Massachusetts Cop Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
MassCops Member
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
:?: :roll: Hello two of my partners and I are going to Florida for an interview with the Collier County Sheriff's dept. Has any one had any experience with the hiring process in Florida. i am wondering how the interview poly and psycholigical exam work or any info from any one who's gone through the process.
 

·
Subscribing Member
Joined
·
1,167 Posts
BigApe,

Prior to getting a reserve appointment here in Massachusetts, I began the process with Florida Highway Patrol last year. I didn't complete the process however, by my own choice. Declined part way through. What I can tell you, is that the physical is pretty easy. I was overweight and out of shape at the time (no longer thank you), and I had a pretty easy time with the physical. I even screwed up one part, and had to re-do it, and still had time left over.
Why Collier? I know with FHP, they were paying a considerable higher amount, due to the higher cost of living.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
For a non-certified officer: You must take a written test, equivalent to the Test of Adult Basic Education (TABE) which most Ma. vocational schools can offer. If you do that, you will get an idea of how you will do on the Fla. exam. Until recently, the TABE was accepted, but no more. Now you must actually take the exam in Florida.

The you must be cleared on a fingerprint and crim history check by Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) and that will allow you to enroll in a police academy. Once you graduate, you take the state licensing exam. If you pass, you are then certified. Now you can go looking for a job. Departments administer a standard PAT, which consists of running, low crawling, jumping three obstacles, dragging a dummy, and dry-firing a revolver 6 times. Recently deceased people have been known to pass the test. You can literally walk it in the times given.

Most agencies do backgrounds, psychs, and polygraphs. Only a few of the smallest do not do that.

Once hired, you enter the FTO program. That is the toughest part. In two of the larger jurisdictions where I work, they drop over half of their new-hires during field training.

A few agencies will hire you and then send you to an academy, but that is unusual, FHP is the only state agency to do that.

If you are an academy grad, or an ex-MP type, log in to Google, and enter "Police Applicant Screening System" and you will find a page that will tell you how to go about getting your certification in just 2 weeks of training.

No unions, lots of "at will" employment, but the pay is good, and getting better, and the pension system is unbelievable. Vested in 6 years! And you can retire at 20, then stay for another 5 years and walk off with an extra lump sum of up to 350 grand. And the housing costs are about half of what I paid in Mass.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
874 Posts
Don't know too much about the process, but we just had a Lieutenant leave and is now almost half way done with the FHP academy. He passed the phys, psych, and even the stupid poly without problems. I hear from him last week and he's loving it there.
 

·
Subscribing Member
Joined
·
3,231 Posts
If your certified, its not that difficult of a process. Sheriffs have recently been allowed form unions and most South Florida PD's are union also. I went through the process being Certified from Mass and didn't have any problems. FTO is the biggest problem for most people as was pointed out in another post. Many won't make it through.

FHP is NOT the way to go if you move to Florida, in my (and many others) humble opinion. If you need any further info - PM me and I'll be glad to help.

Stay safe!!!
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
8,417 Posts
Good Luck Bigape! :thumbup:

Florida boys & girls, can you elaborate a bit about the FTO aspect and why you think there is such an inordinate number of trainee dropouts?
Thanks!! KK
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
IMHO, the main issue with FTO failures is this: The FTO process is the first time the agency really tries to do any weeeding out. I know that sounds odd, considering the testing that precedes it, but the testing is not too rigorous. And the FTO process is extremely subjective. If the FTO doesn't get along with you, you MAY have an opportunity to try one other, but after that, you are gone.

The FTO process I went thru requires you to do what you are told. For example, I was handed a sheet of blank paper one day, and told to draw the boundaries of the jurisdiction, and the beat boundaries throughout the city. If I had performed it incorrectly, I would have been a failure for that week, and terminated.

Finally, I think the system of hiring trained personnel means that a lot of people come on the job with absolutely no understanding of the realities. They suffer severe culture shock, and quit. The training method here is totally non-military, a very collegiate, campus style. First time someone asks "What the f*** you stopping me for, motherf*****" and the new recruit goes into freeze mode. Or snaps and does a number on the motorist.

But thats just my take on it.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
8,417 Posts
Finally, I think the system of hiring trained personnel means that a lot of people come on the job with absolutely no understanding of the realities. They suffer severe culture shock, and quit. The training method here is totally non-military, a very collegiate, campus style. First time someone asks "What the f*** you stopping me for, motherf*****" and the new recruit goes into freeze mode. Or snaps and does a number on the motorist....
You know bdqadvisor I've heard that about other areas of the country. My buddy got a job on the Scottsdale AZ PD.
He said policing out there is totally different that on the east coast. He told me one distinct difference was they have to "sell" the ticket out west and if the driver argues or questions it, they continue the discussion reasonably until "all parties are satisfied or understand clearly the infraction", back east, well you know... :wink: :L:
 

·
Subscribing Member
Joined
·
1,169 Posts
The FTO process is pretty strict, but it has to be. Law enforcement here is a little bit different than good ole' Massachusetts. Having worked in both areas I feel competent in expressing an opinion on the matter.
The testing process is pretty generic. However field training is most important because of the issues the recruits face. Testing one's ability to perform under pressure or in the heat of battle is paramount to a successful training. But that doesn't necessarily mean that the PD is going to wash someone out right away. Plenty of opportunities are provided for improvement. Obviously if the recruit isn't "getting it" then it is time to go. In my department recruits are in field training for a total of 10-11 weeks; 5 weeks with one FTO, 4 weeks with another FTO, then one or two weeks in "shadow" (the recruit is in their own cruiser and the FTO follows/assists them on their calls/car stops, etc.). A majority do make it through the process, only a few drop out or are terminated.
Frankly, I would rather see some idiot not make it than have to "grin and bear it" as most do in the silly circus environment of Massachusetts. Because there you own them.
It's not a bad gig around here; lots to do, no layoffs, and most importantly no snow!
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top