Massachusetts Cop Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
367 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After about three years, the CHP will be accepting on-line applications during a short period of time in January, 2013. If you are interested, here is the data available:

[quote]Applications will be accepted online only during a three day recruitment effort that begins Thursday, January 3 and continues through Saturday, January 5. Those interested in applying will need to return and visit "Apply Online for Cadet."[/quote]

I have no idea when the first class of 2013 will be held or if there will be an expedited screening. If interested go here: http://www.chp.ca.gov/recruiting/officer.html

Good luck to all who may apply.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,852 Posts
I think if you're a motor officer you can take your bike home? I remember that for some reason (at least back in the late 80's)
 

·
Subscribing Member
Joined
·
3,484 Posts
Papa Bear can probably give a definitive answer but I do believe so. I know most, if not all, LA County agencies allow their motor officers (including LAPD) to bring their bikes home.
 

·
Subscribing Member
Joined
·
2,134 Posts
Disclamer, THIS IS NOT A DIG. But after reading the stuff on the site, I did not know that CHP had State wide jurisdiction. I was always under the impression that they were a strict highway patrol.....
They used to be, however, in 1995 or so, they merged with "state police". They handle incidents occuring on state property, in addition to all the highway stuff. So, if something was happening at say, the DMV (RMV), they respond - be it a licensing matter or a domestic in the parking lot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
367 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
They used to be, however, in 1995 or so, they merged with "state police". They handle incidents occuring on state property, in addition to all the highway stuff. So, if something was happening at say, the DMV (RMV), they respond - be it a licensing matter or a domestic in the parking lot.
Since 1929, the CHP has had Statewide jurisdiction. If there is some doubt, remember the first word in the name of the agency - "CALIFORNIA" The unofficial motto is "All roads, all codes!"

To address take-home vehicle: All motorcycle officers take their bikes home; Captains and above have a take home unit; most investigators have a take home; Some special duty personnel have take homes assigned; some protective service personnel, who are on call, have a take home. The majority of the CHP officers live within a short commute of their assigned office.

The reference of the merger with the state police in the mid 90's was of benefit, mostly, to those State Police officers and personnel who received ample pay and benefits increases. The merger simplified the protective services detail and did away with duplicity of services. It did not change, alter, modify or increase the authority of CHP Officers. The one benefit to CHP officers is the previous name of "Traffic Officer" was changed simply to "Officer". That title was based on the majority of active personnel at the time who voted on whether they wanted the title to be Officer, Trooper, Traffic Officer, Agent, etc. Overwhelmingly, they opted for Officer.

At its creation in 1929, officers were known as State Traffic Officers. That changed to Traffic Officer in the 1970's and is now Officer.

An Officer's initial assignment out of the academy can be anywhere in the state. Most initial assignments are for a period of one year. After that an officer may request assignment to the area of their choice and assignments are based on departmental seniority. Pay grades are scheduled for every year for five years after successfully completing probation. There is a pay schedule on the site I provided which also lists other pay benefits - education, seniority, special assignments or skills (pilots, flight officers, motorcycles, investigators, etc.). Other benefits are nominal and well described..
 

·
Subscribing Member
Joined
·
3,484 Posts
Disclamer, THIS IS NOT A DIG. But after reading the stuff on the site, I did not know that CHP had State wide jurisdiction. I was always under the impression that they were a strict highway patrol.....
As a general rule, the CHP does not normally perform the same duties of Mass Staties. At least in the major cities and in southern California, the CHP usually keeps to the freeways and don't do municipal type law enforcement like Mass Staties do. In my entire time on the job, I've never seen CHP officers assisting with crime problems like the Staties do in Boston, Brockton, Lowell, etc. Also, when a significant criminal act occurs on the freeways, in general, the "Chippies" don't handle it, the local municipal agency will do so. Crimes such as ADWs, homicides, etc. At least that's the way it is in southern California.

However, I'm sure PapaBear can verify but I do believe in the smaller areas of the state like up north, Chippies do perform municipal type law enforcement.

Papa, I've always been curious why you guys opted for "Traffic Officer" and later just plain "Officer" and not Police Officer or Trooper.
 

·
Subscribing Member
Joined
·
3,484 Posts
I've talked to him a couple of times in the last few years. He still looks just like he did in that picture, even the hair hasn't changed a bit. I guess the Chippie life agreed with him.

And yes, he's a big supporter of the CHP.
 
G

·
Since 1929, the CHP has had Statewide jurisdiction. If there is some doubt, remember the first word in the name of the agency - "CALIFORNIA" The unofficial motto is "All roads, all codes!"
I believe the Florida Highway Patrol has limited jurisdiction off state roads.

The reference of the merger with the state police in the mid 90's was of benefit, mostly, to those State Police officers and personnel who received ample pay and benefits increases. The merger simplified the protective services detail and did away with duplicity of services. It did not change, alter, modify or increase the authority of CHP Officers.
One of my favorite patches in my collection is the California State Police.....very rare, even more so now that they're defunct.
 

·
Needs more complaints
Joined
·
4,309 Posts
I went through the whole process and got an offer until family issues kept me here. Pretty streamlined process for out-of-staters. There may be no take-homes but...last time I was there I think you can still have a mustache :cool:

The biggest issue is where you're going to live. *Most* Boots out of training end up in LA County or SF County...where the cost of living prohibits any type of luxurious lifestyle. Single, with a roommate, and a beater car or public transportation...it's doable. But don't think you're going to raise a family on one CHP salary right out of the gates.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
367 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
LACopper> There are police duties performed by CHP officers in SoCA. For example, in the Angeles National Forest regions there are very few LEO's. When I worked in Pomona I was the single CHP officer assigned to Mount Baldy. I had one USFS Ranger, 1 LASD deputy (on call) and one San Bernardino Co. SD Deputy for all areas between Glendora and what is now Rancho Cucamonga and from the city limits of Glendoa, San Dimas, LaVerne, Upland, Rancho Cucamonga to the top of the mountain range. I handled every call one could imagine. Took all preliminary information for the appropriate agency and forwarded my investigation reports to that agency for followup, if needed. Most were cabin burglaries, malicious mischief, destruction of private property, unlawful use of private residences in a National Forest Reserve. At times I would have to call in a helicopter to reach some of the more remote locations. But, that was in the early 70's. None of the agencies, except the USFS have permanently assigned officers in the mountains of that region.

Many remote areas of the CHP are functioning in a similar manner.

Finally, to answer the question about the newer rank of "Officer" I have no idea why the troops opted for Officer over Trooper. I think tradition had more to do with it than anything else. I don't know if that will change with a few other mergers being researched; we will have to wait and see.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
367 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
If your into gambling with your pesnion, give CA a shot...
Not an issue. The pensions for State Employees are handled by the California Public Employees Retirement System - one of the richest, most stable and growing retirement systems in the nation. Actually, in the world. CA PERS is well managed and out of reach of the CA lawmakers. CA PERS has made loans to the state in the past and they have been repaid. I have every confidence in the CA PERS programs and don't think one should worry.

The issues affecting retirements in CA is what the locals contribute and how they are managed within PERS. Municipalities are having difficulty in financing their employee retirements.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
Not an issue. The pensions for State Employees are handled by the California Public Employees Retirement System - one of the richest, most stable and growing retirement systems in the nation. Actually, in the world. CA PERS is well managed and out of reach of the CA lawmakers. CA PERS has made loans to the state in the past and they have been repaid. I have every confidence in the CA PERS programs and don't think one should worry.

The issues affecting retirements in CA is what the locals contribute and how they are managed within PERS. Municipalities are having difficulty in financing their employee retirements.
Good to know thanks for clarifying. I heard of some Counties out there are having a real hard time and actually one large city filling bankruptcy

http://edition.cnn.com/2012/06/27/business/california-stockton-bankruptcy/index.html
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top