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Are there any members on here who are (or were) Commissioned Officers in any branch of the Military? If so, which branch?

What has going through OCS and being a Commissioned Officer done for you personally?

Besides gaining veteran status, do you feel that being a Commissioned Officer has helped significantly set you apart from other applicants when being hired by a Police Department?

Thanks for any and all replies!
 

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Retired Fed, Active Special
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Well...
I went to E-6 in 9 years of active duty. Then I went back in as warrant and made the jump to Lt(jg) I served as a division training officer and then small unit XO.
On the surface, I don't think it made much difference to the bosses in my police jobs. I think they like veterans for the same reason, either enlisted or commissioned.
:baby21:
 

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Besides gaining veteran status,
I know a LT that does not have veteran status yet. He does not have 180 days of active duty, not in a training status. Otherwise, it's definitely more responsibility, $$$$, and a bigger retirement($$$$).
 

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Grim reaper
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we all know who really runs the show when it hits the fan.....and its not some 90 day shavetail wonder :)
 

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Masscops Therapist
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the ring knockers were the worst.
 

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I have researched this topic and it does set you from the pack, since even a weekend warrior can get vet preference, being an officer shows that you have dedication, ability to multi-task, and have leadership. Those are strong qualities that yes even an E-5 can posses but at the O-level its a different set of standards.

Officers, atleast in the Marine Corps, are held to a higher standard then enlisted (but this is true with almost any branch) An Officer Candidate must have no criminal record, (or atleast no felonies) have a degree, higher pft score, more professional appearance (ie no visible tattoos) no medical history (such as asthma, bad vision etc) and testicular fortitude. OCC is not a walk in the park and has a high drop out rate. After OCC then you have TBS after TBS then you have your MOS school. You will be training for atleast 9 months before you get libo. So your not just a 90 day blunder. Your training is considerably longer then that. Also Combat Arms MOS's are highly competitive, so you cant just sign up for infantry you have to be selected. One of my good friends just got back from TBS and has to go to his MOS school in Sept after being away for 9 months.

On the enlisted side, these tend to be more lax and are more easily waived then for an officer candidate. Plus, boot camp is not nearly as tough as OCC. Unless you go to NG OCS and that's every weekend for about 2 years or something ridiculous like that.

Plus being an officer will help you more on the federal side if thats the route you want to go.
Since your only 20, you have some thinking to do. If your going to join up purely for vet status then go NG and do your one weekend a month or reserves. If you want to do more with your life and have the coveted responsibility of leading troops/marines/sailors into combat then become an officer in a combat arms MOS.
 

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There is also the direct commission route for "professionals" (i.e. JAG, medical doctor, nurse, chaplain etc...).
As far as I know, there are only 4 ways to be commissioned at least in the USMC.
1: Platoon Leaders Course
2: Officer Candidate Class
3: NROTC
4: Naval Academy

This is according to the USMC website.

As far as waivers being granted for OCS classes, many officer candidates will require atleast one waiver. Ranging from medical issues such as flat feet, Lasik surgery, marijuana use, criminal record, some tattoos etc.

The waivers being granted are much more difficult to obtain for an OC since most are at the regional level.
 

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I don't know about JAG OCS in USMC, but as you know they do not have Medical or Chaplian Corps officers.

Army, Navy, Air Force all have direct commission programs for medical professionals It is an abreviated version of OCS
 

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Are there any members on here who are (or were) Commissioned Officers in any branch of the Military? If so, which branch?

What has going through OCS and being a Commissioned Officer done for you personally?

Besides gaining veteran status, do you feel that being a Commissioned Officer has helped significantly set you apart from other applicants when being hired by a Police Department?

Thanks for any and all replies!
My personal opinion is that "O" or "E" it does not much matter. The fact that someone served in the military, in my opinion, sets them apart. Be it active, reserve, officer or enlisted - even if they do not get "vet status" by civil service definition I feel there is an intangible that comes with being a vet.
 
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