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Badges given out to wealthy and influential folks who probably donated $$$.

Sounds like a page ripped out of The Massachsuetts County Sheriffs Playbook.....

Call me crazy.........
 
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Badges given out to wealthy and influential folks who probably donated $$$.

Sounds like a page ripped out of The Massachsuetts County Sheriffs Playbook.....

Call me crazy.........
Dude, I agree with a lot of what you say, but the funky-colored font is really starting to get irritating.
 

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Dude, I agree with a lot of what you say, but the funky-colored font is really starting to get irritating.[/quote]

The last thing I want to be is irritating.

It must be me or my laptop, but it looks like the same color you responded with. I'm sorry, I've tried to tone it down, but it looks ok to me.

How does this look? <- should be light yellow.....
 

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Dude, I agree with a lot of what you say, but the funky-colored font is really starting to get irritating

The last thing I want to be is irritating.

It must be me or my laptop, but it looks like the same color you responded with. I'm sorry, I've tried to tone it down, but it looks ok to me.

How does this look? <- should be light yellow.....
It looks blinding like the sun...
 

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I think my eyes just started bleeding. maybe masscopsguy should start posting in these colors so we won't be able to read his effing posts.
 
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I am so sorry I am unable to change my font to Hot Pink. You will just have to read my posts in basic black... ( Gill, could you install a special rainbow font the next time you do an upgrade. That would be peachie!!!!!!)

Andrea Cabral tried to recall some special badges that were issued by Richie Rouse, but for some reason not one person felt the need to send back their badge and she let it go at that, because it made for a good one day story in the Herald?

Under Sheriff Rufo, the Suffolk Reserve Deputy program was eliminated. Rufo did have a group of political supporters who did some volunteer work including buying underwear for the inmates.


As I have posted before, The Sheriff's Departments don't give out the Reserve badges you have to buy one yourself at your favorite local cop supply store or online.
 

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This is an even more reprehensible "badge game" given that in CA, Sheriffs are full-fledged police. This would be like us handing out honorary Police badges here in MA.

Glad to see they have more sense about stopping this.
 

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Badges issued by ex-O.C. sheriff recalled

Taking steps to distance herself from Michael S. Carona, Sandra Hutchens plans to recall the 400 shields given to civilian volunteers, many of whom are wealthy and influential.

By Stuart Pfeifer and Christine Hanley
The Los Angeles Times

ORANGE COUNTY, Calif. - Orange County Sheriff Sandra Hutchens said Wednesday that she plans to recall all the badges that her indicted predecessor handed out to a group of more than 400 civilian volunteers, many the county's most wealthy and influential residents.
Hutchens said she was uncomfortable with the volunteers carrying badges, even though they are not exact replicas of those issued to the department's 1,800 sworn deputies. She said she wants to ensure that the so-called professional service responders are volunteering for the right reason -- public service -- and that the program is no longer tainted by allegations that badges were issued as political favors.
"I will lose some who are in it for the badge," she said. "Hopefully, I will keep the ones who do a lot for us."
The new sheriff revealed her plans on the same day she took further steps to distance herself from indicted former Sheriff Michael S. Carona. She named people from outside the department to her executive staff and released a draft copy of a new policy governing the issuance of concealed weapons permits. Carona had issued the permits to about 1,100 people, several of them political supporters.
"This is a momentous day for the Orange County Sheriff's Department. This is another sign we are moving into the future of the Orange County Sheriff's Department and not looking back," she told reporters as she introduced her top management at a news conference in Santa Ana.
Hutchens named retired Los Angeles County sheriff's Division Chief John Scott as undersheriff and retired Los Angeles Police Department Deputy Chief Mike Hillmann as one of her four assistant sheriffs.
Scott, 60, retired in 2005 after 36 years with the L.A. County Sheriff's Department. He most recently served as division chief overseeing its jails, the largest local jail system in the nation.
That experience will be critical in Orange County, where the jail system was the focus of a scathing district attorney's report that found some deputies at Theo Lacy Jail -- the county's largest -- napped, watched television and exchanged text messages as an inmate was beaten to death by other inmates.
Hillmann, a 41-year veteran of the LAPD, most recently served as deputy chief. He oversaw security for the 2000 Democratic National Convention. Hutchens did retain one member of Carona's command team. Jack Anderson, who served as interim sheriff after Carona was indicted on corruption charges, will also be an assistant sheriff, in charge of administration.
Two other veterans of the department, Mike James and John B. Davis, will round out the team of assistant sheriffs. James, a 23-year veteran, managed patrol operations in Lake Forest. Davis has been with the department 27 years and previously oversaw patrol operations in San Juan Capistrano.
In June, the Board of Supervisors appointed Hutchens as Carona's replacement. Carona resigned in January to concentrate on his upcoming corruption trial.
Carona's command staff choices were among the biggest problems in the nine years he served as sheriff. Former Assistant Sheriff George Jaramillo was convicted of misusing public resources, and Assistant Sheriff Donald Haidl pleaded guilty to tax evasion. Both are expected to testify against Carona at his trial, now scheduled for Oct. 28.
Another problem area for Carona was the special volunteer unit he launched shortly after taking office in 1999, filling the ranks with business executives, doctors, lawyers and owners of upscale restaurants like Antonello's, a popular eatery for Orange County power brokers. Many contributed to Carona's campaign.
For years, the volunteers were issued badges that were nearly identical to those used by deputies. The badges for volunteers were changed about two years ago.
To Hutchens, the modified badges were still too similar in design to the authentic ones. She is considering giving plaques or something other than badges to reward volunteers who provide time, expertise and other services that might otherwise cost the department money.
For example, she said, earlier this month volunteer Tim Reynolds piloted his own plane to carry two investigators to Juarez, Mexico, to rescue a 9-year-old Orange County boy who had been kidnapped by his father.
Hutchens said she also wants to change the name of the program to further distance it from the problems of the previous administration. Under Carona, the professional service responder program was tarnished by allegations that badges were being handed out to his political allies, that reserves who contributed to his campaign did not have to go through training or background checks, and that some were misusing their credentials.
Carona has denied favoritism. But former Assistant Sheriff Haidl told investigators that the reserve program was a fundraising arm for Carona and that badges could be bought for a $1,000 donation.
Hutchens said she has been assured by reserve program commanders that "problem" volunteers have been let go. But she still wants to review the list and eliminate those who are not contributing.
Among those recently let go was Henry Samueli, the billionaire co-founder of Broadcom and owner of the Anaheim Ducks. He turned in his badge and identification card last month after pleading guilty to a single felony charge of lying to regulators about his role in an alleged plot to secretly reward employees by manipulating stock options.

Wire Service
 

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California Volunteers Turn in Their Badges

STUART PFEIFER
Los Angeles Times

Retired postal worker John Reichardt was looking for a way to fill his free time when he joined the Orange County Sheriff's Department's volunteer program three years ago.
The 68-year-old Santa Ana resident now works about 30 hours a week at John Wayne Airport, searching for unattended luggage, inspecting trucks carrying shipments into the airport and helping travelers negotiate their way through busy terminals.
Like all of the 429 Professional Services Responder volunteers, Reichardt does this free of charge. That's why he was hurt when Sheriff Sandra Hutchens announced last month that she was recalling badges issued to the volunteers.
"It felt like a punch to the stomach," he said.
Hutchens said she took that step because of concern that the program had been tainted by publicity that former Sheriff Michael S. Carona once filled its ranks with political supporters and business associates. The department was also concerned by a published opinion last year from the state attorney general that said it was illegal to issue badges to the public that could be mistaken for peace officer badges.
The Professional Services Responder Program has long been considered a haven for the county's rich and powerful. Orange County Republican Party operators Michael Schroeder and Adam Probolsky are members. Until he pleaded guilty in a stock manipulation case, so was Henry Samueli, the billionaire co-founder of Broadcom and owner of the Anaheim Ducks.
Hutchens said she was concerned by reports that a former Carona assistant told federal agents that Carona gave reserve deputy badges to 86 people in exchange for donations of $1,000 to his first campaign in 1998.
Some reserve deputies have been accused of flashing their badges to gain favor with law enforcement or other officials.
Carona was charged last fall under a broad corruption indictment that accused him of exchanging the power of his office for tens of thousands of dollars in cash and gifts.
In a recent letter to the volunteers, Hutchens said: "It is essential for us to unburden ourselves from the perceptions that have shadowed your outstanding work." The department is sending self-addressed envelopes to each of the Professional Services Responder volunteers so they could mail in their badges. As of Thursday, the department had received 87 badges.
Hutchens said she intended to issue alternative forms of identification -- specifics are still undecided -- and would rename the volunteer program.
Reichardt, who arrives at John Wayne Airport about 5:30 a.m. several days a week, said the badge helped him build rapport with airport visitors. Now he'll make do with a black polo shirt that reads "Airport Operations Division Sheriff Volunteer."
"We don't flash badges or look for extra perks. We're not what the media puts across," Reichardt said in an interview this week. "We're respectable people who want to give back to the community."
Reichardt is one of more than 50 volunteers who have worked at the airport in the last year. He recently noticed a woman who had become ill and made a call that helped her get emergency medical attention. He's also alerted deputies to people in the terminal who appear to be intoxicated or upset.
"The extra eyes and ears make it probably the safest airport in the country," said Sheriff's Lt. Tom Slayton, who oversees the volunteer program.
Concern about the badge revocation has prompted Hutchens to schedule a meeting this month with the volunteers. She said she wanted to let them know that she appreciated their service and intended to continue the program, but with a new name and no badges.
"This undeserved stigma is rooted in the program's past and is no longer accurate. However, the badges, which have become a lightning rod for criticism and mistrust, are its most visible legacy and serve to undermine your service and tarnish the reputation of the program," she said in her letter to the volunteers.
The volunteers also work at the Orange County Fair and offer such professional expertise as Web and graphic design. Many of the volunteers are pilots who provide air travel to deputies during investigations. Last month, volunteer Tim Reynolds piloted his own plane to carry two investigators to Juarez, Mexico, to rescue a 9-year-old Orange County boy who had been kidnapped by his father.
"The program had such a bad reputation under Carona, but the truth is it's extremely positive," said Sheriff's Capt. Brian Wilkerson. "The overwhelming majority of the people aren't upset that they're losing the badge."

Story From:Los Angeles Times
 

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This debacle created by Carona has created a real nightmare. In typical knee-jerk fashion, there is now legislation being pushed through in CA that would make it so that even a retired peace officer could not posess a badge. Our dept. issues badges that clearly say "Retired" on them when an officer is honorably retired from the department. Now some civilian legislators are going to say that a guy who put 25 years on the line has no right to carry the badge that he earned?
 
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