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I saw this on Boston.com

Lawmakers quietly move another batch of bills
December 27, 2004

BOSTON -- Beacon Hill lawmakers quietly approved another batch of bills Monday, from an increase in the minimum age for people wanting to become police officers to a proposal allowing school children with diabetes to administer their medicine.

The crush of bills comes as the Legislature faces the end of its two year session Jan. 4. Any bills not approved must start the legislative process again in January.

The police bill would bar anyone from taking the test to become a police officer until they have reached their 21st birthday. The current age is 19.



Now if they could just do something to decrease the max age....
and toughen up the Academies......
 

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So..........
The treasurer will be issuing refunds to those youngsters who just signed up for the April Civil Circus test real soon right?
:cry:
 

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soxrock75";p="50947 said:
So, those who score perfect on the tests now have 2 fewer years to not get a call or a card from Civil Circus ?
It means there are that many less people taking the test so we have a better chance this time around.

Scott :rock:
 

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Older police recruits favored
Thursday, December 30, 2004
By PATRICK JOHNSON
[email protected]

Like fine wine, police only improve with age.

Or so at least goes the thinking behind a bill to bump up the minimum age to become a police officer in Massachusetts from 19 to 21 years.

The measure, approved by the state House and Senate this week and sent to Gov. W. Mitt Romney, would make the minimum age for becoming a police officer the same as the age for legally drinking alcohol or carrying a firearm.

Chief Anthony R. Scott of Holyoke said the change is logical and overdue.

"If you're going into a bar to enforce the law, you should be able to get in the bar," he said.

Last September, Holyoke hired 10 police officers, all of whom were between the ages of 23 and 35.

Scott said he has never hired an officer younger than 21.

"I don't care if you're 19, you're still a teenager," he said. "That's how the public looks at you, as a teenager."

Easthampton Police Chief Raymond W. Sliz said that with age comes experience.

"It's kind of a fast-paced world, and the more life experiences you have, the more successful you'll be as a police officer," he said.

The bill also applies to Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority police, state police, campus police at state colleges and the University of Massachusetts, and public safety officers in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife.

Minimum age requirements for police officers vary across the country.

Some departments, such as Minneapolis and Detroit, hire officers as young as 18. New York City requires officers to be 21 and to have completed either 60 college credits or have served two years in the armed forces.

Romney, who is on vacation, can approve, veto, or amend the bill.

The bill's sponsor, Rep. Paul Casey, D-Winchester, proposed it as part of larger legislation to get weapons out of the hands of teens and young adults.

The new age requirement brings an added benefit of recruiting applicants who have greater "emotional maturity," he said.

"Some people might say it's age discrimination, but it's a bona fide occupational requirement," he said.

George DiBlasi, legislative director for the Massachusetts Chiefs of Police Association and the former police chief of Norwood, said his group has not taken a position on the bill, but he feels the maturity argument is a valid point.

"That doesn't mean a 19-year-old isn't qualified, but there is something to be said for maturity," he said.

DiBlasi said that as a police chief, he sometimes hired officers who were 19, but in general he preferred to hire older people.

Chief Sliz said that a 21-year-old applicant will probably have completed some college courses, while a 19-year-old applicant could still be in high school.

Despite preferring older applicants, Easthampton hired last year two reserve officers, Brent Dzialo and Chad Alexander, who were each 20 years old.

Alexander, who recently turned 21, and Dzialo cover for the 26 full-time officers during illness and vacations. Each carries a firearm and has the same powers of arrest.

Sliz said that Dzialo and Alexander were so impressive during their interviews that "we decided they deserved an opportunity to fail."

Sliz said that each was required to lock his gun up in the station at the end of his shift, while older officers take their weapons home.

He said the change in the law may could affect smaller departments more than larger ones by reducing the size of the applicant pool.

The city has 16 applicants for three or four reserve officer slots. Most of them will probably be disqualified by background checks, various requirements, or the rigors of training, said Sliz.

"We'll be lucky to come up with a couple of candidates," he said.
 

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Gil";p="50985 said:
The bill's sponsor, Rep. Paul Casey, D-Winchester, proposed it as part of larger legislation to get weapons out of the hands of teens and young adults.

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Holy Snapping Arseholes!!!!!!!!!
:shock:
Anti-gun flavor in Police Recruitment legislation????????????????????? Only in Massachusetts! Now I REALLY have seen it all. Wow! this out of the mouth of a Democrat? Can you actually believe this statement?
:wl: :uc:

Jeezus,
I'm sorry but this rhetoric actually scares me a little. Now "young adults" are somehow not qualified to be police officers and need to have weapons "taken out of hand"
:wm:
 

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I just squeeked by....yea whats the big deal if they take the test or not? They already basically said they would not get hired at 19...so that just equals more test money for the state...

Who comes up with this sheite?
 

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To that end it's a bit scary...so what happens next, since you have to be 21 to own/buy a handgun or machine gun are they going to say that the military can't issue weapons to those under 21.

There has been a LONG standing exclusion for police when it comes to handguns. Now I don't disagree, maybe 18 is a bit "young" to be a cop and adding 3 years might help with all kinds of things...but lets really state what they are after...they figure at 21, yeah you can legally own a pistol in MA...but also they figure you are going to have military experience, some college, or have graduated college...so it's an end run around mandating a degree.

I actually think 21 is prolly a good universal standard for new police recruits and in reality it gives folks a decent recruit path.
1. Join the military and get some experience.
2. Go to college and get a degree.
When done look into a career in law enforcement.

Now all they have to do is increase the salary, make sure there is some incentive program for college grads and military...etc and so on.

An interesting idea would be to have a sort of police ROTC.
Get all your BI's done, get vetted department side, then get some money to-wards school. During your school time you would work administratively in the department. You can check the department out, they can check you out...when done to the academy you go, sponsored by the town you graduate, you have a job.

mpd61";p="50992 said:
Gil";p="50985 said:
The bill's sponsor, Rep. Paul Casey, D-Winchester, proposed it as part of larger legislation to get weapons out of the hands of teens and young adults.

.
Holy Snapping Arseholes!!!!!!!!!
:shock:
Anti-gun flavor in Police Recruitment legislation????????????????????? Only in Massachusetts! Now I REALLY have seen it all. Wow! this out of the mouth of a Democrat? Can you actually believe this statement?
:wl: :uc:

Jeezus,
I'm sorry but this rhetoric actually scares me a little. Now "young adults" are somehow not qualified to be police officers and need to have weapons "taken out of hand"
:wm:
 

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An interesting idea would be to have a sort of police ROTC.
Get all your BI's done, get vetted department side, then get some money to-wards school. During your school time you would work administratively in the department. You can check the department out, they can check you out...when done to the academy you go, sponsored by the town you graduate, you have a job.
Three words...."Massachusetts Police Corps"....didn't exactly work out. :roll:

Now my question is...does this apply to all police officers or just full time. I started working as a summer officer when I was only 19, and it was a great experience. This law would essentially kill the summer gigs for college students which provides great experience...especially when applying for a non-civil service job right out of college.
 

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Three words...."Massachusetts Police Corps"....didn't exactly work out. :roll:
Police Corps!? Oh my GOODNESS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
:sh:
 

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Now my question is...does this apply to all police officers or just full time. I started working as a summer officer when I was only 19, and it was a great experience. This law would essentially kill the summer gigs for college students which provides great experience...especially when applying for a non-civil service job right out of college.
Very good point about the summer special officers on the Cape. That is alot of good experience for someone wanting to get on the job, if they are off from college for the summer, able to work, and not 21 yet, they and the department get screwed. I know a few CJ students that have started out dispatching, decided to apply to Cape departments to work over the summer, and came back really squared away, alot more knowledgeable, and excellent candidates for a full-time job somewhere. There are pro and cons to everything. Maturity varies and it should be on a case by case basis in my opinion, not a knee jerk reaction and part of an anti-gun law.
 

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Chapter 467 of the Acts of 2004


AN ACT INCREASING THE MINIMUM AGE FOR APPOINTMENT AS A POLICE OFFICER.

Whereas, The deferred operation of this act would tend to defeat its purpose, which is to increase the minimum age for appointment of police officers, therefore it is hereby declared to be an emergency law, necessary for the immediate preservation of the public convenience.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:

SECTION 1. Section 10 of chapter 22C of the General Laws, as appearing in the 2002 Official Edition, is hereby amended by striking out, in line 26, the word "nineteenth" and inserting in place thereof the following figure:- twenty-first.

SECTION 2. Section 58 of chapter 31 of the General Laws, as so appearing, is hereby amended by striking out, in lines 18 and 19, the words "or police officer".

SECTION 3. The second paragraph of said section 58 of said chapter 31, as so appearing, is hereby amended by adding the following sentence:- No person shall be eligible to take an examination for orignal appointment to the position of police officer in any city or town if he will not have reached his twenty-first birthday on or before the final date for the filing of applications for such examination, as so stated.

SECTION 4. Section 64 of said chapter 31, as so appearing, is hereby amended by striking out, in line 14, the word "nineteenth" and inserting in the place thereof the following figure:- twenty-first.

SECTION 5. Notwithstanding any general or special law to the contrary, no person who has not reached his twenty-first birthday shall be appointed for the first time as a public safety officer in the division of law enforcement of the department of fisheries, wildlife and recreational vehicles or a campus police officer at a state or community college. The minimum age restriction for original appointment to said positions in effect before the effective date of this act shall apply to persons who have completed a competitive examination for said position before the effective date of this act.

SECTION 6. Section 10 of chapter 22C of the General Laws in effect before the effective date of this act shall apply to any person who has completed a competitive examination for appointment to the state police before the effective date of this act.

Approved January 5, 2005.
 

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AGE OF POLICE OFFICERS (H 4218) - Gov. Romney recently signed into law a bill raising from 19 to 21 the minimum age at which as person is eligible to be a local, state or MBTA police officer. Advocates of raising the age say that many 19-year-olds are barely out of high school and most do not have the maturity or life experience to assume the responsibilities of becoming a police officer. They also note that current state law is inconsistent because it prohibits citizens under 21 from having a handgun but allows 19 and 20-year-old police officers to do so. Opponents of the change say that many current police officers were 19 or 20 when they joined the force and are doing an excellent job. They also noted that 18-year-olds are allowed to enlist in the U.S. military and even 17-year-olds are permitted to enlist with parental consent.
 

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I applied to take the civil service police exam the day after Mitt signed the bill. I will be 21 17 days after the test. The results won't come in until I'm far past 21. I understand being more mature and all that, but honestly what's 17 days going to do to me? Nothing! So now I have to wait 2 years and a few months in order to take an exam. I just don't think that makes much sense.
 
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