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Chapter 90 Enforcer
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Deputies do have Police Powers, however they are limited, but they still can arrest. Many Campus Police departments use Deputy Sheriff powers to have an "exapanded range" throughout the county (i.e. off property as state Specials only have powers on property for the most part). Deputy Sheriff Powers are actually all Campus PD's really need when you consider the powers of Deputies.

Campus Police use the deputy Sheriff Powers for LE. Sheriffs Dept's do not use the powers for LE purposes. For the most part they are merely corrections as they often have less LE training than Campus Police Officers...
 

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From what I have been told, Deputy Sheriffs are LE. I only know of one area that is not and I believe it is Constables. From what I have been told, Alliance Security has more LE powers than that of the Constable. :lol:

Just kidding Hunter,

I couldn't resist.........No pun intended
 
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Discussion Starter #4
oh I'm well aware of there powers and duties, authority, and jurisdiction.I just want to know what peoples opinons are, are they considered LE, or not. I dont mean in the capacity which you speak of I mean the sheriffs dept as a whole. I'm curious what people think of where the sheriffs are on the LE totem pole?

Do people consider them police or corrections.

I know there considered police officers by MGL and common law but whats peoples opinons, hey and what about writ office guys are they LE or no.

Hmmm,Interesting to see what opinons this draws?
 
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Discussion Starter #5
shawnr76 said:
From what I have been told, Deputy Sheriffs are LE. I only know of one area that is not and I believe it is Constables. From what I have been told, Alliance Security has more LE powers than that of the Constable. :lol:

Just kidding Hunter,

I couldn't resist.........No pun intended
Funny I hear the same. :roll:

HAHAHA, according to some here you would be correct in that statement,LOL :shock:
 

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""Sheriffs Dept's do not use the powers for LE purposes. For the most part they are merely corrections as they often have less LE training than Campus Police Officers...""

Hmm, I don't know if I agree with these statements. "Do Not" is a strong statement. I could throw down a few arrests made by my boys this month, so I don't know if "Do Not" is the right choice of words here. The second half of your statement "merely" is a bit demeaning, and somewhat innacurate. However it is true that I "merely" spend 40 hours a week with the dirtbags you arrest.

All and all this seems like the beginnings of another "I'm a real cop" "No I am", "You're Departments a Bunch of Hacks" posting. Please be careful to be intellegent when you reply to this topic.
 

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Chapter 90 Enforcer
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Pearl,

Sorry not trying to bash Deputies... A few of my friends are Deputies. I was referring to the basic functions LE vs. Corrections. And yes I understand you guys deal with the dirtbags we bust, a task not many would want, but you guys (for the most part) do it proudly.

My apologies for the demeaning "merely". If you're in Essex County, that's great!! As far as I'm concerned Essex is the best S.O. to work for. And I'm not kissing up when I say that. I've taken a few classes with your folks and about 1/3 of my R/I Academy had Deputies from Essex and those folks were sharp. Middlesex is great too.

You wanna talk about hack jobs?.. look at Suffolk, pre-Cabral. (probably not an intelligent response, but I'll type it anyway.)

In the future I'll try to Identify exempt Offices...lol...
 

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Grim reaper
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I know this will most likely blow up some people's skirts sideways, but I just report law and case law. Deputy sheriffs are appointed by the Sheriff who is elected by voters within their county. He is an elected official. Where I got confused is when county govts started getting abolished by the State. However, the District Attorney is elected in the same manner, county government or not and the answer I got is they were not part of the abolishment. I don't know about other areas but in Hampden County the State pays the bills. Deputies have specific powers granted under law and are given the authority to carry weapons, cuffs, etc under Ch 147 Sec 8A. In Comm v Baez, the Appeals Court ruled that deputy sheriffs have Chapter 90 powers, although the law allows the Registrar to issue citation books to "Police Chiefs" and makes no mention of sheriff or deputy. However, the Court found they cannot arrest for any offenses not involving breaches of peace or without a warrant. This, I would suggest, severely limits their arrest power since many misdemeanors are arrestable by statute. The Courts have specifically stated what they can and cannot do and never ruled they arent governmental employees.

This is where I get confused. Is a CO employed full time at a jail also appointed as a deputy sheriff? I know many many "deputies" who send in $50 to a political fundraiser and become "deputy sheriffs" or who say they "took a class to become a deputy" and now serve civil process. Are there 3 separate categories? Do these civil process servers annoy those who work daily in the Jails? What is the "law enforcement division"? It seems they are all the same but one group certainly worked harder and works fulltime compared to the others.

Anyone....anyone....Bueller....anyone?
 

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Grim reaper
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PS

Pearl,
I just read a post you submitted May 19, 2003 re: Sheriff/DOC merger. It sort of corroborated a part of what I have said above. The points you made of why you were/are personally against such a merger and don't think it will happen are valid... but, all I can say is... Never Say Never. In 1991 talk of a merger between the MDC Police, Capital Police and RMV Police with the State Police seemed far fetched and had the same Union, Rank and contract issues you mentioned. Then it was done.

With the stroke of a pen, things are done but the fallout is rarely figured in.
 

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USMC,

About the different catigories, I'm not 100% sure but I do have a friend who works for Norfolk County and when he first started there he was a CO and after a year he was given the option to take the Reserve Police Academy, which he did and when he graduated he was then Deputized as a Deputy Sheriff and then he could do details,etc... if that helps anyone. As far as if I personally feel that Deputy Sheriffs are LEO Officers, I say YES.

Stay Safe

USMC, SEMPER FI
 

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RPD931 said:
For the most part they are merely corrections as they often have less LE training than Campus Police Officers...
I'm not sure if you are familiar with what training a lot of Deputy Sheriff's have. I'd say the vast majority of the have a full Corrections Academy plus the Reserve/Intermittent Academy which is not only enough to qualify them for an SSPO waiver it also adds up to somewhere around a total of 600 hours of training. Granted that still falls short of the approximately 720 hours that the SSPO Academy is up to now, but also factor in that like Pearl posted they usually spend 40+ hours a week working in the HOC or Jail (OJT has to count for something). Back on topic though the only Sheriff's Office I'm real familiar with has two totally separate Deputy Divisions Law Enforcement and civil Process, so yes the LED Deputies are obviously Law Enforcement (ie; Academy certified and most are either CO's or from another Department), and the Civil Division basically speaks for itself.
 

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Just to answer a few questions, or at least take a shot at it:

At least for my department, I completed the MA DOC Training Academy, and was appointed as a Corrections Officer. During my first year, I attended MCJTC Reserve Acadmey, and after my years probation, I was appointed as a Deputy Sheriff.

As far as state and county government. Sheriff's Department's which were taken over by the state after abolishment of county government, were absorbed into the Department of Public Safety. Despite the fact that most departments still bear the name "County", most are State entities. There is rumor however, that we will shortly be becoming (some letterhead has already changed) the "Essex Sheriff's Office". The District Attorney's Office's are also undergoing state absorbtion. You will notice that officially, your district attorney's office no longer refers to itself as the "X County District Attorney's Office". I know here in Essex, it is referred to the "Northeast Distirct Attorney's Office". I believe the registry of deeds is the only "county" operated agency here in Essex. Although I'm not sure how that works now that there is no more Essex County Government.

As far as the question about civil process, a Deputy Sheriff is a Deputy Sheriff as far as the law is concerned. I don't really run into the Civil Process guys too much, so I don't know a heck of alot about them, but they all seem to be pretty good guys. They do wear different badges than we do, not sure why. Most are part-timers who work in some other aspect of law enforcment, who serve papers in some of the less populated areas. The full-timers handle more of the heavy duty stuff such as arrests, evictions, repossessions. All seem like good guys to me.

Suffolk prior to Cabral? I've heard alot of stories but never seen it, so I can't speak. I've met her several times, as she is a ally of my Sheriff. Seems like a nice enough lady, but the Jury is still out. Give her some time and I'll evaluate :wink: .

Nothing personal about the "Merley" comment. I just take point to point out some of the things people say and the accidental biases people put out there without knowing or meaning them.
 

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Out of the Loop
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Let's answer that question by figuring out what "Law Enforcement" means.

In the context of the term Law Enforcement, law refers to this definition:

law
Pronunciation: 'lo
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Old English lagu, of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse log law; akin to Old English licgan to lie -more at LIE
Date: before 12th century
1 a (1) : a binding custom or practice of a community : a rule of conduct or action prescribed or formally recognized as binding or enforced by a controlling authority (2) : the whole body of such customs, practices, or rules (3) : COMMON LAW b (1) : the control brought about by the existence or enforcement of such law (2) : the action of laws considered as a means of redressing wrongs; also : LITIGATION (3) : the agency of or an agent of established law c : a rule or order that it is advisable or obligatory to observe d : something compatible with or enforceable by established law e : CONTROL, AUTHORITY

Enforcement:
en·force
Pronunciation: in-'fOrs, -'fors, en-
Function: transitive verb
Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French enforcier, from Old French, from en- + force force
Date: 14th century
1 : to give force to : STRENGTHEN
2 : to urge with energy
3 : CONSTRAIN, COMPEL
4 : obsolete : to effect or gain by force
5 : to carry out effectively <enforce laws>

Since the term "Law Enforcement" covers such a broad variety of duties, responsibilities and actions, and regardless of what police powers Deputy Sheriffs in MA have, because there are definitions that can be applied to what exactly it is that they do, I would say yes.

Also, according to the above definitions, a mall security guard is a Law Enforcement officer. Do they enforce the rules, regulations, and laws of the mall? Yes. Do they apprehend shoplifters, in which shoplifting is a prosecutable crime? Yes. Do they make arrests? No. They are by no means police officers, but they are still in the same salad bowl of law and order.
 
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Discussion Starter #15
Officer Dunngeon said:
Let's answer that question by figuring out what "Law Enforcement" means.

In the context of the term Law Enforcement, law refers to this definition:

law
Pronunciation: 'lo
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Old English lagu, of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse log law; akin to Old English licgan to lie -more at LIE
Date: before 12th century
1 a (1) : a binding custom or practice of a community : a rule of conduct or action prescribed or formally recognized as binding or enforced by a controlling authority (2) : the whole body of such customs, practices, or rules (3) : COMMON LAW b (1) : the control brought about by the existence or enforcement of such law (2) : the action of laws considered as a means of redressing wrongs; also : LITIGATION (3) : the agency of or an agent of established law c : a rule or order that it is advisable or obligatory to observe d : something compatible with or enforceable by established law e : CONTROL, AUTHORITY

Enforcement:
en·force
Pronunciation: in-'fOrs, -'fors, en-
Function: transitive verb
Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French enforcier, from Old French, from en- + force force
Date: 14th century
1 : to give force to : STRENGTHEN
2 : to urge with energy
3 : CONSTRAIN, COMPEL
4 : obsolete : to effect or gain by force
5 : to carry out effectively <enforce laws>

Since the term "Law Enforcement" covers such a broad variety of duties, responsibilities and actions, and regardless of what police powers Deputy Sheriffs in MA have, because there are definitions that can be applied to what exactly it is that they do, I would say yes.

Also, according to the above definitions, a mall security guard is a Law Enforcement officer. Do they enforce the rules, regulations, and laws of the mall? Yes. Do they apprehend shoplifters, in which shoplifting is a prosecutable crime? Yes. Do they make arrests? No. They are by no means police officers, but they are still in the same salad bowl of law and order.
So would Constables be law enforcement? They enforce Capias arrest warrants issued by judges? Hmmm just curious.
 

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in Plymouth County the sheriff is currently defending himself in court for firing over 30 Deputies who supported his opponent in the election. he then turned around and replaced them with family members, pals and the leader of the local Democrat (aka:Commiecrat) group. the guys he fired had years of experience but were replaced with liberal democrat hacks - no way would i consider any deputy appointed by the plymouth county sheriff to be law enforcement. the k9 guys are good men, but most of the deputies get their positions by holding campaign signs.
 

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Sheriff's Dept. Deputies

Deputy Sheriff's in Suffolk County are mandated to be MCJTC certified as well as to attend the yearly refresher class. They also receive several in-service classes including, but not limited to, self defense, handcuffing, service baton, pepper spray, c.p.r./first responder with the AED, firearms training and mandatory qualifying twice a year. Most have additional training such as S.E.R.T. and crowd control training, fire safety training with the Scott Air Pac/search and rescue along with fire safety, HazMat training. This is just a basic list of the training Deputy Sheriff's receive on an annual basis. As far as not being trained as well as Campus cops, this is not the case. Some Correction officers never become Deputy Sheriff's and yes, most Deputies do work full time inside the wall. I also would say that they are LE officers. Suffolk has had their share of problems, but, for all of the hard working officers, GREAT JOB!!! Hope this clears up some misunderstanding about DS's. Thank you for you time

Play it safe!!!
Call911 :wink:
 

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Chapter 90 Enforcer
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jimbo said:
in Plymouth County the sheriff is currently defending himself in court for firing over 30 Deputies who supported his opponent in the election. he then turned around and replaced them with family members, pals and the leader of the local Democrat (aka:Commiecrat) group. the guys he fired had years of experience but were replaced with liberal democrat hacks - no way would i consider any deputy appointed by the plymouth county sheriff to be law enforcement. the k9 guys are good men, but most of the deputies get their positions by holding campaign signs.
Shame on the Public who voted for this Sheriff. Having a "few friends" doesn't get you elected... having thousands of people vote for you gets you elected... so, shame on the people who vote for hack' sheriffs.
 

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Chapter 90 Enforcer
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masstroopers1 said:
I noticed there wasn't any training listed in motor vehicle or criminal law, constitutional issues, community policing, domestic violence, motor vehicle crash investigation, juvenile crime, patrol procedures, intoxicated driver identification and investigation, speed measuring devices, auto theft, white collar crimes, civil / elder / handicapped rights, death notification, narcotics identification and investigation....
MT1,
If you are referring to the MCJTC Reserve Academy, It does cover just about all of those topics... I guess you never started there..
 
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