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Any officers here have to cope with any of this nonsense?
"...demented and incorrigible troublemakers, throwing feces, ripping toilets off walls, and trying to attack officers..."
I love the euphemisms they use for these little tit-turds. Incorrigible troublemakers .
Ignorant, simpleminded assholes is more like it.

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In the week since the Department of Correction was forced to close its ``supermax'' unit for the most dangerous Walpole cons, the dislocated inmates have wreaked havoc in the prison system, stealing drugs, stabbing one another, and causing thousands of dollars in damage.

On Thursday, three Walpole inmates got into into a brawl with a sharpened piece of plexiglass inside their penitentiary, MCI-Cedar Junction. They landed in the prison infirmary with stab wounds, correction officials said.

The fight came a week after the Herald reported the doors at Walpole's Disciplinary Disorders Unit, which houses the state's most dangerous cons, were snapping open and allowing inmates to escape. In one incident, a con got out of his cell, smashed windows and began handing razors to other inmates.

The day the front-page story ran, the DOC shut down the unit and moved its felonious occupants to other areas of Cedar Junction or to different Bay State prisons.

``We have a vendor who is working with us to chase the problem to determine what happened,'' DOC spokeswoman Kelly Nantel said yesterday.

In the days since the supermax prisoners were moved, the shuffled inmates have lived up to their reputations as demented and incorrigible troublemakers, throwing feces, ripping toilets off walls, and trying to attack officers, several correction officers said.

``It's a much less secure environment for the worst guys we have,'' said one Walpole correction officer who asked to not be named.

The problems have caused several thousand dollars in damage, Nantel said, adding, ``Things have settled down since those first few days.''

As things ``settle down'' at the Walpole facility, the Massachusetts Correction Officers Federated Association has accused DOC officials of creating a dangerous environment for officers and inmates at MCI-Concord. On Monday, several prisoners there were able to steal more than 100 powerful painkillers from a nurses station, said Steve Kenneway, the union's president.

``MCI-Concord continues to be a symbol of the DOC's negligence and failure to maintain safety in the prisons across the commonwealth,'' Kenneway said. ``Severe understaffing has led to widespread chaos.''
 

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Leslie Walker, executive director of Massachusetts Correctional Legal Services, was not asked to participate in Governor Mitt Romney’s 15-member Commission on Corrections Reform, although her group has been a loud and consistent voice for systemic change. The state legislature’s Joint Committee on Public Safety — whose co-chair, Senator Jarrett Barrios, also sits on the commission — did want Walker’s advice, however, and got it at a hearing this Tuesday. Following her testimony, the Phoenix interviewed Walker to get her thoughts on what’s needed to reform the Massachusetts Department of Correction (DOC).

Q: What would you gain by proper classification?

A: You would save a lot of money if you properly classified prisoners. If the Department of Correction assigned the prisoners based on the objective assessment, they would have to turn some of the medium- and maximum-security beds into minimum security. You don’t have to build new minimum-security prisons — you can go from a higher-level security to a lower level just by opening the doors. It lets you increase your prisoner-to-guard ratio, so you need fewer guards. You can use that money you save on guards for classes and substance-abuse programs and other things that minimum-security prisoners can do. Then you have prisoners who are ready to go back out when it’s time, so you reduce recidivism.

I feel very strongly that if the Department of Correction was ordered to follow its own classification system, we would lay off guards. They have not laid off one guard, even when they closed down three facilities. Also, they are rich with sergeants and other middle management. You’ve got to lay people off.

This is a interview with inmate advocate Attorney Leslie Walker.
 

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You gotta love those non-correctional experienced folks that run the Corrections system. Putting these freakin' idiots in charge of DOC was a HUGE mistake...a disgusting mistake and not only a risk to CO's but general public safety as well. Just aweful.
 
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