two cents. Your computer knowledge will be helpfull because you will probably be able to learn operation of the CJIS/LEAPS computer, E911 system, and departments dispatch software CJIS easier. A good working knowledge of how to acess requested information and perform searches and queries within the specific system will make your job easier, thus keeping the officers on the other end of the radio happy and safe. Finding info and relaying it as soon as possible, especially safety items such as if a person or household members has FID,LTC, Criminal History, etc... before the unit gets to the call are some of the basics. An intricate knowledge of how the CAD program works (ie: programming) is not really necessary, being able to use the system as a tool for calls and during the investigation process is however.

Dispatching is a good way to establish yourself in the law enforcement profession. Whether you have asperations of becoming a police officer or not, take the job seriously, have a professional attitude and appearence, and knowledge of how to communicate effectivly when typing reports/log entries or verbally (in person and on the radio). You'll need to stay updated on such things as department procedures/policies and a basic understanding of laws helps too, especially case law/procedures for gathering of information. Staying educated is a plus.

MCOA is 100% correct, you take heat from everyone, hopefully the department you work for has some good officers that respect the job you do. The more effective you are, the more respect you'll get, but as with everything it takes a while to gain that. Remember, your the person on the other end of the radio if the officer or firefighter is in the sh*t and calling for help. Good luck.
 
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