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Anyone know of a good leather double cuff case? Iam looking for one in high gloss. I want one where I wont end up drawing both sets of cuffs when I only need one. Any ideas?
Thanks
 

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Bearcat said:
Anyone know of a good leather double cuff case? Iam looking for one in high gloss. I want one where I wont end up drawing both sets of cuffs when I only need one. Any ideas?
Thanks
I've enver seen one in High gloss, and in the past I had actualy spent some time looking, as that was standard for the last Sec. Comp. I worked for. Good Luck
 

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CBayer222 said:
I've enver seen one in High gloss, and in the past I had actualy spent some time looking, as that was standard for the last Sec. Comp. I worked for. Good Luck
Why would you need a double cuff pouch for a Security Company?
 

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A security guard is basically a private citizen, however they can still make "arrests" for certain types of crimes committed in their presence. This is considered a "citizens arrest".

Also, from my days in retail security/loss prevention, most states allow for use of force in detaining persons committing certain crimes such as larceny.

The following is from RI Law, however I am believe a similar statue exists in Mass.

"(e) In detaining a person whom the merchant has reasonable grounds to believe is committing the crime of shoplifting, the merchant may use a reasonable amount of non-deadly force when and only when that force is necessary to protect himself or herself, or to prevent the escape of the person being detained or the loss of his or her property."

So there are certain cases where handcuffs can be legally used by security, however they are limited greatly compared to those situations an LEO may use them in.
 

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sabreRED said:
A security guard is basically a private citizen, however they can still make "arrests" for certain types of crimes committed in their presence. This is considered a "citizens arrest".

Also, from my days in retail security/loss prevention, most states allow for use of force in detaining persons committing certain crimes such as larceny.

The following is from RI Law, however I am believe a similar statue exists in Mass.

"(e) In detaining a person whom the merchant has reasonable grounds to believe is committing the crime of shoplifting, the merchant may use a reasonable amount of non-deadly force when and only when that force is necessary to protect himself or herself, or to prevent the escape of the person being detained or the loss of his or her property."

So there are certain cases where handcuffs can be legally used by security, however they are limited greatly compared to those situations an LEO may use them in.
Basically the same thing in MA its called "Mercants Privlage" (sp?)...so sorry tango, you got served.
 

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CBayer222 said:
Basically the same thing in MA its called "Mercants Privlage" (sp?)...so sorry tango, you got served.
Back at you buddy. Security that works as a detective for a store has the right to detain a person. A security officer that doesn't work in that field does not have the authority to detain a person unless it is a Felony.
 

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tango2 said:
Back at you buddy. Security that works as a detective for a store has the right to detain a person. A security officer that doesn't work in that field does not have the authority to detain a person unless it is a Felony.
ok...so then you do know why some security would need a cuff case
 

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CBayer222 said:
ok...so then you do know why some security would need a cuff case
Yes I do. I worked in the police field for 13 years and I seen a lot of security gaurds that should not have handcuffs. Believe me they should have never been in Uniform. But on the other hand there are some companies out there that are very respectible. But as we all know there are a lot of wackers.
 

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tango2 said:
Yes I do. I worked in the police field for 13 years and I seen a lot of security gaurds that should not have handcuffs. Believe me they should have never been in Uniform. But on the other hand there are some companies out there that are very respectible. But as we all know there are a lot of wackers.
Agreed
 

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For those of you that don't know what your talking about, namely sabreRED, There is no such thing as a citizen's arrest for a misdemeanor in Massachusetts. (Common Law)

As for Merchants Priviledge (Common Law) good luck with that one too.

Any legitimate business makes sure their employees are sworn in as special police officers before they allow them to make arrests. To rely on the common law (where nothing is written) is a disaster waiting to happen if you plan on going around arresting people.
 

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sabreRED-"...The following is from RI Law, however I am believe a similar statue exists in Mass. "

In Mass it's called A&B, Kidnapping.

Oh, don't tell me your a constable...:alcoholi:
 

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no$.10 said:
sabreRED-"...The following is from RI Law, however I am believe a similar statue exists in Mass. "

In Mass it's called A&B, Kidnapping.

Oh, don't tell me your a constable...:alcoholi:
The Dude is a Security Gaurd for a hospital.
 

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tango2 said:
Security that works as a detective for a store has the right to detain a person.
94c said:
Any legitimate business makes sure their employees are sworn in as special police officers before they allow them to make arrests.
I thought that store security guards/detectives/loss prevention are not allowed to touch anyone. I've never heard of any of them being sworn in as specials. I was under the impression that all they can do is order the suspect back into the store and pray that they stay until the police arrive; the suspect has to go with them willingly because the store security can't use any force. Other than that, they're out of luck and have to let the suspect go. Right? :s
 

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Officer Dunngeon said:
I thought that store security guards/detectives/loss prevention are not allowed to touch anyone. I've never heard of any of them being sworn in as specials. I was under the impression that all they can do is order the suspect back into the store and pray that they stay until the police arrive; the suspect has to go with them willingly because the store security can't use any force. Other than that, they're out of luck and have to let the suspect go. Right? :s
Im looking into it. The laws are always changing. There is a limit or was a limit for loss Prevention Officers. At one time they could hold somebody. But Security Gaurds running around with handcuffs and telling people that they are under arrest thats a wacker and a law suite waiting to happen. Massachusetts should have a test for Security Gaurds like in other states. There are some companies out there that have normal people working for them.
 

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Officer Dunngeon said:
I thought that store security guards/detectives/loss prevention are not allowed to touch anyone. I've never heard of any of them being sworn in as specials. I was under the impression that all they can do is order the suspect back into the store and pray that they stay until the police arrive; the suspect has to go with them willingly because the store security can't use any force. Other than that, they're out of luck and have to let the suspect go. Right? :s
I know that Kmart at the old Assembly Square Mall in Somerville used to swear their LP employees in as specials, saved the PD a lot of hassle, all they had to do was the transport and booking, LP did the rest right at their station.
 

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When I was 13, I was in the CVS in Copley with a friend of mine. She apparently swiped something because as soon as we left the store, a couple of guys came out, grabbed her by either arm and escorted her back into the store (I found out later she stole a bottle of nail polish). I worked at Stop & Shop when I was 15 and I remember having to stand by as a witness a couple of times when the store security would process a female shoplifter in their office so she couldn't later say they tried anything funny with her. I personally saw them dragging people up to their office many a time, it was a daily occurence.

I know a guy that works loss prevention now for TJ Maxx and he says everything has changed. He is NOT allowed to touch anyone. He can follow them out of the store and approach them, but if they act especially agitated he has to back off for his own safety - and if they take off with the merchandise, he can only offer information to the local police without taking any further action on his own until they arrive.

I don't know if this type of loss prevention policy applies to all retailers in the state or not. I would tend to think most have adopted it as a general rule simply because of lawsuits from these types of security personnel not being sworn officials; any number of legal messes could result from these people utilizing any kind of physical force (which, of course, includes detaining a suspect). In all honesty, those people make about $12 an hour doing that kind of work anyway - why the hell would they want to jeopardize their well-being for that kind of money?
 
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