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Retired Fed, Active Special
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I would respectfully disagree with sitting on your hands.
True that brother!........Thats why I said sit down and "rest hands on your knees" (where we can see em)
;)
 
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Lost in the desert..
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163 Posts
How about this for an isolated incident of stupidity... An Inmate get loose while at the hospital. An off duty officer decides, after over hearing us discussing the situation and lock down of the hospital, that he will have a look around for himself without informing the rest of officer present. The off duty officer mets the discription of the missing inmate except for the striped jumpsuit which we think the inmate already dumped. He almost gets shot by my guys in a stairwell that he is searching by himself with his firearm in his hand. To top it off this guy was not a new officer he was a Lt. from two towns over.
 

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JFC fail

I have one close. I'm plain clothes teaching. Gun must have flashed and a call went in to PD. Two day dopes come strolling up in condition retard... And say oh we just figured it was you. Call came in from a building not anywhere near class. Those guys are just fucking speed bumps if shit happened.
 
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Well, that's a BIG problem :eek:. Fortunately, it CAN be trained out...but how many departments dedicate that much time to training. Amped up responders often focus on the GUN to the exclusion of everything else including clothing, identification, and demeanor. It is shown on paper targets, and sim guns during training. Often there are multiple holes or strikes on the gun itself, because that's where the focus is. Proper training allows you to slow down and take in the situation as a whole, rather than get a startle response from seeing a gun. It's part of the OODA loop: Observe, Orient, Decide, ACT! a strategy for success designed by a fighter pilot. The more scenarios, with more variables, an individual is prepared for, the better chance they have at success. Some departments err on either side by designing scenarios so easy that no learning occurs, or so impossibly hard that the only effect is frustration. Training needs to be structured, repeatable, and evaluated. Role players have the HARDEST job because they need to be consistent, and not try to "game" the exercise.

Target scanning is an important skill. Most training seems to focus on the hands first, than expand. When that happens, someone holding a gun gets shot....then you see the badge, creds, etc. The more practice you get, the more you look at the person as a whole, THEN collapse to the hands. Eyes, expression, and clothing can have important clues as to the person and their intent.
I think part of the problem is that we (LE) tend to view the GUN as the threat. No gun, no lethal threat. Or less lethal threat. Situation dependent of course. The bad guys however overwhelmingly shoot for the head. Why is that? They don't tend to be better shots than LE. Or at least not on the range. I think it's because to the bad guy WE are the threat. No cop no threat. Their goal is to kill us. Ours is to "Stop the threat" and we train accordingly to lower our force usage when possible. The bad guy doesn't have to worry about that.

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