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actually the issue of sheriffs powers has been debated frequently. it seems to be a confusing issue for most, even the sheriff themselves. I have done some research into to this issue because we actually had deputies patrolling our community on certain holiday's to assist us. First the SHERIFF himself is the chief law enforcement officer for his county. a deputy has all the same powers of arrest within his county as a police officer would have in his city/town. There are limitations though. The sheriffs right to arrest is not necessarily based on statute. it is based on common law and rights and powers granted to sheriffs over centuries. a deputy DOES have the right to stop a motor vehicle for a CMVI. a deputy CAN legally issue a citation for a CMVI. the breach of the peace ONLY part comes into to play with motor vehicles though. he may however summons for the offense. I'll try to find the case law I looked under and post it here. it is very interesting though if you research it.
 

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I located the two Massachusetts Case Law decisions reference Sheriff's authority to stop a m/v. These links were found on the Commonwealth Police Services, Inc.

Commonwealth v. Baez, 42 Mass.App.Ct. 565
Commonwealth v. Howe, 405 Mass. 332 (1989)

Hope it helps.
 

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As an officer working under these powers I can agree they aren't a blanket cover all. I'm not gonna start quoting Mass Law trying to make myself sound smarter than everyone but will tell you

#1 The powers are nice to have and cover your ass in a off property field stop, arrest, etc....

#2 The powers are limited in many ways on how your department allows you to use them.

I think the benefits of having them outweigh not having them and if you limit them under a policy in some manner you won't have to be concerned about people making chapter 90 cases that will be tossed out of court....It's unfortunate that all campuses aren't granted Chapter 90 bringing law enforcement in this State into the 21'st Century but I guess we have to work under the conditions given..So in short I'd say it's a benefit having them..Good Luck!!!!!
 

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Chapter 90 Enforcer
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They are good to have. Of course, as long as you stick to the Legal binds of the powers given... otherwise you open yourself upto lawsuits. But just like Police Officers (with Full LE Powers) you just need to learn how to apply the powers given in every situation, so what if you have to summons in some cases instead of arresting? It saves a shi%load of time with booking/processing and the shitbird will still have to answer to the charges.

One simple violation for which (deputized folks) can arrest for is trespassing, which I have found VERY helpful. You do not need breach of the peace for trespassing. All you need to do (as in any circumstance) is to ask the person to leave, if they refuse or just continue to stand/sit there and give you lip service "clink 'em". Then when you complete your report narrative you just need to indicate he/she was arrested for "Trespassing" and then you add the 'other' charges... it works.

Document verbal trespass notices in the dispatch log, when the shitbird comes back later that day "clink 'em". Obviously long term "banned from College property" cases should include written notices with a copy on file, and also "certified mail" to the shitbirds' residence. At my Campus PO job we keep an active list of the s-birds banned posted.

Of course A&B is also considered an "automatic" breach of the peace, cink 'em for that.

Just learn to apply the powers, and you'll be amazed what you can actually do. "Use the force Luke!"
 

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I found this online from the BC website.

General

The Boston College Police Department is responsible for the University's law enforcement and security functions. * These functions cannot be performed effectively without the support and cooperation of each member of the University community. To assist the University community in this effort, the following general policies and procedures define the role of the police at Boston College.

Policy

1. The primary function of the Boston College Police is to enforce the rules and regulations of the University, to enforce the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to protect and safeguard the rights, property, and privacy of individual members of the University community, to protect and safeguard University property, and, generally, to maintain the peace. ^
2. All police officers must attend and graduate from a police academy certified by the Massachusetts Criminal Justice Training Council.
3. All Boston College Police officers hold warrants under Chapter 22C, Section 63 of the Massachusetts General Laws. These warrants confer complete police powers within the designated jurisdiction, defined as any property owned or controlled by the University.
4. All Boston College Police officers generally hold Deputy Sheriff powers in Middlesex and Suffolk counties. The powers of Deputy Sheriff are similar to the powers of the Sheriff, and include the power to make arrests and to preserve the peace pursuant to the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Deputy Sheriff powers provide officers with the authority to respond as law enforcement officials, and to take reasonable action if necessary to prevent serious bodily harm to themselves or others, while on duty assignment that takes them off property owned or controlled by the University.
5. The Detective Bureau of the Boston College Police Department is staffed by officers with specialized investigative training. The members of this unit are responsible for criminal investigation on campus, and are assigned to dignitary protection as well as other duties, as determined by the Chief of the Boston College Police. Assigned officers work closely with students, faculty, and staff as required, and Bureau members serve as department liaison with other law enforcement agencies at the local, state, federal, and international levels.
6. The Boston College Police Department is responsible for regulating parking and traffic on University property. Pursuant to this, the Department's Parking and Traffic Department administers the University's PARKING AND TRAFFIC REGULATIONS, which are disseminated by the Office of Student Services to the University community in print and electronic format. Student Services also issues parking permit decals to all qualified persons to authorize parking during designated hours in designated areas of University property. Enforcement of the PARKING AND TRAFFIC REGULATIONS is the responsibility of the Boston College Police.
7. Any individual, department, or organization that requires the services of police officers for a function or activity sponsored by Boston College, or held on University property, must contract for those services through the office of the Chief of the Boston College Police.

It seems to me in order to be a near "full functioning" police agency, they have to take pieces from here and there and still can't make the grade. (thats not a slam-read on...) In order for some to be equally empowered like a municipality, they have to piece together powers from various locations. If the legislature saw fit to change it why haven't they yet? If the Colonel felt it necessary to expand an SSPO appointment (appointed under this chapter instead of that) why hasn't he? Its almost like building a boat with spare parts of cars and airplanes instead of just buying the boat.

My questions are WHY and WHY?

WHY is it necessary for a limited agency, by definiton (ie school, hospital, etc) to obtain the exact same level of authority as a city or town (or the State even?) when their own mission statement clearly states their job is beholden to the site*.

WHY would the same limited agency WANT the added liability for incidents not directly occurring on their own property?^

The CPO locally that I speak to seem satisfied with their authority and don't have fragments of appointments from here and there. This isn't targeting BC, I just came across the above and it got me thinking. Anyone???
 

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:2c:

"WHY is it necessary for a limited agency, by definiton (ie school, hospital, etc) to obtain the exact same level of authority as a city or town (or the State even?) when their own mission statement clearly states their job is beholden to the site*. "

Interesting question, although I would then ask, what level of authority would you deem adequate? Many of the schools, colleges and universities that I am aware of employ SSPO's because their authority can extend relative to the incidents that they may deal with. This is a direct result of their location and their community demographic, which is often similar to a small town. On the other hand, there are institutions that employ only security. Remember too that a police force is marketable and appealing (to parents and applicants) and additionally may give some latitude with internal issues.
(Also, it has been said before, colleges should deal with their own rudents when it comes to petty stuff and not have to call the city / town every time.)

(I suppose I didn't answer your question exactly...)

"WHY would the same limited agency WANT the added liability for incidents not directly occurring on their own property?"

Perhaps for the same reason above; some colleges are so large that it would be absurd for an institution's authority to stop before the sidewalk on a city street (or any other town/city-controlled public way) that is encompassed entirely by buildings and property that the institution owns. I would imagine that off-campus powers are applied sparingly in many responsible institutions.
 

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Czar of Cyncism and Satire
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The Universities in the area "cobble together" powers of arrest because believe it or not, crime does occure 15 feet within the campus grounds. Wouldn't it be nice to come out of the BU Police station, walk 45 feet to the right and observe on the Green line a man choking a woman in broad daylight, and you with SSPO powers as defined by Chapter 22C, Section 63 of the Massachusetts General Laws, cannot do a single thing about it.

Hey, I don't like overstepping the scope of my authority at all. Lord knows I have enough garbage to deal with but just because it happens across the street, does not make it a less of a crime in my eyes. The Sheriff's Department powers is a liability shield. Instead of being "Joe Citizen" in a police uniform, you are now "Campus Cop" who can do an amazing Stretch Armstrong immitation and grab the bad guy.

We are trained to act as Police Officers and attend Municipal & State Police academies along with every other cop in the state but once you go to work here is what it looks like.....
[<----Cop---->][<----Not a Cop---->][<----Cop---->][<----Not a Cop---->]

This is where the umbrella of the Sheriff's Department powers come into play. now, it's just....
[<----Cop---->][<----Not a Cop but a D/S---->][<----Cop---->][<----Not a Cop but a D/S---->]
 

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Well said HousingCop!!!

In many cities, it is often not reasonable (nor safe) to wait for the local PD to respond when the CPO is only 45 feet away...

10 seconds vs 5 minutes - If I was getting choked, axed or whatever else by someone that is armed with a dangerous weapon.. I would prefer the Police Officer standing 45 feet from me to be able to spray, shoot or wood shampoo the guy than wait another 3 to 5 minutes. In 3 minutes of being choked, that person could be dead.... It's not about "Power", it's about letting CPO's do their Job as a Police Officer in general. To allow them to have "stretch armstrong"- like powers gives them a better ability to make the Campus even safer.
 

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HC and RPD, you make good points, but do you really think saving a citizens hide is worth stepping on toes or bruising an ego.

Call the real police and assist him or her when they arrive (if asked).
 

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Oh Otto,

You are so correct, call the "Real Police" and wait 3-5 minutes while a citizen's life is at stake.

Yeah, the "Real Cop" who scored less on the C.S. test than me but who sat next to me in a Police academy for 17 weeks.
The "Real Cop" who only got the job because of a racial or ethnic or gender court decree.
The "Real Cop" who I beat out on in the physical and academic parts of the academy.
The "Real Cop" who often when he/she sees me on the street calls me over asks for advice on what he/she should do because they are too stupid.

I only hope it is you Otto who is getting their derby beat in in front of me. Only then will I dial 9-11 &amp; wait while the blood drains from your face. You're pathetic.
 

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Interesting... a rare moment where HousingCop and I agree on something... :lol:

Otto, you're more concerned with CPO's stepping on your toes or bruising your ego than you are for a Citizens life? CPO's helping someone in urgent need is NOT going to "take food from your kids mouths". And what happens when your "REAL" Police (finally) show-up? You take over. That doesn't sound like stepping on toes to me. If the CPO took an investigation over from you, then thats stepping on toes. Helping someone until the "REAL" Police get there is called something else... It's called stepping up to the plate. Public Safety is always our primary concern regardless if you're a municipal or a campus PO, our objectives are the same. Protect life and property.

Like HousingCop referred to... Many Campus PO's are side by side with Municipals when it comes to training... just because you work for a Town or City doesnt make you any Smarter or more advanced than a CPO. Some are just more fortunate than others and managed to land in a Town/City job.
 

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HC and RPD, I was being sarcastic. I'm on your side. Sorry if it didn't read that way.

I am also a "fake cop" with a full-time municipal academy.
 

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Otto,

Sarcasm cannot be detected in your posts just by the type alone. Jazz it up with a couple avatars. Kind of like......"I canI read your handwriting, not your mind." Lot of us "fake cops" out here who do a better job than the real guys since who think they have earned a sense of entitlement because they were Cadets and washed cars &amp; did donut runs for 2 years to earn their spot in the job.
 

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I'll offer my thoughts here as a newbie to this forum and a former BCPD Aux. PO (with no powers) for ~9 years back in the 1980s.

A lot of little rich kids go to BC and their mommies and daddies pay a lot of money and thus expect that BC will "take care of their little darlings", no matter how stupid they act. A lot of these kids live off-campus, and in order for BCPD to do the job that is expected of them by the parents (remember, these folks contrtibute millions each year to BC and BC doesn't want to jeopardize that), they need police powers off-campus. Likewise, the campus (or property used by BC) is spread out over many jurisdictions. When I worked in the dorms, Boston (Suffolk), Brookline (Norfolk) and Newton (Middlesex) property lines cut thru the main campus. BC Law is in Newton and they used to use the facilities that are now called Gillette Stadium in Foxboro occasionally for games.

Because BC has a ton of money, they don't mind spending it on training their officers. From my high level contact, I have every reason to believe that they are better trained than my local PD!
 

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HC and RPD, you make good points, but do you really think saving a citizens hide is worth stepping on toes or bruising an ego.

Call the real police and assist him or her when they arrive (if asked).
Otto - 1 question; are you out of your f'ing mind?
"saving a citizens hide" should be the single most important position of any cop in the state, regardless of employer or repercussion!
Really man, I have to ask if you made that post with a straight face, or are you simply running low on your thorazine...
:crazy:
 

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a former BCPD Aux. PO (with no powers) for ~9 years back in the 1980s.
WTF? A BCPD Aux.??
Yup, and as far as I know they still have them although I think the uniforms are now a different color. When I was there we had the same uniforms and badge with "Aux" on them.

There was a rape in one of the dorms, apparently by someone who was not a student and not invited in the building. Student groups demanded more police presence and a ranking BCPD officer knew where he could get some reasonably well trained officers to work the dorms on weekend nights. That was the start of the BCPD Aux. We also worked the football games (everyone got OT for that) and graduation.

They put the scheduling of the Aux under the responsibility of one of the BCPD Sgts. Lt Frank Tees (gone for a long time now) took it upon himself to provide us some decent training as well. Wasn't a bad gig.
 

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The jurisdiction is all of Boston (Boston-Southie,Dot., Rosi.,etc, Chelsea, Winthrop and Revere). Mainly I think the benefit is that you could pursue someone outside of your immediate location of your dept. and you could pursue someone in and throughout Boston if needed. I am pretty sure this is the reason. Hope it helps.
 
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