Massachusetts Cop Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Subscribing Member
Joined
·
1,151 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We know where U live: Hub tracks students for party-house crackdown
By Jennifer Rosinski
Sunday, January 23, 2005

Colleges are scrambling to get key information on off-campus renters to help the city quell raucous parties and stave off sports game debauchery - a move that has students crying foul, but neighbors rejoicing.

Spurred by the Fenway rioting that led to the death of Emerson College student Victoria Snelgrove by a police projectile, the City Council approved an ordinance requiring colleges to send the city clerk a report detailing the number of students enrolled and where they live - including totals for each ZIP code - by Feb. 15.

``It's not just an issue of breaking up parties, it's just knowing where we can direct our resources,'' said Capt. William Evans, who commands the Allston-Brighton district. ``I understand they're gonna have a good time, just don't let it get out of control.''

Snelgrove's death was the second in post-game celebrations last year. After the Pats won the Super Bowl in February, 21-year-old James Grabowski was killed near Northeastern University when a driver rammed into a rioting crowd of more than 300.

Neighbors say the ordinance is long overdue.

``At least there's an effort on their part,'' said Edward R. Archameault, who moved into an apartment on Allston's party-central Ashford Street nine years ago. ``Maybe then the students will realize they have to obey.''

Susan Khaladj-Bates has spent years watching from her compact Sawyer Terrace cul-de-sac as neighbors fled, thanks to the antics of students - who urinated in her Allston front yard while partying after Harvard's gridiron win against Yale last fall.

``I'll take anything. Anything will help. I see them in hordes of 200, 300 walking around and screaming,'' said Khaladj-Bates.

But students say they are often blamed for problems created by undergrads who live elsewhere - and question how a list of numbers and ZIP codes can help.

``So they will know 800 kids live in this area? I don't know how much it's going to change anything,'' Boston University senior Frank Gravino said from his living room. ``It just seems like a classic bureaucratic move.''

City Councilor Michael Ross, who sponsored the ordinance with Allston-Brighton Councilor Jerry McDermott, defended the measure.

``We're not trying to take away your civil liberties or go after you,'' he said. ``We want to make sure the student code of conduct is enforced. I've seen kids blow smoke in the face of the (Boston) police officers. When we involve the schools we make a difference.''

Emerson College senior and student government president Emily Garr said she isn't too concerned about the city's access to student population numbers, but worries about the policy's broader meaning.

``There's just one perception and that's of the obnoxious undergrad student and the good long-term resident,'' Garr said. ``We need to challenge our thinking to go beyond that.''
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
1,952 Posts
This wouldn't be necessary if the schools got involved in the first place. NU administration is such a joke and if it's not and they really are expelling/suspending students, we have NO idea. They are going to get there money from some sh*thead or someone else so why not toss the sh*thead out and try it fresh with another kid.
 

·
Retired Fed, Active Special
Joined
·
8,710 Posts
Yeah............
Like this is REALLY gonna help!
:roll:
 

·
Subscribing Member
Joined
·
1,151 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Riots come lesson-free: Rogue scholars remain enrolled :shock:
By Tom Farmer/ Herald Exclusive
Sunday, January 30, 2005

Three months after Mayor Thomas M. Menino called for summary expulsions of rowdy college students following the Red Sox World Series run, a Boston Herald investigation shows that few - if any - students have been kicked out of school.

With more potential violence looming if the New England Patriots win Super Bowl XXXIX next Sunday, a Herald review of 15 court cases involving students arrested last October shows that area colleges are reluctant to expel students arrested on relatively minor charges that in most cases ultimately are dismissed by the courts.

``It's up to the universities to punish them to the strongest extent punishable,'' said Seth Gitell, the mayor's spokesman. ``Wrongful behavior will not be tolerated and (the mayor) maintains his call for the strongest possible discipline for individuals who flout the rules of civilized society.''

The mayor called for colleges to ``immediately expel'' students who run afoul of the law after riot police accidentally killed Emerson College student Victoria Snelgrove in October. Betweenthe Red Sox' unprecedentedcome-from-behind American League Championship victory over the New York Yankees and their World Series sweep of the St. Louis Cardinals, police arrested some 20 college students on charges ranging from disorderly conduct to assault and battery with a dangerous weapon.

The Herald examined 15 of those Roxbury and Brighton District Court cases involving students from nine Boston schools.

Of those 15 cases, only one student is no longer enrolled. Citing federal confidentiality laws, Wentworth spokeswoman Jenny Amaral would not comment on whether freshman Nathan Cantrell, 21, of Arlington, was expelled after being arrested Oct. 28 for possession of fireworks, assault and battery with a dangerous weapon and disorderly conduct. A source close to the case said Cantrell was not expelled but chose not to return to Wentworth. Both Cantrell and attorney Paul Gannon declined comment.

Cantrell's case and six others remain before the court while eight other cases, all involving misdemeanor charges of disorderly conduct - and in several cases related charges - were continued without a finding for periods ranging between three months and one year. If the students who received CWOFs remain out of trouble for the length of their continuances, the charges will be dismissed.

Although college and police officials said many of the 15 students received suspensions following their arrests, all but Cantrell remain enrolled.

``It's kind of silly,'' said School of the Museum of Fine Arts student Dustin Farrenkopf, 20, of Connecticut, whose disorderly conduct case was CWOF for three months. ``It's like (the police) were trying to teach me a lesson. I know I was being a pain in the ass (by lying in front of a police line) but I didn't think I was doing anything illegal.'' Farrenkopf said he has not been disciplined by his college, and school spokeswoman Suzanne Matus said they were unaware Farrenkopf had been arrested until receiving a Herald inquiry. She said federal regulations prevent her from saying whether Farrenkopf will be disciplined.

Boston Police Capt. William Evans, who recently was appointed to work with all of the city's colleges to curb rowdy student behavior, said he agrees that a student shouldn't be expelled for a disorderly-conduct arrest with no prior offenses, but said it is important for colleges to take a zero-tolerance approach for bad behavior.

``I'm not looking for them to all be thrown out but I would like them suspended for at least the rest of the semester,'' said Evans, who ducked a bottle allegedly thrown by Boston College senior Angel Lopez, 21, of Providence, after the Red Sox won the World Series.

Evans said Lopez, whose case is pending, has been suspended by BC until his case is resolved.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top