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Truro officer interviewed for Kingston chief
TRURO - Police Lt. John Lundborn, a 15-year veteran of the Truro Police Department, is in the running to become Kingston's new police chief.

Lundborn is expected to be interviewed by selectmen of the South Shore town Tuesday evening, according to officials in Kingston Town Administrator Kevin Donovan's office.

Stow Police Chief Joseph J. Rebello and New Bedford police Capt. Ronald E. Teachman are also seeking the position. Kingston Police Chief Gordon Fogg, a 30-year veteran of the 20-plus-person department, is retiring, Kingston officials said. He has been chief since 1996. The salary for the contract position is negotiable, a town official said.

Lundborn, who grew up in Marshfield, has been employed by the Truro department since 1989. He is second in command after Thomas. Listed among Lundborn's qualifications for the job is his criminal justice background; his experience as an accident-reconstruction specialist; and his experience as a "high-profile incident investigator and photographer," having worked on the Christa Worthington murder investigation.
 

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If the powers to be in Kingston read this board then listen up. I happen to know Ron Teachman. He is one of the most brilliant officers I have ever dealt with. Captain Teachman will make a great police chief. The question is which city/town is going to get past the political BS and appoint him chief. He is a great cop, a good lawyer, and a so-so DJ, but two out of three is not bad. Good Luck Ron.
 

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Kingston Paper:

This week selectmen met with the three finalists competing to be Kingston's next police chief, as the current chief, Gordon Fogg, prepares to retire on Friday, Oct. 1.

For well over two hours, selectmen interviewed the three applicants who spoke on issues ranging from budgetary matters and community relations, to policing philosophies and leadership styles, quizzing the candidates on imagined scenarios and their thoughts on certain policies.

At the meeting's conclusion, the selectmen agreed to postpone a decision until their next meeting, Tuesday, Oct. 5, because of what they said were "impressive" choices.

In the meantime, Lt. Thomas Kelley was appointed acting chief of police for Kingston, effective Oct. 2.

The three finalists were Joseph J. Rebello, currently the chief of the Stow, Mass. Police Department; John R. Lundborn, a lieutenant and executive officer for the police department in Truro; and Ronald E. Teachman, a captain in the New Bedford Police Department.

Rebello has been police chief in Stow since July 2001. Prior to that, he was the police chief for nine years in Monson, Mass. Rebello was also the part-time chief of police in Shutesbury for three years before moving on to Monson.

Describing his experiences, Rebello stated that at each job he was charged with a different task, but always held to his own principles of the role police play in the community.

"In Monson, my charge was to clean house," Rebello said of the once-troubled department, but "in Stow, it [the department] didn't need to be overhauled, just fine tuned."

Apart from navigating a procedural balance as police chief in different communities, Rebello has also instituted programs to monitor the homes of vacationing residents, as well as elderly residents living alone. Rebello also made strides to connect with citizens, and in particular, one specific connection has become a monthly tradition known as the "Man's Breakfast," where police officers get together with seniors to spend time together.

Selectmen then interviewed Lundborn, who emphasized his goal of earning accreditation for the Kingston Police Department. Lundborn's belief that accreditation - although a voluntary program - will help to raise the professional standard and the reputation of the department to a higher level.

Lundborn outlined his view of a police department, which, he says, should be based on "outreach" and "input." Visibility was a key issue, which Lundborn says helps to open channels of communication by giving the community a sense of familiarity with the officers on the force.

Lundborn also expressed his attachment to the South Shore region, having been born in Quincy and raised in Marshfield. Moving to Kingston would be an ideal career choice, but Lundborn said he also had a personal desire to relocate, saying, "I want to come home."

Teachman, the final candidate, described a policing style similar to the previous two applicants, but from the perspective of an urban area. Despite its size, New Bedford, Teachman explained, was divided into neighborhoods and the involvement of the officers was tailored to the needs of each specific neighborhood.

As a captain on New Bedford's police force, Teachman is involved in multiple areas of the department all at one time, especially administrative and policing aspects, giving him a range of experience. From collective bargaining and budgeting, to grant writing and media relations, Teachman has sought the responsibilities required of a police chief, but more than that, he says, he has always had a desire to serve the public.

During his interview, Teachman said he had also worked with people with drug and alcohol addictions, as well as adults with Downs syndrome, bringing them out of institutions and back into the community.

Becoming a police officer, he said, was a logical shift in careers where he felt he could make his service to the public the most valuable.

Posted Tue 28 Sep, 2004 21:52:

lots of people talking:

http://www.kingstonobserver.com/for...c772f64cc1b7f8e1&act=ST&f=3&t=221

Posted Tue 16 Nov, 2004 20:31:
 
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