Massachusetts Cop Forum banner

1 - 20 of 53 Posts

·
Subscribing Member
Joined
·
1,209 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Cop admits beating mother, 73: Peabody officer turns himself in after assault leaves woman in coma
By Julie Manganis and Andrew Hickey
Staff writers


PEABODY — A Peabody police officer has admitted beating his elderly mother for months, culminating with a Thanksgiving Day assault that left her in a coma.

George Sideris, 33, turned himself in at the Peabody police station yesterday. He pleaded not guilty in Peabody District Court to charges of assault and battery on a person over 60 causing serious injury.

Sideris, a full-time police officer for four years, has been suspended without pay and was forced to turn over his gun and badge, according to police.

Melpomeni Sideris, 73, remained in a coma in the intensive care unit of Salem Hospital last night, a spokeswoman said. George Sideris was placed on a suicide watch at Middleton Jail.

News of the arrest stunned neighbors on Ellsworth Road, where Sideris lives with his mother just up the street from the police station.

Next-door neighbor Jack Bancroft said Sideris and his mother gardened together in the summer and often came to his door bearing vegetables. Bancroft said they often spoke to each other in Greek and he never heard them fighting.

"She speaks the world of her 'Georgie,'" Bancroft said. "They lived together. They loved each other."

In his statement to police, Sideris said he started abusing his mother in March when he kicked and slapped her and sent her to the hospital.

He assaulted her again within the last couple of weeks. Once he punched her in the forehead and watched as it swelled. Earlier this week, he slapped her in the face and hit her back with the side of his fist.

On Thanksgiving Day, Sideris hit his mother in the back and on the right shoulder. This time, she lay down and was unresponsive when he asked questions. When her breathing and circulation seemed shallow, Sideris told police he called 911.

Handcuffed with a nylon jacket covering his hands, Sideris appeared in court just after 3 p.m. yesterday. Defense lawyer James Rennick could be heard telling him not to say anything as he entered the courtroom.

Rennick had asked a court psychologist to meet with his client before the court appearance. Dr. Randall Dwyer raised concerns about Sideris's emotional stability, and Rennick requested his client be kept under observation. Judge Santo Ruma ordered that Sideris be kept under close watch for emotional disturbance or suicidal behavior.

After yesterday's hearing, Sideris was brought downstairs to a holding cell. A sheriff's department van arrived to take him to jail. But instead he was taken by ambulance to Lahey Clinic in Peabody after he complained of chest pains. He was then taken directly to jail from the hospital, police said.

Several of Sideris's relatives attended yesterday's hearing but declined comment.

But Sideris' neighbors said they were puzzled by how a mother-son relationship that appeared loving on the surface could erupt into violence.

Christine and Neil Gray both shook their heads, saying the alleged abuse was "hard to believe."

"I thought he was living with her to take care of her," Neil Gray said. "Never did she give any indication of anything like this."

"They are both very friendly," Christine Gray said. "I'm shocked. He seemed like a very, very nice guy. This is all so sad."

Bancroft, the other neighbor, said Melpomeni Sideris would give him her Feta cheese because she was watching her cholesterol.

"I don't believe this, I really don't," Bancroft said. "I refuse to believe this."

The Grays and Bancroft said having a police officer living in the neighborhood was a huge selling point when they bought their homes.

Yesterday, however, police officers were camped out in the driveway of the vacant Sideris house. They said they were "securing the scene," but wouldn't provide more details.

Within the police department, Sideris was considered a nice guy and model officer, Peabody Police Lt. Dennis Bonaiuto said. Several Peabody police officers showed up at the courthouse yesterday.

"He was very well-liked within and about the department," Bonaiuto said.

Sideris' arrest has caused "a great deal of sadness and a great deal of surprise" to his fellow officers, Bonaiuto said.

Bonaiuto said it doesn't appear that George Sideris has been arrested in the past or has been disciplined within the police department.

"I would be extremely surprised to learn anything like that," he said.

Melpomeni Sideris immigrated to Peabody from Greece with her husband about 35 or 40 years ago, according to her second cousin, Minas Dakos, who is well-known as a member of the city's License Commission and as a bail commissioner. Dakos accompanied Sideris to the police station yesterday and was also in court.

Dakos said that at some point after their only son was born, her husband abandoned his young family and returned to Greece.

Melpomeni Sideris raised her son on her own and bought the house on Ellsworth Road, Dakos said.

Dakos said George Sideris went to Salem State College before getting on the police force. Before joining the force full time in October 2000, Sideris was a dispatcher for almost two years.

The investigation has been taken over by State Police assigned to the district attorney's office. Sideris will be held without bail at least through Tuesday, when a judge will determine whether he poses a danger if released.

:no: :no:
 

·
Subscribing Member
Joined
·
1,209 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I dont know, this was in todays issue of the Salem Evening News.

I'm confused, did the past incidents just come to light during the big one a few days ago?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
This is distrubing..I KNOW HIM! I've been out for drinks with him with Peabody cops I know. He always "seemed" very nice and low key. But I always had a gut feeling he was a little strange..like too nice... This just makes you want to throw up. What a Sick Bastard! Who beats up their own mother?!?.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
What could make someone so angry that he would throw away his career (let alone beat his elderly mother into a coma)? Especially when you consider how competitive it is to become a police officer in Massachusetts.

With this being a domestic violence issue, its more than likely Sideris will be made an example of and will soon be residing in a House of Correction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Family, friends 'dumbfounded' by beating of police officer's mother
By Jamie Jamieson
Staff writer


PEABODY — Friends and family of Melpomeni Sideris spent a watchful weekend praying the 73-year-old woman would recover from injuries inflicted by her son, George Sideris. The 33-year-old Peabody police officer remained under suicide watch at Middleton Jail, after being arrested Friday and charged with assaulting his mother.

Melpomeni Sideris remained in a coma at Salem Hospital last night.

At St. Vasilios Greek Orthodox Church in Peabody, the Rev. Andrew Demotses said parishioners who knew Sideris and her son, George, were "dumbfounded" by the news.

"It seemed so entirely out of character for him and entirely implausible that there would be any problem between George and his mother," Demotses said. "It was like a bolt of lightning really, out of the blue."

On Friday, the day after the Thanksgiving Day attack, Demotses met George Sideris and Minas Dakos, a cousin who is close to both family members, at Salem Hospital. The three stood next to Melpomeni's bed and said a prayer. Then Demotses asked the younger Sideris what happened.

"He said, 'I can't lie to you, this is what happened,'" Dakos said. "And we both said, 'You know what you have to do now.'"

Dakos accompanied George Sideris to Peabody police headquarters, where he made a statement admitting he had been beating his mother since last March.

His abuse had sent her to the hospital before. But the most damaging beating came Thanksgiving Day, when Sideris told police he hit his mother on the back and on the right shoulder and she fell to the ground. When his mother was unresponsive to his questions, and her breathing became shallow, the police officer of the last four years called 911.

Friends close to the Sideris family say they saw no evidence the son, whom his mother called "Georgie," would be prone to such violence.

Demotses described George Sideris as a "quiet, gentle, extremely respectful young man" who had always wanted to be a police officer.

"I remember writing a letter of recommendation for him; I did it happily," he said. Police officers who worked with him "are as shocked as the rest of us," he said.

"Some people are grieving. Other people are still trying to digest what has happened and trying to come to terms with it," Demotses said.

Parishioners at Demotses' church were similarly shocked by the news, some learning about the assault for the first time at Sunday morning services. As he walked out of church yesterday morning, Nick Korkaris said he and his wife had known the Sideris family of Ellsworth Road for 35 years.

"We know them as a very good family, and we were surprised when we heard this happened," he said.

Korkaris was one of only a few friends to visit Sideris in the hospital over the weekend. He said he was doing his best to remain optimistic.

"She didn't look too good," he said, "but we hope for the best."

George Sideris is Melpomeni's only son. She raised him on her own after her husband abandoned the family and returned to Greece.

While those who know the family expressed sympathy for George, as well as his mother, those who do not were less charitable in their opinions.

"He deserves everything he's going to get," said George Couris, a retired Peabody police officer and owner of the Barber Shoppe on Foster Street in Peabody Square. Police officers must take a psychological test when they are hired, Couris said.

"I can't imagine it happening, and to a mother! It's really, really, really bad," he said.

State Rep. Joyce Spiliotis said the incident was the talk of the Football Hall of Fame dinner Friday night. "It's awful these things happen on holidays," she said. "I worked in the courts and I did see it would happen. Many times after the holidays we would be so busy, and it would be a lot of family disputes. It's just so sad."

Sideris will be remain in jail at least until Tuesday, when a hearing will be held to determine whether he poses a danger if released on bail.
______________________________________________________________

This is just craziness! I can't even fathom how people feel bad for him. He's been beating her up since March. And this crap about him being insane makes me laugh. He's been a normal police officer functioning just fine on a daily basis but a closet psycho on the side. He NEEDS to be made an example out of. This poor women might die.. and if that happens.. I'd like to see nothing but Murder one. What a sin!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
":He NEEDS to be made an example out of."

Why does he need to made an example of, because he's a police officer or because he assaulted his own mother? I have no pity for him because he beat on a defenseless person, and it was his own mother. I also hope he gets what he deserves through the legal system, not because he was/is a cop but because he is a coward who pummeled his own mother.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
He needs to be made an example of because he swore to protect & serve his community. While he was doing so (and making domestic violence arrests himself) he was beating an elderly woman. He had no plans to own up to what he did until he was convinced to do so by others.This entire situation is a black eye to all of us who hold the public's trust.
 

·
Thread Killa
Joined
·
6,056 Posts
I would assert that police are and should be held to a higher standard. When you are charged with protecting and serving the public as LE is, when you violate those laws that you were sworn to uphold, it's particularly devastating to the public trust.

As well the "standard" runs both way, any homicide is "bad" but those of a LEO are particularly heinous and should be held to a higher standard of punishment.

":He NEEDS to be made an example out of."

Why does he need to made an example of, because he's a police officer or because he assaulted his own mother? I have no pity for him because he beat on a defenseless person, and it was his own mother. I also hope he gets what he deserves through the legal system, not because he was/is a cop but because he is a coward who pummeled his own mother.
 

·
Subscribing Member
Joined
·
944 Posts
It's too bad he had to put his mother in a Coma to make something as heinous as this stop. I wonder how much longer it would have lasted. I hope there weren't any visits from the police to their home before for fighting or anything like that. Because if there was and nothing was done then you gotta start looking at the rest of the dept. Which would kinda suck. I'm not sayin but i'm just sayin.


Scott :pc:
 
G

·
Whatever the outcome, this guys badges and guns are gone forever. If she doesn't make it, he could get a lot of time, but I don't think they can get him on murder one due to the fact that premeditation will be hard to prove here. I don't think that even second degree murder will apply because of lack of specific intent. It most likely will be manslaughter because he created a high risk of death but that was not the specific intent.

Watch, he will eventually enter a plea of guilty with a plea bargain to a lesser charge.
 

·
Czar of Cyncism and Satire
Joined
·
2,070 Posts
He's a scumbag plain & simple. I don't know him & I never care to meet him ever in the future. I wouldn't waste my time even spitting on him. Anybody, ANYBODY who beats the woman who gave them birth deserves everything the court system can throw at them, and then some.

I don't care if he has 1 million excuses for his behavior, you just shouldn't do it, period. It's maybe acceptable to hit your mother when you are 3 years old and in the middle of a temper tantrum. He's doing it 30 years later, so that makes him a scumbag, deserving of Cedar Junction. Those inmates will teach poor Mr. Sideris (ex-cop and future ex-con) what's it's like to be on the recieving end of a beating.

My mother and father are in the same age bracket & you've got to cherish your parents at this age. They may not be around much longer so each & every day with them is special. Besides, if I ever raised a hand at them, my old man would still give me the smack-down. This guy is a loser, pretending to be a cop. A real cop would never do such a thing. HC
 

·
Subscribing Member
Joined
·
383 Posts
Sgt.berniedo @ 29 Nov 2004 20:55 said:
but I don't think they can get him on murder one due to the fact that premeditation will be hard to prove here. I don't think that even second degree murder will apply because of lack of specific intent.
Would the felony murder rule apply here? A&B on an elderly person is a felony, I believe. I am no lawyer, just pondering.
 

·
Subscribing Member
Joined
·
1,209 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Dangerousness hearing for Peabody cop in elder abuse case postponed
By Jill Harmacinski and Julie Manganis
Staff writers


PEABODY — The court hearing to determine whether a Peabody police officer poses a danger if he's released on bail has been postponed until Thursday.

Patrolman George Sideris, who admitted to police last week that he beat his 73-year-old mother, was scheduled to appear today in Peabody District Court for a so-called "dangerousness" hearing.

But lawyers for Sideris asked that the hearing be postponed, a request granted late yesterday afternoon by a Peabody District Court judge. The defense is not required to explain why it wants a postponement. Sideris has hired a new lawyer, Edward O'Reilly.

Sideris, 33, has pleaded not guilty to charges of assault and battery on a person over 60. But according to police, he admitted to beating his mother for months, culminating with a Thanksgiving Day assault that left her in a coma. The two lived together on Ellsworth Road.

Melpomeni Sideris remained in serious condition in the intensive care unit at Salem Hospital last night. Sideris is in Middleton Jail under a suicide watch.

More details about what went on in the Sideris household over the past six months could emerge from Thursday's hearing. A judge will be asked to determine whether he poses a danger to himself or others, including his mother. The judge must decide if there are any conditions, such as electronic monitoring or close probation supervision, that could protect others, or if Sideris is simply too dangerous to release.

The District Attorney's office has assigned a prosecutor to the case, Karen Hopwood, who until recently was in charge of all domestic violence prosecutions in Lynn District Court.

Peabody Police Chief Robert Champagne said Sideris has never been disciplined by the department or had a complaint filed by a civilian in Sideris' four years with the department. Champagne described Sideris as "mild-mannered and soft spoken."

"We're shocked on many levels," Champagne said. "It's a horrendous day when you have to arrest one of your own on these kind of charges. Our prayers, of course, are with his mother."

Neighbors said the facts of the case don't match the doting mother and caring son they thought they knew. But experts say it isn't easy to spot elder abuse. The vast majority of elder abuse comes at the hands of relatives and in the confines of the family home, they say.

"The victim and abuser often depend on one another in some way," said Sara Aravanis, director of the National Center on Elder Abuse in Washington, D.C.

The number of abuse cases reported to Elder Services of the North Shore has climbed about 5 percent every year for the past two decades, said Joe Wamness, protective services supervisor for the agency that serves Peabody, Danvers, Salem, Middleton and Marblehead.

The agency has four social workers dedicated to cases of elder abuse and neglect. At any one time they are dealing with about 60 families, Wamness said. Caseworkers can help set up medical and living assistance for the abused, help them seek restraining orders and set up supervised visits.

Wamness attributes the rising caseload to increased awareness of the problem, not an actual rise in abuse.

Medical professionals, police and firefighters are obligated by law to report suspected abuse. But neighbors and friends shouldn't hesitate to report their suspicions to police, experts say. The person reporting their suspicions can remain anonymous.

But there is little authorities can do without the cooperation of the victim, who is often hesitant to turn in their abuser, Wamness said.

"It's a family member they care about," said Assistant District Attorney Kathe Tuttman, who heads the Essex County family crime and sexual assault unit. "A person may actually love the individual that's abusing them and it's hard for them to feel they can follow through with law enforcement."

Staff reporter Michael Puffer contributed to this story.
 
G

·
No to that CampusOfficer that would be during the commission of a felony like robbery; as this was a heat of passion assault. If she does not recover, I agree the bastard should fry, but that probably won't happen.
Felony murder: committed a homicide in commission of a felony. Usu. applies only to inherently dangerous felonies (e.g. arson, rape, robbery, burglary … sometimes larceny, kidnapping, mayhem and sodomy.) -http://www.huskylaw.net/StudyGuides/hardisty_crimlaw_2000.doc
 

·
Thread Killa
Joined
·
6,056 Posts
I would imagine that he would maybe be safer IN custody and isolation.

Dangerousness hearing for Peabody cop in elder abuse case postponed
By Jill Harmacinski and Julie Manganis
Staff writers

PEABODY - The court hearing to determine whether a Peabody police officer poses a danger if he's released on bail has been postponed until Thursday.

Patrolman George Sideris, who admitted to police last week that he beat his 73-year-old mother, was scheduled to appear today in Peabody District Court for a so-called "dangerousness" hearing.

But lawyers for Sideris asked that the hearing be postponed, a request granted late yesterday afternoon by a Peabody District Court judge. The defense is not required to explain why it wants a postponement. Sideris has hired a new lawyer, Edward O'Reilly.

Sideris, 33, has pleaded not guilty to charges of assault and battery on a person over 60. But according to police, he admitted to beating his mother for months, culminating with a Thanksgiving Day assault that left her in a coma. The two lived together on Ellsworth Road.

Melpomeni Sideris remained in serious condition in the intensive care unit at Salem Hospital last night. Sideris is in Middleton Jail under a suicide watch.

More details about what went on in the Sideris household over the past six months could emerge from Thursday's hearing. A judge will be asked to determine whether he poses a danger to himself or others, including his mother. The judge must decide if there are any conditions, such as electronic monitoring or close probation supervision, that could protect others, or if Sideris is simply too dangerous to release.

The District Attorney's office has assigned a prosecutor to the case, Karen Hopwood, who until recently was in charge of all domestic violence prosecutions in Lynn District Court.

Peabody Police Chief Robert Champagne said Sideris has never been disciplined by the department or had a complaint filed by a civilian in Sideris' four years with the department. Champagne described Sideris as "mild-mannered and soft spoken."

"We're shocked on many levels," Champagne said. "It's a horrendous day when you have to arrest one of your own on these kind of charges. Our prayers, of course, are with his mother."

Neighbors said the facts of the case don't match the doting mother and caring son they thought they knew. But experts say it isn't easy to spot elder abuse. The vast majority of elder abuse comes at the hands of relatives and in the confines of the family home, they say.

"The victim and abuser often depend on one another in some way," said Sara Aravanis, director of the National Center on Elder Abuse in Washington, D.C.

The number of abuse cases reported to Elder Services of the North Shore has climbed about 5 percent every year for the past two decades, said Joe Wamness, protective services supervisor for the agency that serves Peabody, Danvers, Salem, Middleton and Marblehead.

The agency has four social workers dedicated to cases of elder abuse and neglect. At any one time they are dealing with about 60 families, Wamness said. Caseworkers can help set up medical and living assistance for the abused, help them seek restraining orders and set up supervised visits.

Wamness attributes the rising caseload to increased awareness of the problem, not an actual rise in abuse.

Medical professionals, police and firefighters are obligated by law to report suspected abuse. But neighbors and friends shouldn't hesitate to report their suspicions to police, experts say. The person reporting their suspicions can remain anonymous.

But there is little authorities can do without the cooperation of the victim, who is often hesitant to turn in their abuser, Wamness said.

"It's a family member they care about," said Assistant District Attorney Kathe Tuttman, who heads the Essex County family crime and sexual assault unit. "A person may actually love the individual that's abusing them and it's hard for them to feel they can follow through with law enforcement."

Staff reporter Michael Puffer contributed to this story.
 

·
Founder of MassCops
Joined
·
6,401 Posts
Psychiatric tests OK'd for accused Peabody police officer

Psychiatric tests OK'd for accused Peabody police officer
By John Ellement, Globe Staff | December 3, 2004

PEABODY -- A dangerousness hearing for a Peabody police officer accused of beating his 73-year-old mother Thanksgiving Day was postponed yesterday, and a judge agreed that George Sideris could undergo private psychiatric tests before he returns to court Dec. 23.

Sideris, 33, is accused of hitting his disabled mother, Melpomeni Sideris, in the back and right shoulder at their Ellsworth Road home, according to court records. Found unconscious by rescue personnel after Sideris called 911, the woman was rushed to Salem Hospital in a coma. Her condition has since improved.

Peabody District Court Judge Santo J. Ruma delayed the hearing at the request of defense lawyer Edward J. O'Reilly and overruled the objections of prosecutors to allow Sideris to be evaluated by a private psychiatrist while he is held without bail at the Essex County Jail in Middleton. Sideris is under suicide watch at the jail, said Paul Fleming, spokesman for Sheriff Frank G. Cousins Jr.

According to court records, the Thanksgiving Day attack was the latest in a series of violent acts Sideris committed against his mother. Last March, Sideris told police in a written statement, he slapped and kicked his mother, injuring her to the point where she had to be hospitalized. The name of the hospital where Melpomeni Sideris was treated was not disclosed in court records.

If any of the medical personnel who treated the woman suspected that she was a victim of abuse, no one reported it to the state's Executive Office of Elder Affairs, as required under the state's mandatory abuse reporting law, said Je'Lesia M. Jones, spokeswoman for the agency.

''Nobody reported anything to us and, obviously, we can't know about these situations unless someone lets us know," Jones said. ''Mandated reporters should have contacted us."

Jones said her agency was alerted after Sideris's arrest last week and it is monitoring the case.

Steven O'Connell, spokesman for Essex District Attorney Jonathan Blodgett, said prosecutors were not alerted to the March incident and had no contact with the Sideris family before last week.

Sideris also confessed to punching his mother in the forehead Nov. 19. He also admitted slapping his mother in the face and punching her in the back before Thanksgiving Day.

In court yesterday, Sideris appeared to be in ''kind of a fog" during his brief appearance, said Manuel J. Costa, who was among 11 Peabody police officers standing in the rear of the courtroom. Costa described Sideris as a ''caring" and ''even-keeled" officer who seemed to be devoted to his mother.

John Ellement can be reached at [email protected].

© Copyright 2004 Globe Newspaper Company.
http://www.boston.com/news/local/ma...tests_okd_for_accused_peabody_police_officer/
 
1 - 20 of 53 Posts
Top